Domestication of the horse

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    The Impact of the Horse When the domestication of animals originated, the main purpose was food production. With an ever changing world environment, having a herd could be the difference between life and death. As time passed, however, the human species began to realize the folly in their ways. Not only could animals be raised for food, they could be raised for other useful byproducts: milk, clothes, and many other products necessary to life. Inevitably, the need for animals that were more considerable in size was recognized (Fagan, 2011). Bred eventually for specialized tasks, the horse has been idolized ever since. Although many animals had been domesticated before the horse, it marked a significant turning point for mankind. Domestication…

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    led the Spaniards to success. Although others may disagree, Diamond’s theory is most effective when focused on Europeans’ animal domestication, specifically their use of horses…

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    Stages Of Domestication

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    Domestication has played an enormous part in the development of humankind and material culture. It has resulted in the appearance of agriculture as a special form of animal and plant production. It is precisely those animals and plants that became objects of agricultural activity that have undergone the greatest changes when compared with their wild ancestors. Origins Of Domestication The main attempts at domestication of creatures and plants evidently were made in the Old World amid the…

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    Domestication Benefits

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    Domestication was a key breakthrough in the lives of people living around 10,000 BCE and has been making human life better ever since. The introduction of domestication into human thinking had economic, social, and political effects on the way people lived. The effects of domestication have been extremely beneficial to the growth and improvement in the quality life people have lived about 12,000 years ago up until present day. The first people to adopt domestication were the people living in…

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    Neolithic Domestication

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    transition happened in different parts of the world at different times. We call this period the Neolithic or Agricultural Revolution. The Neolithic Revolution might not have happened in parts of the world if not for three very key factors; the domestication of plants, the availability of animals, and geography. Although the availability of animals helped to advance societies development into an agrarian society, it is overshadowed by the greater importance of the…

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    through domestication, or rather, artificial selection. With the example of domestication, however, there is a potential obstacle as to the validity his theory. Fleeming Jenkin presents this obstacle by saying Darwin’s theory “rests on the assumption that natural selection can do slowly what man’s selection does quickly” (Jenkin, pg. 3). And further, in artificially selecting traits to be bred in animals, “the rate of variation in a given direction is not constant, is not erratic; it is a…

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    Sentences like this made me appreciate his writing even more because he always cuts to the point. In our history book, it gives approximately 3 paragraphs in the book about the domestication of plants and animals, which is just a small dent in our 30+ page chapters. While in Jared Diamond’s writing, he wrote over 4 pages just about the domestication of animals. “Big domestic mammals further revolutionized human society” (Diamond 90). Diamond discussed the domestication of animals and the leads…

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    turning point in human history, plant and animal domestication has influenced our present-day lifestyle from the foods we eat to the languages we speak. Starting from its earliest ground, the Fertile Crescent, the act of domesticating plants and animals has been so ingrained in our modern world that the origins of domestication come unexpectedly. Although domestication is a widespread process today, it was rather unpopular with early peoples. Farmers back then had no model of domestication, and…

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    Domestication of animals required proximity between humans and the herds. Thus, animal-borne diseases like smallpox, flu, measles, chicken pox, malaria, tuberculosis, and rabies destroyed people groups who did not have a strong immune system (Strayer 61). For example, the original Paleolithic groups who were living in the southern and eastern parts of Africa were unable to survive the animal-borne diseases. When the Bantu-speaking peoples of Midwest Africa traveled there and spread their…

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    New Guinea Research Paper

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    Europeans continues to develop more than the New Guineans because they have greater access to resources. The New Guineans have always been disadvantaged because the Europeans have mastered the method of animal domestication and gathering. It is hard for New Guineans to develop animal domestication because pigs are the only animals they can access. The Europeans developed because of the Middle East. 13,000 years ago the middle east had lots of food supply and humid. There were more forests,…

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