Being and Nothingness

    Page 1 of 50 - About 500 Essays
  • Strawson's Revisionist Theory

    claims authorship and responsibility for all of its actions, whatever its ‘situation’ might be” (Santoni, 1995, p.103). In authenticity one accepts the freedom that they have. They accept all of the responsibilities that come alongside the freedom one has in a situation and doesn’t try to disregard it despite what the situation may be. This is especially important in decision making, because unlike in bad faith there are no justifications or excuses that obscure the opportunities for action that are available through our freedom. “Authenticity demands… the recognition that we are without excuses” (Sartre, 1966, p.34). We take the entirety of our choices into our own hands and accept all repercussions. “Authenticity implies an awareness of our being responsible for the direction of our fundamental project, of our life’s orientation” (Catalano, 1980, p.214). We cannot hand off our life’s circumstance to the context, or facticity nor can we fall to our transcendence. One has freedom and one needs to act upon it, with this freedom, with this authenticity one has control…

    Words: 1745 - Pages: 7
  • Gattaca And Behaviorism

    People are able to take a fact about themselves, like Vincent being a faith birth, and turn it around into a different meaning or justification to their actions or lack of actions. Vincent viewed himself as Jerome entirely differently that Eugene does. Vincent is afraid that someone will notice that he is not Jerome, when he expresses these concerns, Eugene says to Vincent “You still don't understand. When people look at you, they don't see you anymore. They only see me.” Vincent becomes his…

    Words: 1293 - Pages: 6
  • John Paul Sartre Existentialism Analysis

    follow orders first and foremost. Often soldiers fight for causes deemed just by their governments, meaning the individual soldier 's opinion on the validity of the war is not considered. In a country with a draft or some other form of mandatory military service, soldiers might be forced to fight a war they do not believe in. These circumstances might lead one to believe that soldiers are not morally responsible for acts committed in war. I will argue that John Paul Sartre’s Existentialism would…

    Words: 1219 - Pages: 5
  • Sartre Being And Nothingness Analysis

    talk about the following: first, I will talk about the nature of Sartre’s concept of bad faith; second, I will talk about what makes bad faith a negation to an authentic self; third, I will present my insight about this topic. In Sartre’s work Being and Nothingness he talks about a particular attitude of a person which draws out a negative impact to one’s own self which he calls bad faith. Sartre’s discussion of this…

    Words: 1180 - Pages: 5
  • Analysis Of Sartre's Being And Nothingness

    The Situation comes in part IV of Sartre’s Being and Nothingness and aims to explain how it is that one can be free in the face of the deterministic nature of our existence. This essay aims to explain how Sartre sees that there are aspects of existence which can be seen to restrict one's freedom, but under an ontological freedom these restrictions are nonexistent. These restrictions are referred to by existentialism as ‘facticitcity’ meaning the objective fact about the external world which are…

    Words: 1684 - Pages: 7
  • Sartre's Being And Nothingness Analysis

    The Situation comes in Part IV of Sartre’s Being and Nothingness and aims to explain how it is that one can be free in the face of the deterministic nature of our existence. This essay aims to explain how Sartre sees that there are aspects of existence which can be seen to restrict one's freedom, but under an ontological freedom these restrictions are nonexistent. These restrictions are referred to by existentialism as ‘facticitcity’ meaning the objective fact about the external world which are…

    Words: 1603 - Pages: 7
  • Jean-Paul Sartre's 'Being And Nothingness'

    Jean-Paul Sartre, in Being and Nothingness, conceives his body as part of his identity, “I am my body … My body is a point of departure which I am and which at the same time I surpass” (qtd. in Butler 38). Judith Butler admits that the body is not fixed or stable. It moves and is in a process of “becoming”. It undergoes a certain change and “is always involved in the human quest to realize possibilities” (38). The glorification of the female body parts brings forth the image of women whose…

    Words: 790 - Pages: 4
  • Jean Paul Sartre Being And Nothingness Summary

    Argumentation: Ownership To have and, if possible, to hold is to be and to do, said Jean-Paul Sartre in his essay Being and Nothingness. "The totality of my possessions reflects the totality of my being," he wrote in 1949. "I am what I have… what is mine is myself." it is seen in societal rule that we are not so much what we think or do but what brand of clothing we have, what car we drive, to the home we live in, but are those things truly ours? Sartre views on ownership is an unhealthy…

    Words: 833 - Pages: 4
  • Spinoza's Twenty Men Argument Analysis

    monistic view of ethics, talking about God and Nature. His main argument is that a personified infinite being is not the transcendent creator of the universe, but it is Nature that determines and governs the system of our existence, hence, nature necessarily means God. Owing to the fact that Spinoza stands against the traditional conception of God, he is regarded as an atheist. However, Spinoza believes that there exists a God and it is the only substance. Hence, everything else that exists…

    Words: 1311 - Pages: 6
  • Analysis Of What Heidegger Means By Being-In-World By Roy Hornsby

    Defining the Being that does the defining, the awareness that is aware, the formless thing that gives form, seems to be an almost impossible task to do through language. Some philosophers arduously endeavor to explain these concepts in convoluted and seemingly clever ways. Making up new names for old terms in an effort to build a new foundation through which the ineffable could be understood. The essay ‘What Heidegger Means by Being-in-the-World’ by Roy Hornsby is a good example of this arduous…

    Words: 1122 - Pages: 4
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