Hippocampus

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    Implicit Memory

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    "Implicit memory is shown when performing on a task is enabled in the absence of conscious remembrance; explicit memory is unmasked when the performance on a task requires conscious memory of previous occurrences (Graf and Schacter, 1985 in Anderson, 2015) and conveyed in typical tests of cued and free recall and recognition. Event memory loss after an injury is called anterograde amnesia which involves the extended hippocampal complex and the thalamus which helps form new memories (Salnaitis,…

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    thinking, planning, and remembering information. For Alzheimer’s patients, the cortex shrivels up causing the loss or gain of any information. The shrinkage of the Hippocampus is directly responsible for the inability to store new memories. Researchers have conducted various tests to visualize the relationship between the size of the hippocampus and verbal memory. The results indicate “measure of nonverbal memory was most closely related to hippocampal size among the larger sample”…

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    Savant Syndrome Theory

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    Savant Syndrome- Savant Skills Locked Within Us? Savant syndrome is a form of rare neurological condition where individuals with such extraordinary anomaly, while having problems in proper mental function, are able to express certain prodigious abilities such as memorizing and lightning calculation (Treffert, 2009). The term “savant” originated from the word “savoir” which means “to know” in French (Treffert, 2009). The word “idiot savant” was first introduced by Dr. J. Langdon Down in his…

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    What Is Amnesia?

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    Amnesia – the phenomenon of forgetting something previously known – has several different classifications. This forgetting may be due to a multitude of causes, and these different causes and the conditions in which they occur help define the classification of amnesias used today. 5 main classifications are anterograde, retrograde, infantile, transient global, and functional amnesia. Each will be defined and briefly discussed. Anterograde amnesia is “a severe loss of the ability to form new…

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    Implicit Memory

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    memory is the storage of events and facts (Squire, 1992). Because implicit memory is unconscious and explicit memory is conscious, there are different mechanisms and anatomical locations involved. Explicit memory is known to be centered in the hippocampus whereas implicit is located in the striatum or basal ganglia (Packard & Knowlton, 2002). The mechanism of storing and losing long-term memories has been extensively studied.…

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    Gould, 2010). Ecstasy increases the dopamine and serotonin levels, and stimulates norepinephrine production, and through continued use, can stunt natural production of these neurotransmitters. MDMA affects working memory and visual recall in the hippocampus. Abusers can have memory lapses and impairment without being aware of it (Futures of Palm Beach, 2016). Verbal memory is simply memory for words. Chronic amphetamine and…

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    Throughout our lives we watch and find enjoyment through many different films and cinemas. A lot of the time we find ourselves critiquing the movie based on many different factors such as the quality of writing, acting or actors, the film quality, or the way we are entertained by it. In many movies are disabilities and disorders we can see in psychology that are portrayed in different ways, and it is important we call attention to these movies and critique them through a scientific lens. In many…

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    Obstacles In Education

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    flow in this area. As a result, they may process information more quickly and may be able to respond to information faster than males (Gurian & Stevens, 2010). Additionally, the hippocampus, which converts information from short-term memory into long-term memory, tends to be larger in the female brain. The larger hippocampus may provide females with increased memory storage and the ability to access more information for recall. Female brains may also mature earlier than male brains, as the last…

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    Essay On Cannabinoids

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    the brain. The prefrontal cortex is found at the anterior section of this lobe. The parietal lobes are primarily responsible for receiving and processing sensory input. The temporal lobes deal with functions of language, emotion, and memory. The hippocampus is in the medial temporal part of the brain, and the amygdala is found in the frontal part of it. The occipital lobes are involved in visual information processing and object recognition. The cerebellum underlies the temporal and occipital…

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    Kluver Bucy Syndrome

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    The amygdala is often called the “aggression center” of the brain. There are two of them in one’s limbic system, and they are located on either side of the thalamus, at the end of the hippocampus, a little bit in front of the brain stem. When the amygdalas are stimulated, one feels anger, violence, fear, and anxiety. When the amygdalas are completely destroyed, a person has what is called Kluver-Bucy syndrome. The effects of this syndrome include hyperorality, hypersexuality, and…

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