Gray Wolf

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    America. Now they have ranged through Alaska, canada,pacific northwest, the Great Lakes, and northern Rockies. Wolves Height is in a range of 26-34 inches at shoulder height. Wolves weigh an average of 70-115 pounds. Their fur is colored white, black, gray, and tan all over. Wolves can have grey, green, brown, yellow, or orange eyes - all these colours can vary in the tone of lightness darkness, though the green is a pale-ish light green. Wolves eat mostly mammals such as moose, elk,…

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    The panting of a hunt, with the kick of an adrenaline rush. It is impressive how a gray wolf can strive with its survival skill. Strong creatures they are, much like a German shepherd on steroids. While most gray wolves living in the Canadian wilderness have common lives, the male wolf named Buck, is a lone wolf. He is a sleek, tall, and young wolf on his own and living by day. He has been this way since The Allegiance… Buck yelped as his mother pulled the last quill out. “Now you know not to…

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    The domestic dog (Canis familiaris) was the first animal species to be domesticated by humans. They were tamed from Eurasian gray wolves (Canis lupus), and genetic studies revealed that this domestication could have occurred up to 40,000 years ago. There are many theories to how humans began taming wolves. One theory was that wolves began following people around in order to more easily acquire food and that the ‘tamer’ wolves were kept as pets. As people began acquiring these wolves they began…

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    Wolf Self-Domestication

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    incredible bond with humans. Something that no two other species on the planet have accomplished. The two are so connected in communication and emotions because they evolved the ability to read our social cues to survive with us. • Gray…

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    carnivores. The Caniformia are separated into two families; one family is known as Canidae and the other is Arctoidae, which includes Ailuredae, Procyonidae, Ursidae, and Pennipedae (Wang). During the Paleocene period, approximately sixty million years ago, wolf predecessors began to develop (Koryos). Later in the Miocene, some early Caninae were able to cross Bering Strait to Europe and the breed Canis lupus dingos were transported to Australia by humans (Wang). From there, Canidae became one…

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    Many years ago, laying out on the trampoline late at night, I remember hearing the coyotes howl and yip in the field bordering my friend’s house. The sound so frightened us that we promptly rushed inside. To children that grew up never truly in the country, only on the edge of town, coyotes seemed so wild. However, as Dan Flores illuminates in his book, Coyote America: A Natural and Supernatural History, that encounter was not an unusual experience at all. In the past century coyotes have spread…

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    Cordelia Dallam Mrs. Dwiggins Computers 9/19/14 The Alaskan Malamute The Alaskan Malamute is the largest and oldest of the Arctic sled dogs, they are the cousin to the Samoyed, Siberian Husky, and American Eskimo dog. Like the Husky they are sled dogs; though they aren’t designed to race but rather to carry large loads over long distances. They have always been used as sled dogs for heavy freighting in the Arctic. The Malamute possess great strength and endurance which helps…

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    He states “Dogs are gray wolves… the wide variety in their adult morphology probably results from the simple changes in developmental rate and timing”(Schwarts). After the conducted study, the analysis proved that “gray wolves and dogs vary by just 0.2 percent in their...DNA”(Schwarts). Being that dogs originated from wolves, this could determine their wild, hunting-like…

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    back to when it all began I jolted awake as a blood curdling howl pierced the bitter cold air. What started out as a seemingly relaxed hiking trip turned into 3 days of pure, adreneline driven, survival, when a pack of ravenous, blood-thirsty gray wolves started hunting me. I thought I had lost them when I jumped 3 and a half meters across an almost bottomless ravine going a mile in either direction. I don't know how they caught up to me, but now was not the time to think about that. I…

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    Dogs Don’t Bite When a Growl Will Do: What Your Dog Can Teach You About Living a Happy Life examines the relationship between a person and their dog. Broken into sixty-seven lessons, the book allows us to reflect and learn from man’s best friend. Each thought provoking chapter are fairly short, concise, and tells its own story. This leads to the reader not having to read the book from cover to cover, rather each chapter independently perhaps one each day almost like a devotional. The personal…

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