Emotion and memory

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    Working Memory (WM) Working memory is defined as a kind of mental “workbench” where individuals manipulate and assemble information when they make decisions, solve problems, comprehend written and spoken language (Baddely, 2012). And is central in a wide range of cognitive abilities. WM and Bilingualism The primary process of executive function includes cognitive control like inhibition and shifting in working memory. This involves the ability to override a habitual but incorrect response…

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    Limitation to memory training One of the limitation of memory training are many productive mnemonic strategies which is invented to work in a particular region and do not always been summarily generalize to new situations. The second is a more noteworthy limitation is that even when people who know suitable memory strategies for optimizing their learning knowledge but they do not always use them. Instinctively using of mnemonic strategies seems to depend on cognitive control, and therefore…

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    University in the Division of Kinesiology, Health and Sport Studies in Detroit Michigan. Background The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of an 8-week Hatha yoga intervention on executive function measures of task switching and working memory…

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    Gender Differences in Memory for Object and Word Location Why are men better at map reading than women? And why are women better at recalling routes and recognizing objects location? According to Postma and Maartje (2007), they define object location as the cognitive ability that allows individuals to recall specific objects, and functions in everyday life. Object location aides us remembering where we left certain items such as water bottle, cellphone, or keys and in explaining our environment…

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    Implicit Memory

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    neural subsystem, including memory. There are two main types of memory, explicit and implicit (Schacter, 1987; Jancke, 2008; Ettlinger, Margulis, & Wong, 2011). Explicit memory is the conscious recall of information; it is used while memorizing a list of words (Schacter, 1987; Ettlinger et al., 2011). Implicit memory is the unconscious memory that develops over time; since implicit memory stems from perceptual learning and experience, it lasts longer than explicit memory. (Schacter, 1987;…

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    Block Memory Essay

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    Suppressing bad memories from the past can block memory formation in the here and now, research suggests. The study could help to explain why those suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and other psychological conditions often experience difficulty in remembering recent events, scientists say. Writing in Nature Communications, the authors describe how trying to forget past incidents by suppressing our recollections can create a “virtual lesion” in the brain that casts an…

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    interests are focused on molecular mechanisms of memory formation during infancy. I’m very interested in exploring how experiences during infancy results in hippocampal long-lasting changes, which influence adult behavior. Traumatic early life experiences can predispose individuals to psychopathologies, including post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), borderline personality disorder, addiction, depression and anxiety1-4. Paradoxically, episodic memories formed during infancy are apparently…

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    As it is stated in The Identity Function of Autobiographical Memory, "...self-identity depends on autobiographical memory, but the nature and strength of the association depends on qualities of both the self-identity and the memories. Moreover, the relation is reciprocal: People 's recollections influence their self-views and vice versa." (pg. 137, Identity Function...) This is the essential relationship between memory and self-identity. Paul Brok establishes a similar idea in All in the…

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    Memory can be reformed, however, this fact is not always accurate; memory is frequently flawed due to people being biased with deductions about what we assume to happen and generate false memories. Reconstructive memory is a cause for memories that aren’t always reliable. During the year 1973, Loftus worked with sematic memory. She conducted an experiment where she presented an occurrence and had the participants list categories associated with the event. She measured the time of reaction, the…

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    Prospective memory or PM for short is the form of memory where someone recalls or remembers to perform an action in the future after the task was planned. This happens every day, from going grocery shopping, getting a haircut, or making that one annoying phone call to an insurance company. This paper is meant to look at how drinking effects prospective memory. This is important because drinking is a big cultural norm that can have bad side effects. Humans need their prospective memory to…

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