Asch conformity experiments

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    The word “conformity” has many negative connotations. It is often thought of as mere mindlessness, or is referred to as “sheep-like.” However, conformity is a useful tool used by people to help them navigate uncertain situations. Conformity, according to Butler and MacManus is the “act of matching attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors to (perceived) group norms” (2000). This can include the way a person acts, dresses, or talks. Such as teenager wearing sagging pants because that’s what he perceives to be “cool,” or the accepted group norm. Over time, a member of a group’s opinions will fall in line with the rest of the group, particularly in situations where the correct decision is unclear, or on matters where they do not have a firm opinion to…

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    study of conformity, Asch (1955) investigated the role of social pressure on individuals’ judgments of a perceptual task. In the task, experimenters showed groups of six to eight participants a vertical reference line and instructed them to pick (from three other lines) which line was most similar to the reference. One of the three lines was clearly correct, while the other two were clearly incorrect. Ideally, the task’s simplicity should have resulted in a low error rate: participants should…

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    Solomon E. Asch’s (1955) experiment on conformity to social pressure puts perspective on how the views of a majority and/or experts can transform the opinion of an individual. Social influences shape every person and that is demonstrated in Asch’s study. The study could be the explanation for numerous social phenomenon’s such as “the spread of opinion to the following of crowds and the following of leaders” (Asch, 1955). His study focuses on the generalised idea that individuals will conform…

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    In 1951, Solomon Asch, a Polish psychologist working in the United States, tested conformity by asking participants to judge the lengths of lines. Asch’s study examined the responses of 123 male American undergraduates to the test. The naïve participant was tested individually among a group of between six to eight confederates, or actors; however, the participant was unaware that the others were not genuine partakers. Asch showed each group of participants two white cards at the same time; on…

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    Milgram’s experiments created great controversy. They showed how vulnerable humans were to the will bending power of authority. This idea especially stuck around the time the experiment took place, the early 1960’s. America was still somewhat fresh off of World War II, and Americans were shocked to see that they were just as capable of being pushed to do things that went against their morals as Germans were under Nazi authorities. Milgram was thorough in his studies by including multiple…

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    An experiment put on by a group of curious scientists to study the logic behind the “genovese syndrome”, named after Kitty Genovese, a 28 year old woman who was brutally stabbed to death outside her apartment building in 1964. She called out for help, her neighbors looked outside their windows, but didn’t help her. Instead they watched from their windows as she died a horrible, painful death. When asked why they didn’t help, most of the watchers said they didn’t want to get involved or they…

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    I'm going to talk about Asch and Milgram experiments and discuss whether or not the groups that knew each other versus the groups that don't, to determine whether or not the groups are more susceptible to conformity.” The Asch conformity experiments were a series of studies that starkly demonstrated the power of conformity in groups.” The Milgram experiment, “was an experiment focusing on the conflict between obedience to authority and personal conscience.” Now that we know what each experiment…

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    Individuals are more likely to conform when someone with more power than them tells them to. This is because they are motivated by the promised perceived or tangible positive or negative consequences the higher power can instate. This hypothesis is supported by a number of existing theories and experiments related to social conformity, particularly The Milgram Experiment and the French and Raven's Bases of Power Theory. Milgram’s experiment, though better known for its Agency Theory of…

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    During the Asch line task, participants need to choose which of the three lines in the right panel match with the length of the line in the left panel. Three confederates would all choose the wrong answer. This task aims to assess whether people will conform to the majority response. The results showed that participants from collectivist cultures tended to show higher level of conformity than individualist countries. In another study (Kanagawa 2001), participants were asked to judge themselves…

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    Cool Hand Luke is a 1967 film centered around a prisoner that refuses to comply with the orders given to him in jail, and thus refuses to conform to the standards of behaviour this institution has attempted to impose upon him. This inmates rebellious character and his many tribulations can serve to compare him to the others. An individual’s behaviour can influence another’s through conformity and rebellion; however, the former comes without consequence and the latter cruel and inhumane…

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