Chromosomal translocation

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    physical traits would include low muscle tone, a single deep crease across the palm of the hand, a slightly flattened facial profile and an upward slant to the eyes. However, just to be sure that the bay does in fact have Down syndrome, karyotype (a chromosomal analysis) is performed. Karyotype is when doctors draw a blood sample to examine the baby’s cells. Once this is done they then photograph the…

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    One mutation in a single human chromosome is all it takes. When a human has an extra copy of chromosome 21, this is referred to a developmental disorder known as Down’s Syndrome or Trisomy 21. An individual with Down’s have three copies of their genes instead of two, therefore disturbing the control of protein production within cells. It is so common and widespread that 1 out of every 800 to 1,000 babies are affected by Down’s Syndrome (FamilyDoctor). This means, according to the article…

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    Cri Du Chat Syndrome Section 1 The genetic disorder Cri Du Chat stems from the deletion of a portion the p arm of chromosome 5 in the affected person. This deletion is seemingly spontaneous in most affected individuals. “Approximately 90% of cases results from a sporadic, or randomly-occurring, de novo deletion” (6. pg. 606). This deletion may include a fraction to the entire loss of the p arm of the fifth chromosome as a whole. Taking into consideration the very spontaneous nature of…

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    Since there is no way to prevent the genetic condition, the only link determined to affect it is the mother's age. The mother's age does not seem to be linked to the type Translocation, most cases are sporadic. In about 1/3 of the cases of translocation, a parent is a carrier for it. The risk of having a second child with translocation is higher if the mother is the carrier. There is only about a 3% chance if the father is the carrier and about 10%-15% chance if the father is the carrier.…

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    Down Syndrome In Children

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    Introduction Children, adolescents and adults suffer from a mental and physical disorder known as Down syndrome. This disorder is due to an extra chromosome in their genes which is the leading cause. However, a specific chromosome can also be damaged during cell replication, which can also increase their risk of getting Down syndrome and other disorders later on in their life that could eventually lead to death if not treated at the right time. Also, if a mother gives birth at a higher age, it…

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    Purpose and Background Cells divide in two ways, mitosis and meiosis. Mitosis is used to produce cells that are genetically identical to the parent cell for growth, asexual reproduction, or repair after injury. Cells that are produced by mitosis are diploid, meaning that they have two complete sets of chromosomes, one from each parent. Meiosis is used to produce haploid cells that have only one set of chromosomes, a mix of chromosomes from both parents. Meiosis produces cells that are…

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    Down’s syndrome is a very common genetic disorder in babies in today’s society. A genetic disorder is a condition that is caused by an absent, an inactive gene or by a chromosomal abnormality (Dictionary, 2016). Down’s syndrome is caused by an extra chromosome 21 in the genome in an individual. The extra chromosome causes moderate intellectual disability. The extra chromosome can also result in an error in cell division. The error is usually prior to fertilization but for some reason nobody…

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    Epigenetic Changes

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    recombination, somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class-switch recombination (CSR) in the immunoglobulin (Ig) genes to generate diverse antibodies and function properly in the adaptive immune response. These rearrangements are frequently accompanied by chromosomal translocations because they are mediated by double strand…

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    Chromosomal Inheritance

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    Chromosomal inheritance relates to how a person has 2 sets of chromosomes, 46 in total, that they inherited their parents. Chromosomes carry the genes, particularly the alleles that the offspring inherit. Gregor Mendel had no understanding of chromosomes when conducting his studies. He experimented and tested peas and discovered that some genes were dominated (showed up) while others were recessive (hidden). What he didn’t know was that chromosomes contained the genes that were responsible for…

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    It affects the lymphatic system, which helps your body fight infections. There are two common types: Sporadic and Endemic. The types differ by the parts of the body affected and the geographic location. Cause: The disorder is caused by chromosomal translocations. It is also associated with impaired immunity. The endemic (African) type is linked to the Epstein-Barr virus, HIV, and malaria. Malaria weakens the immune system’s response to Epstein-Barr, which allows it to change infected B-cells…

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