Internments

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    The Japanese Internment

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    If they could prove that someone was a witch and that someone was put to death, then their land would be able to be sold off for cheap (Miller). The was also true for the japanese internment (Japanese-American Internment). When the japanese were placed in concentration camps, most of them sold off their property for a fraction of the cost because they knew that they would probably have nothing to comeback to (Japanese-American Internment). During the time while they were in the camps the japanese elected representatives to speak to government officials but nothing major came of it (Japanese-American Internment). In Salem people were put on trial for being a witch where they had the opportunity to plead guilty and repent or plead innocence and be found guilty (Miller). Even if they were innocent it was their word against somebody else's and the Salem officials decided to play it safe than be sorry, just like the american government decided to play it safe and put all japanese descendants in camps, innocent or not (Jardins). In conclusion, from the start of america,the salem witch trials, to the second world war, when anyone of japanese ancestry was accused of being allies to their homeland, people have always feared what they do not know. The japanese-american internment was much like the salem witch trials in which america blamed innocents for self preservation, falsely accused for self gain, and misjudged for something japanese-americans didn’t…

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    II. Japanese Internment Camps during WWII It is estimated that around 120,000 Japanese in the United States were held in internment camps during WWII after U.S conflict with Japan grew (Onishi 1). Japanese-Americans were forced to take a test which asked them to pledge their loyalty with the United States, cut ties to Japan, and asked if they would pledge service to the United States military. An answer of “no” to any of the questions would result in the person being labeled as disloyal…

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    Fear is accredited of causing many important decisions based on the premiss of discomfort. Discomfort is a fearful topic, because it threatens the way in which people live. This When fear is instilled into a society, that society would do everything possible to bury that fear, and replaced it with comfort. During World War II fear struck American society. After the attack on Pearl Harbor the United States government instilled fear of Japan, including Japanese Americans, on the American society.…

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    Internment Camp Letter

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    Hey Dave, I wanted to send you this letter to tell you about most of my experience in this crazy internment camp. This internment camp is like a community but it is big and it can be scary at some points. My home here is really small, I live with my family and this other family of 4. Our home is a one room apartment that doesn’t have a bathroom so I have to walk so long just to use the bathroom. This internment camp is so big, it sits on 6,200 acres of land which is extremely big when you’re…

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    Japanese Internment Camps

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    The Justification of Japanese Internment Camps During World War Two, the entire world was in a state of confusion and vulnerability. However, the United States took drastic measures in order to confirm that no spies were present on the West Coast by issuing Executive Order 9066, an order that would change the lives of over 117,000 Japanese-Americans. Since 1942, when Congress passed this law, the justification of it was heavily debated. It was and still is considered inhumane, unnecessary, and…

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    Although Colonel Karl Bendetsen, a United States officer in charge of the internment program, referred to the Japanese people as evacuees and claimed that their welfare was being taken care of at the “Assembly Centers,” other sources say otherwise (Bendetsen 591). According to Dr. Chang in an interview, the Japanese were being imprisoned against their will in the so-called “Assembly Centers” which were technically prisons. Dr. Chang’s statement is further supported by a firsthand account by Ben…

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    Japanese-American internment camps Japanese internment camps were a horrible way of protecting the Japanese and Japanese-American from white pedestrians it violated their privacy, and a majority of them were against it. although the government claims they took great care of the Japanese, Japanese-Americans a big percentage of the victims mentioned their rights were violated for example: freedom of religion, freedom of speech, and right to assemble. they could not practice religion, for example…

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    World War II was a very difficult time for almost everyone living in either the Allies’ or Axis’ countries, especially for people of Japanese descent living in Canada. The Japanese-Canadian internment is a defining moment in Canada because it shows how poorly the Canadian governments, politicians, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP), and labour unions treated Japanese-Canadians. They had no freedom; were incarcerated in internment, road, or prisoners-of-war camps; and lastly, were unequal…

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    In 1942, Roosevelt ordered the Executive Order 9066, which resulted in the internment of Japanese American citizens.There are many reasons in which it was not justified, such as that Japanese Americans assimilated to American culture which proves that they wanted to be apart of America. They even wanted to bring their families with them, that shows that they want to show their new life to their families. Most of all, the internment of Japanese American citizens was not justified because there…

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    A massive amount of people were forced to leave their property and lives behind to spend two and a half years suffering in internment camps. These years consisted of torturous living conditions and dangerous lifestyles. The worst part is they hadn’t done anything to deserve it and they were placed in these camps by the country that promised them freedom and protection. 110,000 people, citizens, immigrants, adults, children, and infants, were all placed in these internment camps by the country…

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