Extrajudicial punishment

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    According to a Rappler article by Michael Bueza, there were 5,927 people killed (2,086 in police operations, 3,841 extrajudicial or by vigilantes), 33,830 arrested, and 764,742 "surrendered" (As of 12/12/2016). The citizens live in fear, not because of criminals but from the government. In the Financial Times article, by Bryan Harris and Grace Ramos, there are three ways the death toll has risen up as fast as it has. The first is by the government through the Philippine army and national police in executions and ambushes at police checkpoints. Sometimes people will be stopped by the police and then arrested or killed immediately. Out of fear, people turn themselves in to the local police stations for processing, hoping that by turning themselves…

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    The Rwandan Genocide was an example of extrajudicial killing on a mass scale. Violence has long been used as a solution to problems within the Philippines, going back to colonial times. After Ferdinand Marcos declared martial law, the killings in the Philippines increased. With the country descending into lawless chaos, both the rebels and government forces resorted to barbaric tactics, with the NPA “known to have used death squads known as ‘Sparrow Units’ in the mid-80s to purge its ranks of…

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    The YCJA, Youth Criminal Justice Act, is a law activated to differentiate youth criminals from age of 12-17 and adult criminals.The act was enacted in 2002, but it came into power at April 1, 2003.The YCJA is a practical act that insures the rights of young offenders over public safety. Public safety is important, however, the protection of young offenders rights it's of paramount importance. A fine example such as the Sherwood Park case illustrates the YCJA perfectly. An acute policy of the…

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    Background and Review of Related Literature Theory Studies have found that behavior problems effecting academic outcomes are universal. Problem behaviors can be defined by Strain, Wilson, and Dunlap (2011) as behaviors that interfere and disrupt instruction. Disruptive behaviors such as aggression and noncompliance are common problems that interfere with desirable behaviors. Compliance in the classroom is essential for students to benefit socially, behaviorally, and academically. According…

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    Over 100 years ago the United States established the Juvenile Justice system. In most states, a person who between the ages of 10 and 18 charged with a crime is considered a juvenile . The juvenile justice system main goal is to help rehabilitation rather than punishing the individual and held youths who commit crimes responsible for their action. Where adults who are accused and found guilty of a crime, the criminal justice courts focus on punishments. There are many debates over the…

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    be safeguarded, yet it has been full of issues since its creation. There was much imperviousness to it before all else and not the greater part of that resistance originated from the republican side of the passageway. Indeed, even a few democrats were against it. The same is fundamentally genuine whether one is discussing congress and the administration, or whether one is discussing the overall public there is resistance to the law. That was the main obstacle that must be moved beyond. Once…

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    Since February 1994, Jeff Jacoby has been an op-ed columnist for The Boston Globe, where the essay, “Bring Back Flogging,” was published on February 20, 1997(Jacoby 196). In this essay, Jacoby claims the argument that prison time is so inhumane and he also shows that there are many flaws of imprisonment. Therefore, he wants to persuade his audience that flogging is an effective method of punishing criminals. In order to completely understand Jeff Jacoby’s argument, I will show how he convinces…

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    The four Philosophies of Punishment (1) Retribution: It is a hypothesis of equity that considers proportionate punishment an adequate reaction to wrongdoing. This retribution theory essentially fit the ethical gravity of a wrongdoing committed and, to a lesser degree, the qualities of the guilty party. Furthermore, it is utilized as the premise for discipline which includes compulsory sentencing strategies and sentencing rules frameworks. These disciplines are a social articulation of the…

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    126). This shows that Dimmesdale uses a scourge on himself to try to repent his sins. This is a practice that has not been commonplace in Christianity for several hundred years, but still Dimmesdale practices flagellation. The act of flagellation is meant to show devotion to God, but Dimmesdale uses it more as a way to punish himself. He sees himself as deserving the pain, he thinks that his sins warrant repentance and he deals this punishment onto himself. He laughs because he is in slight…

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    very similar to mine. One in particular, Donna Murch, thought that prison was for punishment, but also for businesses to make money off of. She tells us that it takes advantage of people by writing “It also makes money through asset forfeiture, lucrative public contracts from private service providers, and by directly extracting revenue and unpaid labor from populations of color and the poor” (Murch 1). Some, however, thought that incarcerating someone was a bad idea all together. With different…

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