Elephant

Sort By:
Decent Essays
Good Essays
Better Essays
Amazing Essays
Best Essays
    Page 8 of 50 - About 500 Essays
  • Good Essays

    shooting an Elephant where he is forced into a situation that can cause him to be praised or hated. In this story we see how Orwell is placed into a situation where he torn between pleasing the people of Burma, his personal morals, and the safety of others. It would be hard for most people seeing an elephant just roaming around peacefully, and then being told that you must kill the peaceful giant in order to provide safety and justices. Once Orwell picked up the gun and headed towards the…

    • 827 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Orwell saw fist had the good and the bad that comes with imperializing a country. Three important symbols that come together to give a vivid description in Orwell’s “shooting an Elephant” are , the rifle, the elephant, and the villagers. A rifle can be week, powerful, large, or small. The rifle in Orwell’s “shooting an Elephant” fistly represents England 's power. England was losing its power as a rifle can as it ages. A rifle can be improved, it can be fitted with new parts therefore giving…

    • 734 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Orwell's Values In The Killing Of The Elephant Orwell is struggling with his two very different values that come into conflict about shooting the elephant and how they impact his decisions. We first see that Orwell values the life of the animal. When he is first asked to come deal with the situation he grabs a small gun to just scare the animal but not big enough to kill it. To him he see’s the elephant as a living creature just like anyone else who deserves to live. He says “somehow it always…

    • 412 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    conflict. In the two texts, “Shooting an Elephant” by George Orwell and “The Guest” by Albert Camus, it can be seen that the two protagonists struggle in making a decision due to their values. A personal reflective of myself can also display that I have also dealt with, where my values interfere with a conflict that I was facing. The values in conflict we face as an individual influences us to make a choice that will shape our future. The essay “Shooting an Elephant” discusses Orwell's values…

    • 1155 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    “Shooting An Elephant,” George Orwell’s famously anti-imperialist essay, brings to light the complicated idea regarding the malleability of one’s conscience and questions the stability of a moral code. He begins the essay by recounting his time in Burma as a British officer, and how his hatred of imperialism was becoming overshadowed by the Burmese peoples’ distaste for his fellow colonizers and him. He wished to gain the trust and respect of these people in order to put this cognitive…

    • 1237 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    essay shows what a lot of people are going through in this days generation; having the hard time what to do is right in terms of moral when the world complies us to uphold. As has been mentioned, Orwell literally abandons his morals and kills the elephant to have the approval of the Burmese and not to be laughed at be looking like a fool. Orwell speaks of himself when he says, “it is the condition of rule that he shall spend his life in trying to impress the natives” (515). In the same way,…

    • 404 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Decent Essays

    The oppression faced by the Burmese in Orwell's "Shooting an Elephant" and by the African natives in Lessing's "No Witchcraft for Sale" made them virtually defenseless to the whims of the whites with whom they lived. In "Shooting an Elephant", the persecuted Burmese sneered and mocked the British officers, including the narrator. This is because it is all they could do. If they tried to rebel to any greater extent, they would be severely punished, possibly even killed. As seen in the story, the…

    • 359 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Good Essays

    William Shakespeare and the short story, Shooting an Elephant (1936) by George Orwell, these texts effectively portray the power of discoveries, capable of altering one’s perspectives. Discoveries may be difficult to overcome as there are often barriers preventing the individual from accepting their unexpected discoveries. In The Tempest, Prospero conjured up a storm, bringing…

    • 1170 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    always the case. In “Shooting An Elephant” and “Singing Silence” both characters have values that are dealt with in different ways more so than similar. In both stories values are put under stress. In “Shooting An Elephant” the main character lacks honor. Stress was put on this value, and it did not last. “I've only done this to avoid looking like a fool”(Orwell) He said this, because he didn't stand up for himself like others might think, but killed the elephant. When stress was put on this…

    • 671 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    The first T-Shirt is designed according to the idea of protection in Elephant Run. During the Second World War, the Imperial Japanese Army invades Burma, a small British colony located in Southeast Asia. Nick Freestone, the protagonist has recently immigrated to Burma to live on his father’s plantation away from the German air raids in London, England after his own apartment was bombed. Soon after Nick’s arrival, however, the Japanese invade, and capture the Freestone plantation, forcing “[a]ll…

    • 374 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Page 1 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 50