Corporate crime

Sort By:
Decent Essays
Good Essays
Better Essays
Amazing Essays
Best Essays
    Page 1 of 50 - About 500 Essays
  • Good Essays

    Corporate Crime

    • 586 Words
    • 3 Pages

    and organized crime. On the other hand, what about a peanut company who add the wrong mixture by mistake and instead of degrading it, they continue to proceed to sell it on the market. While doing so they end up kill six people. This would be an example of and corporate crime. Over all in both crimes, they end up killing someone in the process right. Are organized crime and corporate crime the same? What are some examples of organized crime and corporate crime? How can organized crime and…

    • 586 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Amazing Essays

    Academics find it difficult to analyze corporate crime because large scale survey data is not available so researchers have to rely on non-objective crime statistics collected by ‘impartial’ government agencies such as StatsCan or the Home Office which usually yield tiny samples (Snider, 2005; pg 186). Corporations do not want sociologist investigating their business practises, unlike traditional offenders they have the ability to resist such incursions. On the other hand, the justice…

    • 3844 Words
    • 16 Pages
    Amazing Essays
  • Good Essays

    Essay Outline White-collar crimes, although not discussed very often, are on rise. When one hears the word crime, they are inclined to think violence or an unethical abuse of some sort. However, people rarely take corporate crimes such as fraud, theft, forgery, or embezzlement into a higher regard, as they do not highly affect the common citizen personally. Studying these executive crimes is important to raise awareness of deceit within society, and to protect and prevent unethical practices…

    • 1228 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    (1. Discuss each of the three factors. Please explain each and discuss why they are associated with corporate crime. The three factors are A) A drive for profit, B) Structure of organization and C) Corporate Culture.) Money drives people to do things that they wouldn’t normally do. Companies especially want to succeed and make money. Some companies set this lofty goal for themselves and simply do not have the ability to live up to them. They strive for something they can’t have. This hunger…

    • 884 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Corporate Crime Analysis

    • 857 Words
    • 4 Pages

    Corporate crime can be classified into different categories using specific characteristics. The first category would be the victims of the crime. Victims of these crimes consists of the general public, the consumers, as well as the people who are employed to work within the lower ranks of these companies. In addition, competing companies can also become a victim to corporate crimes. The second way corporate crime is classified is by determining the destructive action of these corporations such…

    • 857 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    Corporate crime inflicts far more damage on society than all street crime combined. Whether if it’s contributed by injuries, death, or financial lost, corporate crime and violence wins by landslide. The FBI reported that burglary and robbery from street crimes cost the nation an estimate of 3.8 billion a year. In comparison to corporate fraud, it’s a drop in a bucket. The losses from major corporate frauds, such as Enron “swamp the losses from all street robberies and burglaries combined.”…

    • 980 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    Stratton executives were creating a crime-facilitative corporate system. Organizations that are crime facilitative “provide conditions that promote criminal conduct.” This is almost similar to the crime-coercive corporate system that “literally compels others to commit crimes.” Stratton Oakmont did neither based employee success nor reward them on the criminal acts they engaged in. Rather, they presented employees “with extremely tempting structural conditions – high incentives and…

    • 895 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Bruce Maitland Case Study

    • 1485 Words
    • 6 Pages

    Maitland and would be offended with his opposition to the gifts and bribes to stop. There would be a potential for the contracts that are in process to be stopped. There would be no continuation of business with Mr. Maitland’s company due to the unethical behavior being brought to an end. This would be a hard hit to Maitland Motors in the financial department. There would need to be a total reevaluation of how their top revenue source would be replaced. That would also be based on the fact or…

    • 1485 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Why Bribery Is Bad

    • 1065 Words
    • 5 Pages

    Bribery is operationally defined as “the offering, giving, receiving or soliciting of something of value for the purpose of influencing the action of an official in the discharge of his or her public or legal duties” (Lehman & Phelps, 2008). The practice of bribing generally stems from individuals who are ready to use illegitimate channels to capitalize on personal or corporate profit. However, there could be several other mitigating factors that drive people to partake in the act of bribery,…

    • 1065 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    sticks with a person for a long time and has lasting effects in all aspects of life. I understand some would get rich quick and others may choose to take the bribe to avoid personal harm, but I feel that would be the actions of someone acting out of greed and fear. In my experience, people making choices out of greed and fear as opposed to what would be best for themselves or others in the long run usually regret those choices. RESOURCES Gov.uk. Guidance. Overseas Business Risk – Kuwait. May 9…

    • 1450 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Previous
    Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 50