Amygdala

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    Fear Research Papers

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    situation.The amygdala, an almond-shaped like tissue, has a function which stores fear emotions and can interpret them( D'Arcy Lyness).Another part is the hypothalamus, it is responsible for the “flight to fight” situation. Other parts, like the sensory cortex, is also involved in receiving or sending off data to and from the brain.Upon my research, there were many important information being taken to consider the fact that if phobias do affect a person. Though, I learned that the amygdala is…

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    and past experiences, the emotional mind emerges reactive and centers on bodily emotions. When effectively balanced, the rational and emotional minds create a sense of harmony, through making decisions that satisfy both the head and the heart. The amygdala, a key component of the emotional mind, “ is an almond shaped cluster of interconnected structures perched about the brainstem near the bottom of the limbic ring” (p14) While retaining a small structural percentage, this structure preserves a…

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    For patients with temporal lobe epilepsy there is a high resistant to medication. This leads to a risk of memory impairments and mood disturbances. Long-term this leads to quality of life impairments and an increased risk of death. Due to the resistant to medication surgery is recommended for patients with TLE. Anteromesial temporal lobectomy (AMTL) is the most common surgery for the treatment of patients with TLE. AMTL is performed in both children and adults. AMTL is done in 30-40% of surgery…

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    differences in areas of the brains of those with PTSD compared with those without PTSD. The areas of the brain that are known to be affected and responsible for bringing on the usual symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder are the hippocampus, amygdala, and the ventromedial prefrontal cortex. (Wlassoff 2015) The damage causes these areas, collectively, to change the mechanisms of stress responses that impair perception and responses in patients with PTSD compared to someone who has not been…

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    are thought to be caused by high levels of testosterone can be treated with drugs that block androgen receptors and therefore stop androgens from causing their usual effects. It is believed that testosterone influences and increases activity in the amygdala, this may enhance a person’s irritability and cause them to be more aggressive, therefore by controlling testosterone levels you can also control the amygdala’s response to threat. Low levels of serotonin can be treated with selective…

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    intimate partner violence (IPV) only manifests in a subpopulation of alcoholics. However, the emphasis of the psychological reasoning that predisposes a subpopulation of alcoholics to initiate this violence is unclear. The article, “Smaller right amygdala male patients with a history of intimate partner violence: a volumetric imaging study”, illustrates that based on the MRI studies, there is a high correlation between abnormalities of the orbital frontal cortex (oFC) volume and the severity of…

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    model is called the Papez circuit.[2] In the year of 1948 scientist Yakovlev proposed Yakovlev's circuit in the command of emotions involving the anterior, insular, , temporal , orbitofrontal and lobe cortex, the dorsomedial nucleus of thalamus and amygdala.[3] In 1952, Paul D. MacLean used the name “limbic system” to describe Broca's limbic lobe and related subcortical nuclei as the combined neural substrate for emotion.[1] He was also pivotal in the proposal and definition of the Triune…

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    authors discuss the role of the amygdala, prefrontal cortex (PFC) and insula in anxiety disorders. One of the more reliable findings across studies of the anxiety disorders is amygdala hyperresponsivity. To illustrate, a study done by Hariri and colleagues discovered that amygdala reactivity to environmental threat is controlled by a regulatory variant (5-HTTLPR) in the human serotonin transporter gene. Specifically, their work shows that hyper-reactivity in the amygdala is short allele driven.…

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    Researchers hypothesize that dysfunction in the frontal lobe region, specifically the orbitofrontal cortex and amygdala, may be the answer behind psychopathy. Our frontal lobe plays a key role in a multitude of functions that allow humans to distinguish themselves from primitive, animalistic beings. Executive functioning is…

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    Kluver Bucy Syndrome

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    The amygdala is often called the “aggression center” of the brain. There are two of them in one’s limbic system, and they are located on either side of the thalamus, at the end of the hippocampus, a little bit in front of the brain stem. When the amygdalas are stimulated, one feels anger, violence, fear, and anxiety. When the amygdalas are completely destroyed, a person has what is called Kluver-Bucy syndrome. The effects of this syndrome include hyperorality, hypersexuality, and…

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