Cognitive therapy

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    Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, which is also known as CBT is a therapy aimed at challenging negative thought patterns that promote unwanted behavior patterns. Research has shown to be successful in treating many disorders such as depression, anxiety, and psychotic disorders. CBT helps clients to become aware of negative thoughts so you can learn to handle difficult situations more effectively. CBT is widely seen with young adults and an adult; however, research has shown that it can be effective…

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    The central foundations of Cognitive-Behavior Therapy (CBT) can be observed in early literature authored by a variety of scholars and philosophers who observed existing relationships between emotion and thought (Wright, Basco, and Thase, 2006). These earlier contributors include the Stoic philosopher Epictetus. Epictetus’ documented teachings exalted the need for personal responsibility in choosing one’s actions through self-control and logic (Wright, Basco, and Thase, 2006). Essentially,…

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    psychological and pharmaceutical methods. The main psychological treatment is cognitive behavioural therapy (Montgomery 2009, pg. 46). Cognitive behavioural therapy is a talking therapy that manages patient’s problems by influencing and changing the way they think and behave (Muir-Cochrane, Barkway & Nizette 2014, pg. 172). Similar psychological treatments are relaxation therapy and anxiety management (Montgomery 2009, pg. 46). Other therapies are psychodynamic, family, narrative, dialectical…

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    This week’s reflection paper examines the execution of Cognitive Therapy Approach (CAT) intervention, which was presented by Arthur Freeman and a client with depressive symptoms. Throughout the video, Dr. Arthur Freeman highlighted and implemented several intervention techniques such as patients’ agreement and the importance of collaboration and structure. From my perspective, patients’ agreement is a tool for safely treating a patient and meeting them at their level of readiness. During…

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    In the critical meta analysis Borkovec et al. (2002) perform, it is clearly indicated that in cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), that is an empirically backed method of treatment for GAD, often has many faults within the treatment style. Researchers make evident that often the control group comparison is comprised of those on a waiting list for treatment, that the effect size may not be significant enough, and also that individuals ' improvement still does not lie within the range on the…

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    individuals deal with psychological difficulties, they possess unique differences. Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) and Gestalt Therapy are two perspectives that are fundamentally different in their approach to psychotherapy. CBT is a psycho-educational approach that believes therapeutic change is achieved by restructuring cognitive thoughts from dysfunctional to functional (Hickes & Mirea, 2012). Gestalt therapy focuses on awareness and creating real experiences in the present. A great deal…

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    A variety of psychotherapy techniques have been used in group therapy settings. Each theoretical orientation has a variety of techniques that contribute to group work. For the purpose of this assignment, I will be examining the use of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) as the theoretical orientation to guide group work. CBT is a very popular theoretical orientation for individual and group psychotherapy. The techniques used in CBT help a client recognize their maladaptive ways of thinking.…

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    from her parents, and the trauma she endured from her brother. As a result of her complex trauma in childhood, Sarah suffers from anxiety, depression, and posttraumatic stress symptoms, which significantly affects her drug use and emotional and cognitive thought process. (Self Harm) She has engaged in illegal and risky behaviors that have resulted in legal consequences and significant impairments in her interpersonal, social, and family relationships. Adults who are not provided a secure…

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    Cognitive Behavioral Therapy is all about changing the thoughts that a person has and their current way of thinking. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy is a gradual process that helps a person take incremental steps towards a behavior change. There are two steps that are generally used in Cognitive Behavioral Therapy. The therapist begins by helping the patient identify the problematic beliefs that they have. This step is important for learning how feelings, situations, and thoughts can attribute to…

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    Behavior Therapy Behavior Therapy is a form of therapy where the practitioner focus primarily on observable behavior, some of the most well known faces of behavior therapy are B.F. Skinner, Albert Bandura and Arnold Lazarus. (Corey, 2013 pp. 245-246). Behavioral therapy helps promote changes in the individual, it can be tailored to treat clients in their specific needs. Behavior therapy is most often used to treat anxiety disorders, depression, PTSD, substance abuse, eating and weight…

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