Conceptions of God

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    Philo's Argument Analysis

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    introducing a few examples on why God has either not willed humanity’s happiness or that He does not believe that happiness is an essential component to the human condition. In his first argument, he asserts first that God is a moral being who values traits such a justice, kindness, and mercy. He then states that God’s scope is infinite, and he can perform whatever deeds he so wishes. Finally, he says that humanity is unhappy. This leads to the conclusion that God must not wish for the…

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    of controversy, the main controversial view being her lack of faith; Jane has great doubt in those who are believers of religion as shown during the death of Helen, who is the antithesis of Jane. She questions Helen’s faith in God and asks her “Where Is God?” and “What is God?”.…

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    wondered how does the God look like? I heard people saying testimonies that God spoke to them, they heard the voice of God. But really, Does God speak like normal humans? For me, God is beyond my expectations and he is extraordinary. After reading the article “The Ineffability of God” by Ron Rolheiser, I could easily relate most of the parts mentioned in the article to my life that is, I always escape from thoughts about God’s appearance because I’m confused of being skeptic about God. According…

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    an individual can truly see the limitless boundaries of the horizon. For Elie Wiesel in his work, Night, his boundaries lied at the edge of his hometown of Sighet. At age 16, Elie wanted to expand his horizons by strengthening his relationship with God, and although his father was against Elie taking up spirituality, he went and found himself a tutor in Moishe the Beedle. Months into their lessons, the Gestapo abducted Moishe. Managing to get away, Moishe planned to teach Elie one last lesson of…

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    J. Packer was born in 1926; therefore, he was 47 when he wrote Knowing God. He is a Canadian theologian in Anglican and Reformed traditions. He serves as the Board of Governor’s Professor of Theology at Regent College in Vancouver, British Columbia. Packer received his education from the University of Oxford, Corpus Christi College, Oxford, and Wycliffe Hall. Packer received a Doctor of Philosophy in 1954. He learned under C. S. Lewis, a well-educated theologian. He taught theology as a…

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    lifted. I saw the world more clearly. The people around me claiming to be devoted followers of God tended to be the most hateful and toxic people that I knew. Nikki Sixx and Corey Taylor showed me that one did not have to be religious to be a good person, and hypocritical Christians were everywhere. I began to see how faulty religious claims could be. The world, to me, made more sense without a God than it ever did when I believed. To be clear, this was a very difficult period in my life.…

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    built up from the material of memories of the helplessness of his own childhood and the childhood of the human race.” (23) Prittie 's anecdote contained the conviction that religion contributes to relief from hardship and, moreover, that a benevolent God intervened to provide him guidance by adopting him as His “child.” Religion is derived from the realization that we are never free from the perpetual vulnerability we experienced as children, because the outside world never ceases to be alien…

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    without a God figure present, as well as the importance of being fully aware in the environments we inhabit for the sake of forgoing the jurisdiction of a supreme being. An attempt was made to emphasize this approach by asking the reader to understand that we as individuals exist in a reality of our own creating, as such we exercise our free will within the confines of a reality that is built upon ideas, experiences, knowledge, method, and a drive to discover. Essentially - the need for God is…

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    and being told that I was worthless to God. There came a time in my life where I placed my eyes on man instead of God. I saw my flawed spiritual leaders as an image of God, and when I was deeply hurt by them, I pushed away from everything that I loved growing up. As a child I was filled with the joy of the Lord and could not imagine life without him. That joy was quickly flushed out when the people I looked up to trampled me telling…

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    He says “Now, children this is a court of law. The law based upon the Bible, and the Bible, writ by Almighty God, forbid the practice of witchcraft, and describes death as the penalty thereof.” (Danforth 1256) The Puritans were very strict and straightforward about religion, and they made it very clear that they do all things by God. Their court of law was also based on the principles of God as they followed the Bible. Sacrificing yourself for your beliefs is important for yourself and for…

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