Disease model of addiction

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    The disease model is based on a predictable process that are fused into three constructs, i.e. organ, defect, and symptoms which defines addiction as a disease (Pleasure Unwoven, 2016). Likewise, Brooks & McHenry (2009) describes a disease as a predictable array of signs of illness or problems, i.e. loss of control increase in substance tolerance, and premature death (if untreated) associated with addiction. The disease model offers clinicians a logical understanding of the affect substances has on the brain that will eventually hijack the brain’s normal sequence of decision notification, i.e. dopamine craving pleasure through substance use and glutamate gives it permission to use substances despite consequences. The psychological rewiring…

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    The criminalization of addiction to drugs and alcohol has impacted society on various levels. Rather than treating addiction as a disease of the brain it is treated as a moral ineptitude that deserves punishment. It is estimated that the United States government spends $51 million a year on drug related arrests and imprisonment (Sledge, 2013). A paradigm shift on how society views addiction and treatment is needed to truly help those suffering from this disease. I would like to consider what…

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    introduction of the brain-disease model of addiction, proponents and opponents have emerged to argue for or against a neurocentric view of addiction and the importance of brain circuitry in treating addiction. The following discussion will discuss the societal pros and cons of labeling addiction a brain disease and evaluate whether brain circuitry is necessary for the treatment of addiction in order to illuminate the benefits and drawbacks of the brain-disease model for individuals, like Dr.…

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    whether addiction is a disease or not I had developed an assumption that the most explanatory model would be the disease model which contradicted my personal view. However upon completing the assigned reading and unit notes that assumption had disappeared and the belief that the blended or biopsychosocial model was the most explanatory model worldwide. Addictions are very complex and experienced differently among people. The stages of addiction can be defined and viewed differently for each…

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    Moral Model Of Addiction

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    5. Explain the models of addiction. (8 points) Addictive behaviors, especially substance abuse, are rampant mental health disorders. The most common additions involve alcohol, nicotine, and illicit drugs, also known as addictive substances. However, addiction can be indentified in gambling, binge eating, and risky sexual behaviors as well. There are significant health and societal costs related to engagement in addictive behaviors. Therefore, it is important to understand addiction issues,…

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    Laaser Sexual Addiction

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    Sexual addiction is a disorder that can have a causing distress to people of difference classes of their life and upbringing. Dr. Laaser, book Healing the Wounds of Sexual Addiction, confirms that people are living a secret life of sexual addiction which some people know they have the problem, but a good amount has no idea what could be happening to them. The strangest thing to this addiction is that it is not happening to one group of people. It does not matter what a person economic…

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    There are three main underlying themes throughout “A Mother’s Desperation”. These underlying themes include the disease model of addiction, the toll addiction takes on families, and the labeling of individuals who suffer from a substance use disorder. The majority of this documentary was told from a mother’s perspective whose daughter has is battling a current addiction to Opioids. Throughout the documentary the mother attended a support group for families of addiction and it became clear of the…

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    Model Of Addiction

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    The traditional model of addiction treatment is rooted in the concept of an addiction as a disease, proposed in the late XVIII century by Benjamin Rush. The theory was later strengthen by professor Elvin Jellinek, popularized by the philosophy of Alcoholics Anonymous, applied to The Minnesota Model, the dominant form of addiction treatment in the USA, and finally used by the American Society of Addiction Medicine to create a formal definition of an addiction (Meyer, 1996). According to ASAM,…

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    the grips of their addiction? No, absolutely not. It is important however as a treating professional to know exactly what a relapse is, triggers that may lead to a relapse, the signs and symptoms associated with relapse, and the different models in which relapse is described. As defined by Miller and Harris in their journal A Simple Scale of Gorski’s Warning Signs for Relapse, there are two terms used to describe a recovering addict’s return to substance use (e.g., alcohol and/or drugs) or…

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    Disease or Choice Disorder? Philip L. Fischer Indiana University Purdue University Indianapolis Addiction – disease or choice? This debate is far more complex than many imagine. For us to even understand the discussion, we must have understand the terms. Addiction is commonly used as an equivalent for dependence which, according to John Jung, is “the state in which the user no longer seems to be able to control his or her usage… a strong physiological or psychological need…

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