Arguments for and against drug prohibition

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    As if the consequences of alcohol prohibition could not be forgotten soon enough, the 1970s unshackled the ‘safety at any cost’ mentality of policymakers in Washington with a regained sense of restrictive goodwill. Yes, a land world renowned for its respect of individual rights reinstituted coercive public policy historically marred with disaster and unintended consequences. The government of the United States, yet again in denial of bodily autonomy, demonized another inanimate object in an unfortunately familiar fashion. What was alcohol in the 1920s became drugs in the 1970s and 1980s. Instead of respecting individuals’ right to determine what is best for their own lives, the government prohibited the use of these narcotic substances again…

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    Essay On Drug Legalization

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    Drug legalization must occur, not for the sake of the addict, but for the future of America. Certainly, the money invested in the current drug enforcement policies, do not indicate an acceptable return on results or a clear path for resolution. As a result; escalating prison populations, swelling cartel profits, and civil liberty violations dominate urban landscapes. Undoubtedly, any dialogue centering on legalization, must include healthcare reforms and positive social engagement for youth…

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    Miron’s Drug War Crimes: The Consequences of Prohibition, he discusses the current battle with the regulation and legalization of drugs in the United States and provides an analysis of the problems associated with prohibition. One important aspect of this book, which makes it an excellent, read and economic analysis of prohibition is that he plays both sides of the coin, providing arguments for both prohibitionists and people in favor of the legalization. However, his main point is that…

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    Drugs are bad. Very few people need put much thought into it. As long as most people can remember, parents and teachers alike taught them to stay away from drugs, and that the consequences of drug use were tortures unfit for even the worst criminal. Drugs destroy relationships, ruin families, crush ambitions and sometimes even end lives. These truths are all but undeniable, yet there may still be merit in broadening our perspective with regards to the way we handle drugs in America. The…

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    policy around drugs. Most focus mainly on just marijuana and forget about the hard drugs that it tends to get lumped in with. Well, it is due to these hard drugs such as cocaine and heroin that the policy in the United States has been to prohibit them. Why is the policy like it is today? That is mainly attributed to James Q. Wilson, who was part of the National Advisory Commission on Drug Abuse Prevention, while there he wrote the article “Character and Ecstasy: Against the Legalization of…

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    Question 2 Can Marquis’ account of the wrongness of abortion consistently allow for exceptions to a moral sanction against the act of terminating pregnancy? Why or why not? Marquis derives his argument against abortion on the perception of general wrongness of being involved in killing. Killing human beings is wrong because it deprives majority of them from their own future. It can be argued that the account of wrongness of abortion according to Marquis cannot allow for exceptions to carry…

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    Legalization Of Drugs

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    so controversial and diverse. The war on drugs has been recognized as a large issue that is present, yet untouched, in society today. Although I understand and agree with many of the ideas Norm Stamper approached in his article, “Let those Dopers Be,” legalizing all drugs would only fail to benefit society as a whole. Stamper neglects to address the damaging consequences that would occur if drugs were welcomed into our communities, open armed, and available for everyone. Stamper introduced that…

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    Lisa McGirr’s book, The War on Alcohol: Prohibition and the Rise of the American State, argues that alcohol was a major part of the New Deal and previous scholarship concerning alcohol has marginalized the subject or emphasized the failure of Prohibition. Contrary to this scholarship, McGirr claims the opposite, “that beer took its place in the vanguard of New Deal measures” (xiii). Referring to the title of her book, McGirr convincingly proves that the war on alcohol was waged on African…

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    Marijuana Argument Essay

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    an illegal drug in most of our states here in the United States. It is under this label of being illegal drug that most people assume marijuana is bad for you. Without doing any research on the drug people will be automatically one-hundred percent against marijuana just because its illegal in there’s or other states. But if someone was to actually do the research, they would find out Marijuana is not all that bad. If anything, the legalization of marijuana would bring forth benefits for not just…

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    government the power to declare the drug as illegal, with their enumerated powers. However, states still manage bypass and legalize cannabis. Furthermore; the federal government also attempted to make other pleasurable substances illegal, such as alcohol. As a matter of fact, prohibition was later abolished, which…

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