Hurricane Katrina

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    Hurricane Katrina A hurricane is a tropical cyclone that normally occurs in the North Atlantic Ocean, North America and the North-eastern Pacific Ocean. These cyclones normally build up over parts of oceans with relatively warmer water. They derive their body from evaporating water from the ocean which condenses to form clouds and precipitate as rain when the moist air reaches saturation. The motion is imparted to the cyclones by the rotation of the earth. Tropical cyclones rotate anticlockwise in the northern hemisphere while the motion is opposite in the southern hemisphere. A number of hurricanes have hit the North American continent since the formal documentation of hurricanes began. But very few have struck as hard as Hurricane Katrina…

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    Hurricane Katrina Imagine a deadly hurricane that will destroy anything in it’s path. Hurricane Katrina has changed the United States in many ways. Hurricane Katrina was larger than anticipated, and had a huge outcome for many cities and states. It was a catastrophic event in United States history. To begin, the devastation of Hurricane Katrina was caused by many things. According to www.history.com/topica/hurricane-Katrina, “Weather forecasters thought that…

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    Hurricane Katrina Essay

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    Hurricanes are not uncommon among the coastal regions. Atmospheric and sea-surface conditions were conducted to cyclone’s rapid transformation and resulted in what is known as Hurricane Katrina. Hurricane Katrina was tearing apart the Gulf of Mexico. It was a Category 5 hurricane and was predicted to create several landfalls within the affected area. The wind was moving in a pattern causing a storm surge toward the city like a high tide. Due to poor construction, the floodwall broke the flood…

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    Hurricane Katrina Impact

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    Hurricane Katrina was described as "one of the deadliest hurricanes to ever hit the United States" according to Kim Ann Zimmerman on livescience.com (2012). August 29, 2005 would completely change the lives of thousands of individuals and families in New Orleans, Louisiana due to impact of Hurricane Katrina. This tropical storm was categorized as a category 5 Hurricane due to the fact the damaging winds reached up to 175 miles per hour. Many people were able to evacuate before the storm became…

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    Introduction; In August 29, 2005, Hurricane Katrina attacked the Gulf Coast of the United States. Where, the storm causes landfall in golf coast states. The hurricane had a Classified 3 level on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale. The hurricane brought sustained winds about 100–140 miles per hour. Then, the winds have extended about 400 miles across. The storm itself did a great deal of damage, but its aftermath was catastrophic. Damage of dams led to massive flooding, and many people…

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    Hurricane Katrina Summary

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    Hurricane Katrina was a catastrophic event that affected many people located in New Orleans, LA and the surrounding states in 2005. Merely hours before the evacuation was announced and enforced, many people, specifically the African American community could not leave and decided to stay. Throughout all the research from the study there are a number of recurring ideas that led the population to stay that included: financial factors, social factors and racial pre-existing conditions within this…

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    Hurricane Katrina Report

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    For instance, after hurricane Katrina struck and destroyed the levee and drainage canal system that they had put in place there were several of individuals who suffered due to their homes being either submerged underwater or completely torn down due to the wind or water. Along with these issues there were also several of people that were missing and could not be located; this created a huge cause of concern and unease in people. Another issue that was a result of one of the problems, was that it…

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    Hurricane Katrina Thesis

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    Intro: Hurricane Katrina is an important event in history because it was a devastating hurricane that, damaged parts of the United States, the Federal government were unprepared, what has FEMA Changed to be more prepared? What happened after Hurricane Katrina hit? Thesis: Hurricane katrina caused damages to the united states and the United states was affected by the impact of the storm. History: Hurricane Katrina a devastating storm also known as a tropical depression that hit the Gulf Coast…

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    Does the Hurricane Katrina story exhibit the distinguishing features of a crisis, as defined in the introductory essay you read from the Howitt and Leonard text this week? Howitt and Leonard (2009), in their segment on Hurricane Katrina, depicts in detail the features of New Orleans in emergency crisis in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. A hurricane crisis which eventually escalated into a natural catastrophe as the storm's destructive winds and rain resulted in the rupture of the levees…

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    Next, along the Gulf Coast of New Orleans in 2005, Hurricane Katrina caused a lot of damage. All this damaged was due to the protection of the levees in New Orleans, it had broken and caused all the flooding to the towns and homes of these people (Palser, 2007, p.14). Therefore, Hurricane Katrina was not only the most destructive natural disasters, but the most accurately predicted (Palser, 2007, p.16). However, a hurricane warning is usually expected within 24 hours or less (Hurricane, n,d.).…

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