Clean Air Act

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    Clean Air Act

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    In the 1960’s the United States started firing up nuclear plants. On June 12, 1960, the Fermi Nuclear Reactor stopped and then restarted. Concerns about safety, and pressure from the unions and the public, the courts completely prohibited further construction on the site; however, the US Supreme Court allows it to restart. A near catastrophic event at the reactor in 1966 proved to show the reason for much concern about nuclear materials. In 1963 Senate Subcommittee created the Clean Air Act to study, and funds for cleanup efforts for all local, state and federal levels. They titled it “The Clean Act: A commitment to Public Health.” The 20th anniversary of the bill was in 1970. It was considered to be the most comprehensive air pollution control in American history. This was also the birth of Earth Day. Both have drawn great attention to the cause. In 1969 the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) drew over five hundred members to bring awareness to the environment. The theme was “Man and his Environment: A View Towards Survival. The conference had multiple…

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    Clean Air Act Of 1963

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    The Clean Air Act of 1963 was similar to the 1955 Air Pollution Control Act in that it did not place heavy restrictions on industry. Rather, it promoted the recognition of the issue of pollution and the threats it faced to the public’s health. It did place emissions standards upon sources such as power generators and manufacturing facilities, however the act neglected mobile sources such as vehicles. The act itself allocated $95 million, about $740 million today, towards research and…

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    Clean Air Act Analysis

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    The Clean Air Act (CAA) was passed in 1970 by Congress in response to an increase of public awareness of air pollution and evidence of public health risks caused by air pollution. The CAA is considered to be a classic example of the “command and control” style of environmental legislation that is characterized by setting environmental goals for the legislation, determining criteria or collecting technical data on the specific health effects of certain chemicals, setting quality standards which…

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    EPA Clean Air Act

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    Assessing the Health Outcomes since the Implementation of Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) Clean Air Act Human beings and environment share a relationship that is very codependent. Their relationship is such that positive or negative disturbance to one can directly or indirectly bring about a change in the other. One prime example of this was the overuse of pesticide in the 1960s which tampered with the earth’s natural state; the abusive use of Dichloro Diphenyl Tricoloro (DDT) poisoned…

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    Over the past 40 years, the Clean Air Act and the Environmental Protection Agency have made several advances in helping reduce air pollution and creating a better nation. Recently, congress has attacked the Environmental Protection Agency, essential tying their hands, for personal gains. In The Clean Air Act, Congress found that the pollution caused by rapidly evolving Cities, industrial development, and motor vehichle use were creating a danger to public health and agriculture. The primary…

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    The Clean Air Act (CAA) is an environmental law made by the U.S. government. This federal law aims at regulating air emissions from stationary sources such as industries and mobile sources such as vehicles. It was established to authorize the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to establish National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) that protects the public health through regulation of emissions that have a hazardous effect on air (Sueyoshi & Goto, 2010). The CAA was established in 1963…

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    Clean Air Act is a federal law that was implemented in 1970. It regulates air emissions mobile to immobile sources. Congress noticed that air pollutants were becoming a growing health concern among the growing public. Hazardous air pollutants pose health risks as well as environmental threats. The new law presents an operating permits program sculpted after a similar program under the Federal National Pollution Elimination Discharge System (NPDES) law. The purpose is to ensure compliance with…

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    Fuel Efficiency Standards for Medium- and Heavy-Duty Engines and Vehicles – Phase 2 that resides under the Clean Air Act. This regulation, is a vague proposal that can potentially hurt the vibrant industry of performance parts from automakers, thus hinder car enthusiasts from converting their normal car into a racecar. This proposed regulation is being over exhausted by the EPA, due to their policy going against already established laws, thus interest groups…

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    Stream Protection Rule

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    I would like to express both my support of the Stream Protection Rule as well as my deep concern over the use of the Congressional Review Act to derail regulations that protect our citizens’ health and setting a precedent to obstruct federal rulings. The Stream Protection Rule is not only relatively modest and commonsense regulation, but has also undergone a thorough stakeholder engagement process. The attempt to dismantle this rule with a Congressional Review Act is unnecessary and will cause…

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    Methane Fracking

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    comes to climate change. Not surprisingly, there is wide disagreement on how much methane is being leaked into the atmosphere as part of the fracking process. In a study at Cornell University, Robert Howarth found that the leak rate of methane was between 4 and 5.6 percent (Stockton). Although industry backers have fielded competing studies that they say completely discredits Howarth's findings a recent report by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration has supported his numbers as…

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