Attachment in children

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    and the people that care for them is attachment. According to (John) Bowlby, children who form an attachment to an adult- that is, an enduring socioemotional relationship- are more likely to survive (Kail and Cavanaugh, 2013). Infants and caregivers tend to have an attachment by the infant’s age of 8-9 months. Attachment takes on many forms, and influences from the environment help to determine its quality. Mary Ainsworth is a researcher that studies attachment. She performed a study based on…

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    Bowlby’s Theory of Attachment to one caregiver This essay will show how John Bowlby believed that one caregiver usually the mother is an important attachment figure and how there is a sensitive period of time to attach to the primary caregiver. He believed children have an innate drive to become attached because it has long term benefits, this innate drive ensures that infants stay close to the caregiver for food and protection. He believed there is a sensitive period for attachments to form,…

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    A Secure Attachment

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    The article, “A Secure Base for Babies: Applying Attachment Concepts to the Infant Care Setting” written by Helen Raikes, talks about the importance and how crucial secure attachment is to not only a child’s parents, but to also their teachers as well. In the article, Raikes brings up many important arguments that clearly prove the necessity of having secure attachments in a child’s life to effectively develop emotionally, physically and psychologically in order to become functioning members of…

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    Avoidant Attachment Theory

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    Attachment is a reciprocal and enduring tie that is formed between two people, particularly between an infant and his or her caregiver. Both parties play a role in the quality of the relationship and the strength of the attachment that follows. Attachment is an important part of life and an adaptive characteristic because it ensures that all of the baby’s needs will be met, including those of physical and psychosocial nature. Many believe that attachment is actually a biological process in which…

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    Attachment Theory Introduction By definition, attachment is ‘a social & emotional bond between infant & carer that spans both time & space’ (Martin, Carlson & Buskist, 2010). Within developmental psychology, attachment theory originated with the work of British psychiatrist John Bowlby, who undertook extensive research into attachment in childhood. Bowlby’s Theory of Attachment Bowlby’s work draws on years of observational psychology analysis which began during his placement at The London Child…

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    Infant Cognitive Development Bonding and attachment are often interchangeable terminology utilized to describe the connection between parents and infants (Redshaw, & Martin, 2013). Often a mother becomes attached to a child simply from the action of pregnancy and feeling the child growing, moving even hiccupping fosters an attachment based on this physical experience (Redshaw, & Martin, 2013). Bonding, however, occurs post birth, this is a bond that is developed within the first hours,…

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    of psychoanalytic and cognitive theories. Relatively ‘sensitive periods’ are focused instead of age-based developmental stages. Attachment theory is the well identified ethological perspective based on early human bonding behaviour. John Bowlby, attachment theory is predominantly based on ethological theory, evolutionary theory and psychoanalytic theory. The attachment theory is a widely used approach for considering individual differences in child adaptation or to cope with a particular life…

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    Notebook Activity #3- Attachment Summary of experience: This notebook activity’s focus was the stages of attachment that children go through. I focused on Bowlby’s Ethological Theory on the four stages of attachment. The first phase, preattachment, is where an infant’s built-in signals, such as grasping, smiling, crying and gazing into an adult’s eyes help bring newborns into close contact with the people around them. The second phase, “attachment in the making,” is where infants begin to…

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    This is a summary of the article “Attachment Theory and Mindfulness” by Rose Snyder, Shauna Shapiro, and David Treleaven in the Journal of Child and Family Studies. In the article, Snyder et al. (2012) begins by providing a brief introduction on two fundamental psychology areas: attachment theory and mindfulness. The authors detail on the significance of early parent-infant relationship on children’s development. For instance, the sources and effects of stress that come with parenting can enter…

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    Early Attachment Styles

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    and late attachment styles has been widely studied and debated for many years. Attachment history has been shown to affect the capacity for emotional regulation, the growth of self-reliance and the emergence of social competence, and is believed to explain the origins of social and emotional behaviour (Sroufe, 2005; Lewis, Feiring & Rosenthal, 2000). Because of these impacts, developmental psychologists have sought to determine if there is continuity between infant and adult attachment styles…

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