Amygdala

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    The cognitive level of analysis is basically the way psychology study the way the brain processes cognitive mechanisms, such as perception, thinking, problem solving, memory, language and attention. Cognition refers to the mental representation of the world of and individual, the way it receives and processes the information. Cognitive processes such as emotions have been studied in terms of cognitive and biological factors. On the other hand, physiology is know for being the biological…

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    Bipolar Disorder Summary

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    The amygdala is one of areas which processes memory, emotion, and involved in sexual behavior. Individuals with BD often have a smaller amygdala than individuals who do not have the disorder. The hippocampus is responsible for memory, motivation, and emotion. This structure is affected because it does not have as many neurons…

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    Depression is when a person feels extremely despondent and hopeless, so he or she becomes unmotivated and dislikes life in general. It affects how one thinks, behaves, and functions. According to the Anxiety and Depression Association of America, in the United States, three to five percent of adults suffer from major depression at any given moment. As many as eight out of one hundred teens and two out of one hundred children have serious depression (Depression August 2016). Depression is a…

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    Nociceptors: A Case Study

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    receive primary afferent fibers in the dorsal horn. Projections from laminae I and V continue ventrally through the spinothalamic tract (STT) to the thalamus. The spinobulbar pathway receives input from the STT and continues to the hypothalamus, amygdala, periaqueductal gray…

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    Memory is an area of cognition that is thought to both be affected by, and be an integral part of the substance abuse cycle. Whereas addiction was once believed to be attributed to a lack of willpower, or flaws of character, much of the current understanding realizes it is a complex interplay between individual genetic, biological, developmental, and environmental characteristics (Koob & Volkow, 2009). The overreaching scope of this paper is to examine the connections between addiction and…

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    skills and teamwork in multiplayer and Co-op. All of these skills are very important to have and any improvement in them is very useful. Some argue though that video games aren’t all that good for the brain because the Amygdala is suppressed when killing in a video game. The Amygdala is responsible for controlling the bodies emotional response. This is true but it is only a short term suppression. After finishing playing the games these effects are minute to untraceable. While many of the other…

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    connects the prefrontal cortex, which is responsible for critical thinking, to the amygdala, which is the center of emotion. In a normal brain, if a threat is detected, and it is not real, the prefrontal cortex sends a message to the amygdala to calm down. However, if the wiring is not connected correctly, the message to the amygdala might not go through. When this occurs, the people will react with greater amygdala activity and more emotion. Some of the reason this happens is due to the genes…

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    white matter changes in detail in the human brain in adolescence (Paus 3). The amygdala has been an area of recent study that neurologists say is an important factor for anxiety disorders since the amygdala is the emotion receptor (Casey 20). A study performed by Dr. Casey, in which 60 children, adolescents, and adults were examined during a series of tests, showed that adolescents have an initial exaggerated amygdala response to cues that signal possible threat relative to children and adults.…

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    Dangers Of Phobias

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    Are you scared of heights or tight, enclosed spaces? Of the wriggly legs of a spider? You might be frightened of these things, but people with phobias are actually impaired physically or psychologically by them. They experience extreme panic attacks, heart palpitations, dizziness, nausea, or even fainting! These are not the symptoms of a normal fright, but rather of a phobic, a person who has a phobia. Phobics avoid the object of their fear at all costs, to the point where it is unreasonably…

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    What comes to your mind when you hear that someone has PTSD? Are you afraid? Do you fear your life when you are around that person who haves PTSD? PTSD stands for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, which develops after a traumatic event. It was originally recorded during World War I when soldiers developed battle fatigue. Many people do not know the seriousness of PTSD and how it affects people and their daily lives. According to the NHS choices PTSD is estimated to affect 1 in every 3 people who…

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