Feminist literary criticism

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    to this theory is that “women as readers” are consumers of solely male produced literature and oftentimes men hypothesize femininity, providing false pretenses surrounding the true nature of women (Showalter). A few prominent theorists and works are Charles Bressler, author of Literary Criticism: An Introduction to Theory and Practice, Toril Moi and her essay “Feminist Literary Criticism,” and Elaine Showalter’s “Toward a Feminist Poetics.” The common motive behind the feminist literary criticism is to identify and restore female representation as well as debunk the typical patriarchal, or a governed by men control that is seen in the literary world. “In this patriarchal world, man more frequently than not defines what it means to be human. Woman has become the Other, the “not-male.” Man is the subject, the one who defines meaning. Woman is the object, having her existence defined and determined by the male” (Bressler). Bressler depicts the traditional form of literature prior to the 19th century, which was male oriented. This is the reason for such uproar from women to evolve literature into a representative device of both male and female interest. A patriarchal literary world gave heed to the feminist movement within literature, working in order to produce a shift from male…

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    In her book Writing Women’s Literary History, Margaret J. M. Ezell discusses, among other topics, the aspects and effects of literary criticism upon women’s literature. With the large and obvious exception of Virginia Woolf, about whom, it should be conceded, Ezell devoted more than a chapter of discussion, Ezell spends a great deal of her book discussing the myriad ways that men and their actions and opinions shaped the development of women’s literature. In particular, in her discussions of the…

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    Reflective Essay Strength

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    William Shakespeare uses coding and transgressive sexuality to encourage the Golden Young Man to accept who he is and to have sex with Shakespeare himself.” On Blackboard, Hannah commented “nice thesis statement” and in the Feedback section it says “Very strong thesis statement. You followed through on your argument well.” In my New Criticism essay, “No Buckingham Palace Here; How ‘London’ by William Blake is a Criticism of the City and the Destruction of Family”, I received comments from the…

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    Foster cites the novel Going After Cacciato, by Tim O 'Brien as an example of a novel that borrows ideas from other works of literature to accomplish his own original ending. Foster makes the point that there is only one story, and every story that you have ever encountered is part of the one overlying story. This idea that different works of literature relate to one another is based upon intertextuality, which is the relation and interaction that different works of literature have. Intertextual…

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    Self-Evaluation Essay Little did I know that I was going to learn a lot more than I thought throughout the semester in ENGL 1433. I began the course dreading reading and writing. I just wanted to be done with the class before the class began and go back to science classes. I never have considered myself a good writer or someone who was good at analyzing literature, it was never something I enjoyed. Despite these initial thoughts and preconceived notions, I did, for the most part, enjoy the…

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    Literary Analysis Collection 1 Characters, conflict, setting, and theme are examples of literary elements. In the stories of “The Trip,” “The Leap,” and “Contents of a Dead Mans Pocket.” The authors use these literary elements in a similar and different ways. Characters are any person, animal, or figure represented in any literary work. Conflict is when two forces oppose one another in a literary work. Then there is setting which is the time or place in which a story occurs in a story. Theme is…

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    Stop All The Clocks

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    their love for the recipient of the poem extends to all these directions, like when a child hold their arms out wide and says “I love you this much” or saying “I love you to the moon and back.” This is significant because both these authors are sharing the same idea with the audience, which shows that the way that you love someone will not only carry out throughout life, but stay with you after they die. Another interesting thing that these poems both share is that they could be written for…

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    Mutability and Permanance: An Analytical Exploration of Epigrams 4-6 in Spenser’s Translations of Theatre for Worldlings Reading literature by Edmund Spenser requires a keen eye and a willingness to investigate beyond the text. You are not simply able to read Spenser and somehow acquire what each line means as a first-time reader of his works. Reading Spenser peaks ones’ interest to explore common themes, similarities, imagery, and the allusions which bring forward the meaning behind the text.…

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    Fiction reflects the thoughts, aspirations, and struggles of its author. Through literary works, one can come to understand a cultural consciousness previously unbeknownst to them. With this in mind, historians have learned to use rather than ignore literature as an aid in their studies. Vernacular and modern tales of the Congo region capture both the fantastical and factual elements. Epics, like The Mwindo Epic, echo the foundation of Congolese culture form which thereafter conflict has arisen…

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    After our class discussion with Dr. Greenberg—regarding William Blake’s background and the societal context that influenced his poetry—I began to form various connections between Blake’s Introduction to the Songs of Innocence and Jean-François Lyotard’s The Postmodern Condition: A Report on Knowledge. With regard to The Postmodern Condition, I was intrigued by Lyotard’s argument that examined the method by which individuals acquire knowledge through their own societal perspectives. Lyotard’s…

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