Hippocampus

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    Dougherty, etc). Heavy Marijuana users had impairments with the short term memory area in the brain (hippocampus, and subiculum); “even when the participants had abstained from smoking after six weeks” (Donald M. Dougherty, Etc). “Recall memory was poor in marijuana adults and adolescents, but evidence shows that recall deficits can recover with extended abstinence…

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    The hippocampus is the most important part of the brain because it is responsible for transferring information from working memory to long-term memory so it can be used again.If this area gets damaged, someone would forget everything that had happened previous the accident, but would be able to create new memories from that point on. There are many other aspects that play a role in us remember and forgetting. Two things that could cause someone to forget are interference and individual…

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    Essay On Substance Use

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    system is a neural system that includes the hippocampus, amygdala, and hypothalamus. This system, associated with emotions and drive, is located below the cerebral hemispheres and holds a very valuable part of the brain. The hippocampus has the important role of processing explicit memories for storage. Losing this part of the brain is being depleted of the ability to form new memories, which significantly affects the lifestyle of a person in a…

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    Amnesia In Memento

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    In an experiment conducted by Zola-Morgan (1986), an amnesic patient named R.B. had damage to one specific region (CA1) of the hippocampus, therefore, supporting that damage limited to the hippocampus is enough to cause amnesia. This indicates that Nolan portrayed Lenny’s amnesia with a basis in creating lesions in the hippocampus and greater MTL regions, however, the severity of both Lenny’s retrograde and anterograde amnesia are contentious. A study done by Race and Verfaellie…

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    Memory Retrograde Amnesia

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    taken before a specific date, usually the date of an accident or operation. However, he or she can still develop memories after the accident. Retrograde is usually caused by head trauma or brain damage to parts of the brain besides the hippocampus. The hippocampus is responsible for training new memory. People suffering from retrograde amnesia are more likely to remember general knowledge rather than specifics. They usually remember older memories rather than recent ones. Retrograde amnesia is…

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    For several complex historical, philosophical and scientific reasons, Western Culture has often tried to unravel the mystery of human being within the dualistic conception of body and mind, by privileging the higher rational processes - such as language and cognition - over somatic experiences. In psychotherapy, this manifest preference influences the understanding and treatment of trauma. Since trauma is an “event inside a person’s head” (Henry, 2006, p. 383), traditional interventions target…

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    “Memento” is a movie directed by Christopher Nolan (2000) which follows a man, Leonard, who apparently has anterograde amnesia. After receiving a severe blow to the head, Leonard ended up with a traumatic brain injury that apparently damaged his hippocampus. He is unable to form and retain new memories. Memories prior to the incident remain intact. In order to deal with his condition, Leonard tattoos important facts on his body that he doesn’t want to forget, takes pictures of new people, places…

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    Synaptic Plasticity

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    potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD) have been shown to be fundamental cellular mechanisms underlying learning and memory. Induction of LTP occurs concomitantly with learning in the hippocampus of freely-moving animals and is known to prevent occludes subsequent electrical induction of LTP in the hippocampus (Whitlock et al., 2006). Conversely, saturation of hippocampal LTP is also known to interfere with spatial memory formation (Barnes et al., 1994). A recent study has…

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    Analysis Of Inside Out

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    would be sad. After this has passed, the memory would be recorded as sad moment and then transferred to long-term memory. One of the main reasons memories are affected by our feelings is because of an extremely important part of our brain, the hippocampus (Korb, A. 2015). This part of the brain is mainly responsible for memory, however it is connected to the limbic system. Another piece that is a part of the limbic system is the amygdala, which controls the emotions (Berger, 2004). To say the…

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    and sensory information is transmitted within it. (World of Anatomy 10) and ultimately connects to the spinal cord. There are four types of memory: episodic memory, Semitic memory, procedural memory, and working memory. (Memory of biology) The hippocampus is where the memory cells are located (Talk of the Nation.) It also largely controls behavioral responses and is where show term memory is stored (World Anatomy 12). In the cortex, the memories that are long term and meaningful are stored (Talk…

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