Charlie Parker

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    Charlie Parker’s Ill-Fated West Coast Trip Charlie “Bird” Parker is one of the most iconic figures not only in the modern jazz history, but also in the jazz history overall. Charlie Parker had an extraordinary melodic gift and regularly created solos that consisted of ling-lined melodies, each of which was elegant improvised composition unto itself. This gained a wide following among jazz musicians and greatly influenced the Jazz community in the iconic shift is music. Parker’s self-destructive behavior and lifestyle, despite being fatal to the musician ending his life at the age of 34, also attracted a lot of attention of the hipsters, poets, and researchers of the era of late 1940s jazz. As Charlie Parker and Dizzy Gillespie traveled to the…

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    Charlie Parker

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    The jazz musician charlie parker was born on August 29,1920 in kansas city. His father was an african american stage entertainer and his more Addie was a maid chair woman of a native heritage. As an only child charlie moved with his parents to kansas city, missouri he was seven years old. At that time the city was lively center for african american music including jazz and the blues and some gospel charlie was always around music as a kid because of of the town he lived in they always played…

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    player, Charlie Parker. Despite his short life, his contributions to jazz and bebop persist to this day. Charlie Christopher Parker Jr. was born on August 29, 1920, in Kansas City, Kansas, to Charles and Addie Parker, both of whom worked nighttime jobs, while Parker went to school (Megill,…

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    The Bebop Era

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    gradually for public listening as the other styles had" Tanner. Although the ban may have actually helped the development of bebop as musicians would not have to concern themselves with commercially viable records. Therefore giving the opportunity to focus and develop their skills for bebop. There were however, a few influential musicians who were able to produce recordings and albums during this AFM band. The most influential people of bebop would include Billy Eckstine, Charlie "Bird"…

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    Miles Davis was born in the city of Alton, Illinois. At the age of 13 Davis quickly developed talents in playing the trumpet. His father introduced him to this instrument and encouraged him into taking private lessons with a close friend of his that directed music at an art school. By High school he was a professional at playing the trumpet. At the age of 17, a new chapter in Davis’ life unfolded. He was invited by musicians Dizzy Gillespie and Charlie Parker to join as a substitute for a band…

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    essential fundamentals that distinguishes jazz from other genres of music. Through improvisation in jazz, musicians are afforded the opportunity to thrust their level of musical creativity and ability for greater performance. “Artists such as Louis Armstrong, Bix Beiderbecke and others changed jazz from a functional music to a music in which the players were praised for their artistic ability, for their virtuosity, for their inventiveness in improvisation, for an artistic competence, thus, which…

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    styles. The two styles I chose to discuss are bebop jazz and hard bop jazz. Bebop jazz was created in the early 1940’s and consisted of a smaller ensemble of musicians than the previous big bands of the swing era. The typical instruments used were the saxophone, piano, drums, trumpet, and bass. The style was characterized by complex chord progressions and melodies with a strong focus on the rhythm section (A History Of Jazz, n.d.). The groups of bebop would play together at the beginning and the…

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    the child of amateur musicians. His father was a mechanic, and his mother was a housemaid who worked in white homes. Although he was not born into a wealthy family, his unique talents helped propel him into the spotlight. If anything, Tatum proved that it was not impossible to become a world-class extraordinaire despite growing up with limited funds. He was well-known for his songs, “Sweet Georgia Brown” and “Tea for Two,” and he was also commended for his spectacular dexterity and his high…

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    cream to say about me is a mystery” (Chazelle 01:18:10-01:18:24). Fletcher sarcastically adds in the comment about peaches and cream, showing that he realizes that he made many enemies while working at Shaffer. Nieman laughs at this comment which assures us that Fletcher is using sarcasm. Next, Fletcher goes into a monologue of his time at Shaffer: Truth is, I don’t think people understood what it was I was doing at Shaffer. I wasn’t there to conduct. Any fucking moron can wave his arms and keep…

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    song; in the middle of the sung, there was the electronic saxophone sound, like the sax was doing a solo. It was very romantic and danceable. The sixth song started with a keyboard solo for about thirty seconds then the guitar joined in. I remember hearing the keyboard making a sound like a human voice, it was “Boo boo bi da boo pa da pam pam;” I think they used a vocalizer. The song’s names was “Ballyhoo blues,” named after the restaurant itself. It was excited on a 12 bar blues and the melody…

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