Earl Warren

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    Chief Justice Earl Warren Many Supreme Court Justices have left behind some type of legacy. John Marshall for instance, through the Marbury v. Madison case he was able to confirm the establishment of judicial review- the ability of the Supreme Court to limit congressional power by declaring legislation unconstitutional. In his paper, I will be focusing on former Supreme Court Justice, Earl Warren. This paper explains his early life, law practices, and the legacy he left behind. Earl Warren was born in a traditional household whose values revolved around the importance of a good work ethic and education. Urged by his father, warren started school earlier than most children. Warren worked at his father’s job every summer since he was nine. His father worked as a railroad mechanic. There he was exposed to corruption and political dominance, that shaped his career. Few kids around that age worked unless they had to support their families. “The percentage of male children working at the ages of 10-14 in 1900 was 26.1 percent.” (Carter and Sutch, 1995).Based on Warren’s father decisions, it is easy…

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    His body lay in state in the foyer of the Supreme Court Building – the first time such a ceremony had taken place on the death of a Supreme Court justice. Ironically, his enemy, President Richard Nixon attended his funeral and then resigned the presidency on August 9, 1974. Earl Warren was buried on July 12, 1974 with military honors at Arlington Ceremony. Earl Warren’s legacy One of Earl Warren’s core beliefs was that public office was to be treated as a public trust. He was one – perhaps one…

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    Warren court was a time full of life changing events, whether they were good or bad they affected everyone. Changes were being made quite frequently to civil rights, judicial and federal powers. The Warren court was known for several different things such as: ending racial segregation, putting a stop to prayer in public schools, making the right to privacy very clear through the constitution, and much, much more. Without the Warren court, there is no say on how the United States would be right…

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    Justices Jackson and Reed finally decided to drop their dissent. The final decision was unanimous. Warren drafted the basic opinion and kept circulating and revising it until he had an opinion endorsed by all the members of the Court. The Clark Doll Experiment (1939) was an experiment done by Dr. Kenneth Clark and his wife Mamie where they asked black children to choose between a black doll and a white doll. The dolls were the same except for their skin color but most thought the white doll was…

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    Warren Court Era Analysis

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    This class has been a very fun and enjoyable experience in learning about the very important Warren Court Era. The Warren Court has led the way for variety of changes in the United States of America through landmark decisions like Brown v. Board of Education and Miranda v. Arizona. A very interesting thing that I learned was that Earl Warren was appointed by Dwight D. Eisenhower with the intent that Warren would be a very conservative judge, but as cases were presented to the Supreme Court the…

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    inner-city youths in America. The War On Drugs in America was used to criminalize black people so that their voice did not mean anything to America. Nixon set this plan in motion 45 years ago, and the effects are still being felt to this day. Many children have suffered drastically because of the War On Drugs Lomenshia Pastran 2 because they are being raised…

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    used these in its decisions to greatly affect the country, from Brown v Board of Education (1954), to Roe v Wade (1973), to this very summer, with Obergefell v Hodges (2015). These landmark cases demonstrate sweeping social change through the use of the Court system, and were typical of those enacted during the Warren court. Baker v Carr (1962), a case that deals with the issue of apportionment, is one of the Warren court’s sweeping decisions. It shattered precedent by setting a standard for…

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    the poor should bear responsibility for their own situation. A justice with firsthand experience with corporations or the military or government bodies (to choose just a few examples) may have a deeper understanding of both their strengths and their weaknesses. In the end, it seems difficult to support the conclusion that a justice’s politics are the sole (or even the primary) influence on his or her decisions. There are simply too many instances in which justices surprise their appointing…

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    Segregation Pros And Cons

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    Little Rock’s high schools, rather than let integration take place. The schools would not reopen until 1960, but only two African American students would be permitted entry that year. It would take many years before Little Rock was fully integrated. Melba Pattillo’s journey through the Central High School system came about as the result of one of the most famous Supreme Court cases in American history: the 1954 Brown vs Board of Education of Topeka, Kansas case which abolished school…

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    Earl Warren and the Change of Society Earl Warren wanted to help African Americans society during segregation. He worked on cases that would integrate whites and blacks. Earl Warren’s decisions were life changing for many blacks and opened up a lot of educational doors. Earl Warren was the judge for the Brown v. Board case in 1954. The Congress which proposed amendment supsequently provided for segregated schools in the District of Columbia. Congress wanted to keep schools and every part of a…

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