Fluoride poisoning

Sort By:
Decent Essays
Good Essays
Better Essays
Amazing Essays
Best Essays
    Page 1 of 16 - About 157 Essays
  • Good Essays

    ages, is safe, free to consume and is natural. Despite the continual support for fluoride within dental, medical and scientific communities, there is marked opposition by the general public and a minority of scientists. Through a critical analysis of both the benefits of water fluoridation and its supposed disadvantages, it can be seen that its relevance and vitality for maintaining oral health is stagnant. Dental caries is a common cause of acute preventable hospital admissions in Australia, and the addition of fluoride to water systems…

    • 1547 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Pros And Cons Of Fluoride

    • 1764 Words
    • 8 Pages

    is higher than countries who do not fluoridate their water. Fluoride has been called the greatest public health achievement of the 20th century, but still there is no proven effect to the American people's teeth. So, why than is 66.3% of the U.S. population receiving fluoridated water and why are taxpayers paying millions of dollars to put a harmful chemicals into their water? Fluoride is a drug and harmful chemical that the people of the U.S. deserve to choose whether or not they want to ingest…

    • 1764 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Blaylock Chapter Summary

    • 1134 Words
    • 5 Pages

    Blaylock highlights how independent study after study has shown that fluoride increases cancer rates, increases bone disorders, which as Blaylock points out is a good way of increasing mortality rates amongst the elderly, and also leads to profound neurological disorders. Blaylock highlights the research of Phyllis Mullenix, Ph.D, who during her tenure at Harvard University conducted one of the largest studies into fluoride’s effects on the brain in animals. Mullenix found that offspring of…

    • 1134 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    the process of adding fluoride to the water supply so the level reaches approximately 0.7 ppm, or 0.7 milligrams of fluoride per liter of water. The water is fluoridated when the public water system is adjusted to a level that helps to prevent tooth decay and other dental problems. About 95% of fluoride is added to public…

    • 1060 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Better Essays

    relationship between fluoride and oral health when discussing the fluoride concentration within a public water system. These articles, however, are quite similar in their findings, yet differ in the location the study was conducted in and age groups that were focused on. This paper examines Banóczy (2013), Peterson (2015), as well as O’Sullivan & O’Connell’s (2015) research to fully understand the relationship of fluoridation within public water systems in a discussion of the effects on oral…

    • 1829 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    but there is a chemical called fluoride added to most public water services. These water services would include school and city water. You are most likely drinking this water at some time. Many people believe that water fluoridation protects the teeth from tooth decay, however there is actually many risks with consuming the water. The risks include risks to the body. Supplementing fluoride to public water services is unethical and creates risk to a person’s dental and overall health. When…

    • 1300 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Amazing Essays

    the hydroxide ions. In light of Le Chatelier’s principle, in which a decrease in the reactant, shifts the equilibrium to the left. Also, since iron is being used to form iron hydroxide, then not enough iron to produce a substantial amount of complex to create a noticeable color change. Consequently, the maximum absorbance of the iron (III)-thiocyanate depends on the pH and duration. Anion Effects: Different salts were added to determine if solvent composition has an effect on the maximum…

    • 1332 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Amazing Essays
  • Better Essays

    Rangi's Treatment Plan

    • 1574 Words
    • 7 Pages

    of the the 55, I will apply the glass ionomer/composite laminate techique. Otherwise known as the ‘closed sandwich tecqnique’, this method is suitable for deep cavities. In addition, the fluoride release and effective chemical bonding properties of GIC to enamel and dentine will provide a good seal for the cavity and protect the pulp. Moreover, the usage of GIC as a sealant in the absence of healthy dentinde minimise polymerisation shrinkage related to resin-composite (Vilkinis,…

    • 1574 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Amazing Essays

    hotly debated topic. Although being hailed by the CDC as one of the top 10 public health achievements of the 20th century, water fluoridation has been heavily criticized by governments, scientists and even dentists from its inception. With fluoride’s recent classification as hazardous waste, fluoridation policies have come under renewed scrutiny. While there is no question that excessive amounts of fluoride cause dental fluorosis, there is a very large body of evidence linking fluoride to…

    • 1389 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Amazing Essays
  • Good Essays

    Water Fluoridation Essay

    • 1174 Words
    • 5 Pages

    (such as mouth rinse, toothpaste or fluoride tablets), and consumption of CWF (Cheng, Chalmers, & Sheldon, 2007; RSNZ & PMCSA, 2014). As a preventative measure…

    • 1174 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Previous
    Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 16