Childhood psychiatric disorders

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    This body of information has ultimately been collected for a specific reason. The further down the line the information is passed, the further away it gets from the original context and meaning. The initial conductors of the study, which included scientists, had an objective with the purpose to investigate whether the income-to-needs ratio experienced in early childhood noticeably impacts the child's brain development during educational time-spans.. An article in the Magazine JAMA, titled The Mediating Effect of Caregiving and Stressful Life Events, simplifies the study by labeling it. They claim it’s based around stress and the effects of stress on kids, only academically wise and not poverty wise. Consequently, by the time the study makes…

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    Mistrust In Children

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    Has there ever been a time you were at your child’s school and a child had a temper tantrum? Have you ever witnessed a child just being out right unruly and disrespectful to their parent? I know I have, the first thing that came to my mind is that child needs their hind part tore up. We never think of why the child is acting the way they are acting. An untrained eye would believe the child has ADHD; not all children who act out have ADHD. There is a disorder called Disruptive Behavior Disorder…

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    Chloe Namdar English 11 One Flew Over the Cuckoos Nest Essay Ms. Walter 10-14-17 In Ken Kesey's, One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest, the institution ultimately proves to be more powerful than the individual. Throughout the novel, the staff of the institution portrays power and abuse against the patients. In the end of the novel, McMurphy is defeated as the institution killed him inside. “They were taking him through the tunnel. He beat up two of the attendants and escaped. ” (Quote from the…

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    History of Group Work Group work is a wide-ranging training implementing the presentation of awareness and ability in operating a group to support an inter-reliant group of people to accomplish their shared objectives, which may be social, interpersonal, or related to the occupation. The history of group work began in the early 1900’s. There were many theorists who contributed to the evolution of group work. A few will be mentioned from the 1900s and a couple will be mentioned that have recently…

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    The Therapist: Transference and Transparency The Theory and Practice of Group Psychotherapy Therapy is a book written by ( Yalom D. Irving) it serves as a guideline on how to conduct group therapy. Therapy is an element of care that brings about change, however it is critical to note change would never occur without the exchanges that take place between the therapist and the client. In previous chapters, Yalom, instructs us of how to conduct group therapy and what techniques should be…

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    homeless is extremely minimal, many are unknowledgable on the fact that many are mentally ill, and lack the treatment needed to prosper and gain economic stability, causing them to be homeless. During the 1960’s, thousands of severely mentally ill patients living in psychiatric hospitals were released, mostly to the streets, which is known as deinstitutionalization.…

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    The Trans- Alleghany Insane Asylum It started on a weekend in May, our school decided to plan a field trip to a mysterious building in the western part of Virginia. Don’t ask me why though—we’re all surprised they even considered it. The funny thing is, our school hasn’t taken a field trip in three years, and this is the first placed they decided to go to. The whole situation was quite strange. After a class of eighth graders went to a zoo, the principle has not allowed anyone to go on a…

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    Identifying OCD Obsessive-compulsive disorder is a heterogeneous condition that involves unwanted distressing thoughts and compulsive acts (Abramowitz et al., 2003). Repetitive thoughts, images, urges, fears, a need for order, aggressive and sexual impulses, and impulses that are experienced as intrusions that need to be neutralized and suppressed are described as obsessions, which usually is due to the doubt that something has been done correctly (Battling persistent, 2005). The obsessions can…

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    Child Attachment Research

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    Development and Attachment between Father-Child Relationships Attachment refers to the first emotional bond that develops gradually between a child and the parent and which serves to ensure the child's protection and psychological security (Gaumon, 2013). When referring to or speaking of attachment or the emotional bond that a child begins to form in early childhood, it is assumed that it is with the child’s mother instead of possibly the child’s biological father or perhaps just a caregiver.…

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    need treatment are the same people who often refuse to seek out, or take advantage of treatment that is offered to them. The negative relationship between caregivers and persons with mental illnesses began in the 1960s, where forced treatment was commonly used in Canada and around the world. This often brought a life of agony for people seeking treatment as they were subjected to inhumane conditions. The freedom to make choices of your own is thought to be taken away when you accept treatment…

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