Dialect continuum

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    The issue of dialect and education and, in particular, what dialect is correct to use in the classroom has generated a debate in schools. “Linguistic research defines a dialect, or language variety, as a variety of a language that is associated with a particular regional or social group.” Contrary to popular belief, dialect is not a lesser or ungrammatical way of speaking. All dialects are logical even though they may vary in pronunciation, grammar, or vocabulary (Godley, Sweetland, Wheeler, Minnici & Carpenter, 2006). Some people may say standard dialect is the only way, people may say that it’s best to welcome non-traditional dialects or, some think that having bi-dialectal classrooms is the best and benefits all students. Bi-dialectal means…

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    conflicts that occur due to selfish reasons. As the Bible says in Romans 12:18 NIV, “if it is possible, as far as it depends on you, live at peace with everyone.” Just as there is a difference between debating and bickering, organization members should understand distinctions between causes of conflicts. By using analysis tools examining Conflict and Negotiation Processes in Organizations and the Conflict-Intensity Continuum, management can better determine causes and processes within conflict.…

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    Rowland Dr. Wachter English 101-010 15 February 2016 Continuous Bliss “Say what you need to say,” John Mayer stated within Say, a 2006 well established hit-single of Mayer’s, and he most certainly followed up those exact words four days later with his album release of Continuum. This is an ardent, smooth album where Mayer elegantly combines his passion for rhythm and blues with his sincere knack for inventing unforgettable melodies and strongly put-together songs. Through this album, Mayer…

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    definitely variation due to the red/yellow colour that stays in the cape regions so therefore proves that there is variation within the isiXhosa language. However, as for the last two maps which display the words “Kum/Kumi” and “Umtwana wam”, there is very little or no variation at all. These words are widely spoken throughout the South of Africa. The only slight variation that happens to be is by the KwaZulu-Natal areas and most of the time these words are spoken near the coast lines. Nearly…

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    their language. This then blended into Old English. Old English gradually became more and more French, borrowing French words and grammar, until it eventually became Middle English. Without the Normans, the English we know today wouldn 't exist. II. 1 A dialect is a way of speaking, characterized by accent an pronounciation, grammar and syntax, and slang. A dialect is usually confined to one geographic location. The Appalachian dialect is a very melodic, flowing dialect. It contains…

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    Anzaldúa is a “Chicana” woman and famous novelist, and in “How to Tame a Wild Tongue,” discusses the mixing of various dialects such as Spanish and English to create a new melting-pot language called Chicano. Chicano can be further categorized into regional dialects, which result in different types of Chicano due to the way English and Spanish are spoken in these areas. Further, Anzaldúa describes a system that attempts to assimilate Chicanos so they no longer have accents or speak their…

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    “This African American Vernacular English shares most of its grammar and vocabulary with other dialects of English. But it is distinct in many ways, and it is more different from Standard English (SE) than any other dialect spoken in continental North America.” (Pullum, 39). African American English is in fact a form of Standard English (SE), and can be considered…

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    Multi-dialects, Confusion, English? A Bavarian priest tried to create the first universal language in the year 1880 and he called it Volapük. A language that was taken from the existing French, German and English, and was difficult to learn. It consisted of odd sounds and case endings similar to Latin. It did not take long before a new language emerged (McWhorter). This new language was a blend of words from India and Europe. It became known as Esperanto. Regardless, of this fact Esperanto was…

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    The short essay of “Mother Tongue” by Amy Tan emphasizes the different Englishes she uses to communicate with her family and at her professional environment; therefore she explains the differences between non-Standard English and Standard English. Tan views non-standard English as her mother tongue language because her family can communicate better with her. She views Standard English as the formal way to communicate with professional people in a daily basis. English is the formal language in…

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    looks but also by their language use. People distrust those who are different from them. Even in everyday life, school children want their fellow students to speak English not Spanish so that they can make sure that no one is gossiping about them. Baldwin explains this phenomenon by writing that language “reveals the private identity, and connects one with, or divorces one from, the larger, public, or communal identity.” Speaking different whether an accent or an entire language causes the…

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