Ego psychology

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    The Id

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    the child to identify himself with the moral precepts of his parents. This identification with the parents results in the formation of the superego” (46). Freud dissected the superego and found that there are two components that create the superego. The superego’s two parts—ego-ideal (child’s conception of right) and conscious (child’s conceptions of wrong)—both are influenced by the internalization by the parents. Children adopt the moral codes of their parent as an act of desperation to stabilize their connection and closeness with the parents. Freud describes the superego as pertaining to both the conscious and unconscious mind that develops a reward or punish system, which depends on a person’s actions according to his moral code. The superego want a person to follow the virtuous path that it deems fit. However, the superego is extremely sensitive and can act irrationally at the slightly action against the moral code, even something as minuscule as thought can be punished through ailment, injury, or loss of memory. The dangers of…

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    The id is the impulsive part of one’s psyche and it responds to one’s instincts. It operates under the pleasure principle, which is the idea that every impulse should be immediately satisfied. On the other hand, the ego is the balanced decision making component of the psyche. It works out realistic ways to satisfy the id’s demands. The ego considers social realities and norms and decides how to properly behave. Finally, the superego works to control the id’s impulses and to persuade the ego to…

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    The Sun Also Rises Quotes

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    established the idea that the mind is composed of two main components: the conscious, and unconscious (Boeree 29). The id is a part of the unconscious mind and includes the motivation caused by an organism’s needs and instincts, working with the pleasure principle to take care of itself immediately (30). Freud argued that the mind is also composed of a superego and ego portion that represent consciousness and morality (30). The id is seen in the novel through drinking, as all of the characters…

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    turned to psychology to understand a patient which didn’t fit into any medical diagnosis. This case would prove to be a turning point in Freud’s career. He would go on to develop many theories of the human mind and be considered the father of psychoanalysis. One of his most enduring theories is that of human consciousness. Freud’s theory described human consciousness to be likened to an iceberg; the small exposed tip being our consciousness and the vast structure underwater representing our…

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    Yaqui Deer Dance

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    Sigmund Freud originated the theory that our personalities are made of an id, ego and super ego. The id is pure desire, the super ego is made up of society’s rules and the ego develops out of our choices between our desires and the rules placed on us. Babies and children don’t have a super ego yet, they do everything they can to get what they want, and so does Wohpekumeu; he is pure id. Whenever Wohpekumeu wants food or companionship, he seeks it out and tricks as many people as he needs to in…

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    Perspective Midterm

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    change and I wanted him to be here forever. 2. Describe in detail how you used your super ego and ego with two (2) of the defense mechanisms described in the lecture of the class. Describe detailed examples of that struggle specifically during and in this class: HSERV 302. I have used my super ego with silence as my defense mechanism in class. For instance, during a class exercise when we had to listen, observe, and talk about stressors in our life. I used silences as my defense mechanism and…

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    Diana Nyad Case Study

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    In contrast to Erickson’s theory Sigmund Freud’s differentiation of ego functioning in Erickson’s study was easy for me to disagree with. Nyad exhibits ego tendencies I believe is of relevance to the outcome of the crisis she experienced. Her ego developed from working hard against all the odds of the sea creatures and overcoming her assault. In Erickson’s theory, he explains the ego is more a matter of the self as Nyad shows where Freud explains it to function per the reality principles where…

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    Naturalism unlike realism adopts more a philosophical position and holds man responsible for his actions and negates divine interventions. Naturalism considers human beings to be determined by their heredity and environment. The individual is at the mercy of determining social and economic forces. Each human being is determined by heredity and environment and "subject to the social and economic forces in the family, the class, and the milieu into which that person is born" (Abrams 153).…

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    Courtney's World

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    different little stories. All of the stories play a major key to the psychological strategy that is presented in many of them. These stories include Food or Drink, Work or Play, and Rant. Which, allows us to take a closer view at them using Freud’s ID, Ego, and Super-ego concept. Freud being one of the most influential people of the twentieth century allow his view on how the works to be very important. When looking at the Id it focused on the nature of the child and wants. The ego helps with…

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    Fight Club: An Exploration of Identity Our society is full of people who have an inner desire to be perceived differently from how the world perceives them. David Fincher’s Fight Club portrays the struggle of identity and perception through the narrator’s character, who, ironically, is never assigned a name throughout the film. The narrator undergoes a shift from initially having a complete disconnection from the real world to adopting a second identity or alter-ego (“Tyler Durden”) that allows…

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