Domestication

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    Stages Of Domestication

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    Domestication has played an enormous part in the development of humankind and material culture. It has resulted in the appearance of agriculture as a special form of animal and plant production. It is precisely those animals and plants that became objects of agricultural activity that have undergone the greatest changes when compared with their wild ancestors. Origins Of Domestication The main attempts at domestication of creatures and plants evidently were made in the Old World amid the Mesolithic Period. Pooches were first tamed in Central Asia by no less than 15,000 years back by individuals who occupied with chasing and assembling wild consumable plants. The main effective training of plants, and goats, dairy cattle, and different creatures—which…

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    Dog Domestication Research

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    Through domestication such partnerships were built and animals began to depend on us, humans to survive. Our longing for affection has made us build and…

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    change in heritable characteristics of biological populations over successive generations. It is the process that gives rise to variation in existing populations, drives speciation, and what leads to the extinction of new species. It is the natural change that occurs in response to environmental pressures resulting in phenotypical changes. Another way for phenotypical changes to occur in a species is by human intervention. Domestication is a form of human intervention. The domestication of…

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    Animal Domestication Essay

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    Domestication of plants leads to further disturbance of other non-human species. Because plant domestication increases detrimental herbivore activities, humans started to utilize more chemicals. To control the pest population and increase crop yield, humans use chemically charged pesticides and fertilizers. The use of pesticides creates a vicious cycle between the domesticated plants and the herbivores. When farmers use pesticides, farmers are encouraging the pests to be more resilient to the…

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    As seen in the Economic Anthropology video that we watched in class, the Achanti in Ghana go to the markets to buy and sell goods. Only women participate in this in their culture. A monetary exchange system allows for a society to have social inequality, individual ranking and class stratification. All of these were unintended consequences to domestication. We now live in a world where so many things are defined by their monetary value. For example, in the video The Story of Stuff, people who…

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    Patriarchal- a society dominated by men. Egalitarian- a society based on the belief of equality of all people. Pastoralism- a society whose primary practice is herding of animals. Hunter and Gatherers- humans who obtain all of their food by hunting animals and gathering edible plants. Venus figurines- statuettes that portray women with exaggerated reproductive organs to represent fertility. Specialization of labor- the division of labor/jobs to produce large numbers of goods in a shorter…

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    Our past matters just as much as our future. Thousands of years ago the world was a lot different than it is now. The Neolithic Revolution was and still is a major turning point in human history for multiple reasons because of many causes and effects. During ancient civilization, there were many events that led to the Neolithic Revolution. This included climate change, the need for food, cultivation of crops, and domestication of animals. When the Ice Age ended, there was an increase of…

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    is also used, and concludes that there is evidence in Northern Syria that seeds such as wild barley actually began processing up to 1,000 years before “the beginning of systematic cultivation of domestication”(Gross, 2013, 668). Finally, Gross employs the research of Amy Bogaard who was able to use “isotopic distributions of nitrogen and carbon to demonstrate that Neolithic farmers in Europe applied manure to their fields,” instead of the earlier concepts that we ate more red meat (Gross, 2013,…

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    Animal domestication affects the development of a civilization because the geographic locations that don’t have as many animals suited for domestication have to do all the farming by hand, don’t have a source of transportation,and don’t have access to all the resources civilizations get from domesticating animals. In order to domesticate an animal there are certain features it needs. The first thing an animal needs is a dominance hierarchy, if humans can control the herds leader they can control…

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    different courses for different peoples because of differences among people’s environments, not because of biological differences among people themselves”. This statement by Diamond tells us that it is not in our nature-self that we have inequality among ourselves, but is due to our surrounding environment and geographical factors. To start off the book, Diamond took Pizarro and the Incas as an example of differences in societies in history. Although having a significant disadvantage, Pizarro…

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