Dental fluorosis

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    Dental Fluorosis

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    Enamel is the hardest substance in the body, which it has to be to endure the biting forces of everyday mastication and clenching that people often put their teeth through. Enamel is the outer layer on the crown of the tooth which give the teeth that is esthetically pleasing to the eye. However, enamel is not able to replenish itself so once it is gone there is no way for the body to regenerate more. A 12-year-old female girl has new molars coming in and the appearance of them is a yellowish-brown color with white specks, the parent is concerned that something may be wrong because they do not look like any of the other teeth within the girl’s mouth. Due to the coloring of the crowns, and the age of the girl dental fluorosis could be the possible…

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    Pros And Cons Of Fluoride

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    The amount of people receiving fluoridated water has risen 400% in the past 50 years, yet America’s dental cavity rate is higher than countries who do not fluoridate their water. Fluoride has been called the greatest public health achievement of the 20th century, but still there is no proven effect to the American people's teeth. So, why than is 66.3% of the U.S. population receiving fluoridated water and why are taxpayers paying millions of dollars to put a harmful chemicals into their water?…

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    many risks with consuming the water. The risks include risks to the body. Supplementing fluoride to public water services is unethical and creates risk to a person’s dental and overall health. When fluoride is added to public water services, all people that use that water services are “medicated” with fluoride. Some people say that “it is an unethical form of mass-medication, without each individual’s consent or knowledge (Main).”…

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    Dental Toothpaste Analysis

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    Dental caries, or cavities as we more commonly know them as, is the erosion of the teeth due to bacteria. The prevalence of dental caries has risen over the past few years, and now affects between 60-90% of schoolchildren and a large number of adults in the population (Harding & O’Mullane, 2013). This is a significant number of the public that is affected by this condition. In the United States, this is the most common chronic disease affecting young children, and if it does untreated it can…

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    Since its introduction in the 1940’s, the practice of fluoridating water supplies has been a hotly debated topic. Although being hailed by the CDC as one of the top 10 public health achievements of the 20th century, water fluoridation has been heavily criticized by governments, scientists and even dentists from its inception. With fluoride’s recent classification as hazardous waste, fluoridation policies have come under renewed scrutiny. While there is no question that excessive amounts of…

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    Water Fluoridation Essay

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    New Zealand Community Water Fluoridation: Is It Justifiable? Dental caries (tooth decay) is a chronic disease that affects all ages, and remains one of the most predominant diseases in New Zealand. If left untreated, possible ramifications could include, tooth loss (which may result in an undesirable appearance), pain, and infection. Therefore from an early age, it is essential to establish and implement good oral health practices. Examples of these practices (although not limited to) are,…

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    free to consume and is natural. Despite the continual support for fluoride within dental, medical and scientific communities, there is marked opposition by the general public and a minority of scientists. Through a critical analysis of both the benefits of water fluoridation and its supposed disadvantages, it can be seen that its relevance and vitality for maintaining oral health is stagnant. Dental caries is a common cause of acute preventable hospital admissions in Australia, and the addition…

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    your dental health. Dental and skeletal fluorosis can be side effects of water fluoridation, however both of these are rare. Dental fluorosis is described as pitting and staining of teeth in children mainly, while skeletal fluorosis can lead to a higher risk of bone fractures. Both of these stem from exceeding levels of fluoride that can cause vomiting, nausea, abdominal pain, and possibly seizures. “One of the debated concerns regarding community water fluoridation is that the…

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    measure to reduce tooth decay and it is important for oral health especially the teeth. Natural water contains a small amount of fluoride but it is limited and insufficient to provide a significant change in the improvement of oral health. Water fluoridation adds fluoride to public water and it is adjusted to between 0.7 - 1.0 parts per million in drinking water which is deemed the most effective and efficient way of preventing dental caries (tooth decay). Public health authorities around the…

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    in poverty or are low income. There are three areas my group and I will be focusing on throughout this project. In this paper specifically, I will touch upon dental hygiene. Our goal is to provide awareness that hygiene can greatly affect one’s overall health. Our interventions include presenting this in a creative way to elementary students so that they are able to learn why hygiene is so important. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2009), tooth decay and…

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