Dental fluorosis

Decent Essays
Improved Essays
Superior Essays
Great Essays
Brilliant Essays
    Page 1 of 50 - About 500 Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Dental Fluorosis

    • 1099 Words
    • 5 Pages

    Enamel is the hardest substance in the body, which it has to be to endure the biting forces of everyday mastication and clenching that people often put their teeth through. Enamel is the outer layer on the crown of the tooth which give the teeth that is esthetically pleasing to the eye. However, enamel is not able to replenish itself so once it is gone there is no way for the body to regenerate more. A 12-year-old female girl has new molars coming in and the appearance of them is a yellowish-brown color with white specks, the parent is concerned that something may be wrong because they do not look like any of the other teeth within the girl’s mouth. Due to the coloring of the crowns, and the age of the girl dental fluorosis could be the possible…

    • 1099 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    drinking water to reduce tooth decay” (Fallon). Most communities have fluoridated drinking water. Almost all water contains some naturally occurring fluoride, but at levels that are too low to prevent tooth decay (Center for Disease Control). Many communities adjust the fluoride concentration in their water supply to a safe recommended level to reduce tooth decay and promote good oral health. All communities should have fluoridation in their public drinking water supply for numerous reasons. The…

    • 1693 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Dental Toothpaste Analysis

    • 1395 Words
    • 6 Pages

    Dental caries, or cavities as we more commonly know them as, is the erosion of the teeth due to bacteria. The prevalence of dental caries has risen over the past few years, and now affects between 60-90% of schoolchildren and a large number of adults in the population (Harding & O’Mullane, 2013). This is a significant number of the public that is affected by this condition. In the United States, this is the most common chronic disease affecting young children, and if it does untreated it can…

    • 1395 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    internationally? Water fluoridation refers to the controlled addition of fluoride to a public water supply to reduce tooth decay, usually accomplished by adding sodium fluoride, fluorosilicic acid or sodium fluorosilicate to water of which fluorosilicic acid is the most common. Fluoride helps to protect our teeth by a variety of ways such as altering the structure of developing enamel and encouraging remineralisation ensuring that the enamel crystals are laid down are of improved quality.…

    • 286 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Some cities in the United States have begun to consider adding the chemical fluoride into their water. Supposedly this action would reduce tooth decay and dental cost. Fluoridated water has been consumed throughout the years, however, it has recently been viewed as an outdated method. Portland, along with other Oregon communities, have also begun to discuss the idea of fluoridating their tap water. While people may support this concept, others believe it is ineffective and dangerous. It has…

    • 275 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    many risks with consuming the water. The risks include risks to the body. Supplementing fluoride to public water services is unethical and creates risk to a person’s dental and overall health. When fluoride is added to public water services, all people that use that water services are “medicated” with fluoride. Some people say that “it is an unethical form of mass-medication, without each individual’s consent or knowledge (Main).”…

    • 1300 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Pros And Cons Of Fluoride

    • 1764 Words
    • 8 Pages

    The amount of people receiving fluoridated water has risen 400% in the past 50 years, yet America’s dental cavity rate is higher than countries who do not fluoridate their water. Fluoride has been called the greatest public health achievement of the 20th century, but still there is no proven effect to the American people's teeth. So, why than is 66.3% of the U.S. population receiving fluoridated water and why are taxpayers paying millions of dollars to put a harmful chemicals into their water?…

    • 1764 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    People assume that fluoride only affect areas of dental health. However with extensive research, we have found that even with low levels of fluoride, can lead to a range of health problems. This included bone fractures, thyroid disorders, impaired brain function and can even disrupt blood sugar levels. Dental fluorosis, defined by discoloration, blackened or chalky white teeth, is an obvious indication of overexposure to fluoride during childhood when the teeth are still developing. In fact for…

    • 495 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    is a common practice in many communities, both in the United States and worldwide. In 2012, 75% of American communities had access to fluoridated drinking water (Center for Disease Control and Prevention, 2015). The CDC also touts the many advantages of fluoridated drinking water, such as lowered tooth decay among families and fewer dollars spent on dental procedures. However, many individuals and medical institutions have spoken out against water fluoridation. There is much controversy…

    • 1575 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Great Essays

    Since its introduction in the 1940’s, the practice of fluoridating water supplies has been a hotly debated topic. Although being hailed by the CDC as one of the top 10 public health achievements of the 20th century, water fluoridation has been heavily criticized by governments, scientists and even dentists from its inception. With fluoride’s recent classification as hazardous waste, fluoridation policies have come under renewed scrutiny. While there is no question that excessive amounts of…

    • 1389 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Previous
    Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 50