Iambic tetrameter

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    The audience can visualize being in the wagon, listening to and sensing the horses’ clip-clop-clip-clop gallop. The poem’s six verses are arranged in quatrains; 8-6-8-6 is their syllabic composition, hence directing the poem in an established manner up to its conclusion. Moreover, the iambic tetrameter (within each verse’s lines 1 and 3) plus the iambic trimester (lines 2 and 4) get the audience back to the relaxed but unwavering pace of the horses. The first lines “Because I could not stop for Death- / He kindly stopped for me-” (1, 2) create a rhythm that keeps on advancing the poem frontward up to the concluding lines “I first surmised the Horses’ Heads / Were toward Eternity-” (23, 24) are done; from its opening to its conclusion, the poem’s rhythm is resolute. The poet adds to the poem’s rhythm by generating clear images of a wagon journey to a woman’s ultimate place of rest. Dickinson makes use of personification to render each image exact and plain; the poem is comparable to a scrapbook containing assorted pictures that convey a narrative. Death, Perpetuity…

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    Literary Analysis: Dulce et Decorum est & The Unknown Citizen Verbal irony is something that can be used in our everyday life. Auden’s poem’s title, “The Unknown Citizen” begins with a verbal irony. Owen mocks war in his poem, “Dulce et Decorum Est” by showing how sweet and fitting it is to die for one’s country. Both of the poems use irony to present to the reader the pity of war, how there is nothing heroic about the “unknown citizen” and how the two poets have a similar intention on…

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    characters that will be present for the rest of the play. Another way in which the audience will be able to identify the characters on stage as unhuman is through the use of meter, which is strange to the usual verse in which Shakespeare wrote in. “The twelve line scene is over almost as soon as it begins, and spectators watching the play for the first time may wonder whether they really did see and hear three witches speaking in a strange, sing-song…

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    voice replied” (15). This implies that there was not only his voice capable of replying, but whilst the poem never introduces another character, it could be concluded that the many voices are within the speaker’s mind. This could infer that he is schizophrenic. Further, after having strangled Porphyria, the speaker empathises over two lines the lack of pain she felt (41-42). Whether he truly believes this is unclear, as he may be frantically trying to console himself, but either way it shows the…

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    She Walks In Beauty Laced with endless compliments and adoration, Lord Byron’s poem “She Walks in Beauty” tells the story of a man admiring a woman’s beauty. While the speaker does not claim that he is in love with the nameless woman, it is evident that he is attracted to her – based on the detail in which he describes her physical beauty. The “cloudless…starry skies” and “tender light” accompanied by the undulating iambic tetrameter sets the perfect, romantic mood for the speaker to…

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    As one of Emily Dickinson’s few poems that were published during her life, “I taste a liquor never brewed” explores the complexity of nature and its intoxicating power. Dickinson employs an extended metaphor of drunkenness to convey the captivation that the beauty of nature provides (“Overview”). Written in alternating verses of iambic tetrameter and iambic trimeter, four quatrains comprise the entirety of this lyrical poem. All of the verses follow this pattern with the exception of verse 15:…

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    Gewalt Der Minne Analysis

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    obtained her power. On the one hand, this question could be understood as a challenge to her authority. On the other hand, it could express the speaker’s amazement at and admiration for Minne’s omnipotence, on which the second Stollen (vv. 3-4) expands further: She has power over everyone no matter their age and no one can resist regardless what they try. The symmetry in rhyme and the regular iambic tetrameter seem to enhance the inalterability of this state of affairs. The speaker’s reverence…

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    The meter in the sonnet is in iambic pentameter. But the last line proclaiming that “[she] shall but love thee better after death” (14) is in iambic tetrameter, which signifies the ambiguity of the person and the time of their death. Even though the death is uncertain, she will love him even more intensely in the afterlife. Barrett Browning asks the question “How do[es] [she] love thee” (1) starts the sonnet of with a trochee which initiates the answer to her own question and establishes her…

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    Kubla Khan Poem Analysis

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    Coleridge's Kubla Khan can be called a dream on a paper and rightfully so, for it is so hauntingly beautiful and so accurately composed as only a fragment of a vivid but forgotten dream can be.A major section of the poem is written in iambic tetrameter, with the words flowing as smooth as an incantation from the mouth of a sorcerer. It is, along with Rime of The Ancient Mariner, one of Coleridge's most famous and enduring pieces of work. The first three stanzas, penned in rich language, possess…

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    As in, An Irish Airman Foresees His Death” where Yeats responded to the hypocrisy of the British treatment and use of Irish soldiers in WWI. Upon the request of Lady Gregory to write a poem about her son Robert Gregory “constituted an awkward task for the poet.” –James Pethica. As he had to meet the request of Lady Gregory but at the same time not glorify war or make his muse a victim war. This short sixteen-line poem has a simple structure: lines metered in iambic tetrameter, and four grouped…

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