Futurism

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    Italian Futurism and English Vorticism are generally considered to be Modernist movements. Indeed, literary scholar Peter Childs includes Futurism and Vorticism in his seminal book aptly titled Modernism, placing them amongst other Modernist movements like Expressionism, Surrealism, and Dadaism (14). In one of Childs’s many definitions of Modernism, he argues that the movement is imbued with “radical aesthetics, technical experimentation, spatial or rhythmic rather than chronological form, self-conscious reflexiveness, scepticism towards the idea of a centered human subject, and a sustained inquiry into the uncertainty of reality” (18). Certainly, Futurism and Vorticism utilize these Modernist elements in order to radically “break from the past” (30); however, there are certain characteristics that may suggest that Futurism, and in some ways Vorticism as well, transgresses traditional definitions of Modernism. Futurism does not merely profess this Modernist scepticism towards the centered human subject, but professes a profound exaltation of…

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    Futurism And Street Light

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    As a member of Futurism, Giacomo Balla was passionate about technology, youth, violence, and most importantly the use of technology within his artwork. The work of art I am writing about is the Street Light painting of 1910, made by Giacomo Balla. Giacomo Balla, Street Light, c. 1910-11. Oil on canvas, 5ft 9in x 3ft 9in. The Futuristic painting is being held at the Museum of Modern Art in New York. Where people from all walks of life can view this painting in its monumental size. I ask myself…

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    Constructivism, written by Russian artist and designer, Aleksei Gan, and The Founding and Manifesto of Futurism 1909 written by Italian poet, Filippo Marinetti, both have written an extensive manifesto of their movements. Aleksei Gan believed that since most people are joined through labor, technologies’ of individual branches of production would form a united social technology, accurately and concretely. Constructivism took artists and architects, and turned them into Constructors. This caused…

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    Reasons For Futurism

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    Robert E. Kelsey Jr. Doc. Gregory Caicco ART1030 P01 11/6/2017 Style Guide for Futurism and Purism. Futurism In a contemporaneous era of the early 1900’s with modernistic art movements, “Futurism” redefined a well social-political agenda. This inauguration was named by the “charismatic Italian poet as well playwriter Filippo Tommaso Marinetti” (1876-1944). 1909 was the creation “Futurism” movement, but soon encompassed the visual arts and cinemas, music and architecture. “Futurists” were…

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    Pros And Cons Of Futurism

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    The idea relates the human being with machines. That’s by connecting the human brain with hard copies, so a people can save their memories, and more things to get lost. Moreover, he sees that we are limited to our current physical and mental. So, we should go over our identity, and extend more these limitation. For example, relate our bodies with the modern technology. That idea known as transhumant. The Idea of futurism (study of the future)could brings more evidence to…

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    . Although theses three modern styles varied, the works involved all occupied a new and more complex space. Mel Gooding explains this as a ‘trend in modern art away from the representation of recognisable objects in pictorial space and towards presentation of a painting or sculpture as a real object in real space.’ Up until this time the pictorial space created in the art work aimed to create the illusion of a real pictorial space for the spectator. The technique of one point perspective which…

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    Futurism was the most important and influential Italian avant-garde art movement that took speed, technology and modernity as its inspiration which emerged from the 20h century (The Art Story, 2016). The group of the Futurists loved speed, noise, machines, pollution, and urban landscapes; they were committed to change in Italy as the country was behind in comparison to the rest of Europe. Futurism was not about visual or traditional art, they were fascinated by new visual technology and used it…

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    After World War I, the Dada movement arose out of Switzerland from the years 1916-1924. It was heavily influenced by various other movements including Cubism, Expressionism, and Futurism. The movement was portrayed through many different outlets including photography, literature, sculptures, and of course paintings. This movement was known for how it made fun of or mocked modern common aesthetic. It contrasted the ideas of materialism, and how “nationalistic attitudes” turned out to be a heavy…

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    Umberto Boccion

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    I am at the Museo del Novecento, in Milan, Italy, learning about Umberto Boccioni’s Unique Forms of Continuity in Space. This bronze sculpture was created in 1913 during the Cubism and Futurism periods. Though the trip was costly, I decided to go anyway to learn more about this extraordinary piece. The work portrays a runner in full speed; its legs facing forward, display the speed and power of the runner. The cost of traveling to the city, roundtrip, reached a little over $1,400 of airfare,…

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    Though suprematism was a short lived movement in the art and design worlds, it’s leading theories and principles helped to shape what we see today. Beginning in 1913 and being heavily influenced by the avant-garde poets of the time, Suprematism revolves heavily around the “Zero Degree” of painting, in which artists would aim to push the medium they were using as far as they could, in order to emphasize the material itself rather than what it depicted. The movement’s founder, Kazimir Malevich,…

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