Alfred Kinsey

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    A Few Good Men Analysis

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    A Few Good Men The film A Few Good Men by Rob Reiner is the best example of the judicial drama, a very popular genre in American cinema. It is a dynamic, uninterrupted even for a second, detective intrigue with a great actor's play: one of the best performances of Tom Cruise, Demi Moore, Kevin Bacon and Jack Nicholson. The movie, edited in 1992, contains some ethical and moral issues related to the judicial system and immoral army orders, which turn into a crime against humanity. On the one…

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    Sergei Prokofief Essay

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    Sergei Prokofief (1891 – 1953) An important factor in the film business, being that’s it such a complicated collaborative art form, is working with people that you’ve had good working relationships with on past projects. This is a norm in so many projects. We find directors working with the same actors, cinematographers, editors, produces, and composers, over and over again. A good example of directors and composers: Spielberg/Williams, Fellini/Rota, and Eisenstein/Prokofief. Sergei Prokofiev…

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    Introduction One of the salient features of the film, The Avengers, is the clever dialogue exchanges between the characters. As far as movie scripts are concerned, The Avengers is, perhaps, one of those that have the wittiest lines. Despite the fact that the plots are quite predictable, the movie with its clean graphics and witty dialogue exchanges is purely entertaining. Created by Marvel Studios in 2012, The Avengers materialized Marvel’s plan to join some of their marketable comic book…

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    From the films we watched this semester Vertigo and Bicycle Thieves Vertigo somehow seems to transcend these concerns and instead offers a compelling psycho-drama that has complex layers of meaning and employs carefully crafted film language to present a narrative that aligns the audience so completely with the protagonist.Perhaps the simplest application of this idea is to suggest that Scottie represents us, the audience, the spectator and the constructed version of Madeleine represents the…

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    The Mood For Love Analysis

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    Wong Kar Wai is probably the most innovative and avant-garde director to come out of Hong Kong. As part of the second New Wave of Hong Kong cinema, Wai moved far away from the traditional, Jackie Chan and Shaw Brothers style of films, which focused on action, and explored more substantial themes, icnluding human psyche, politics and the social conditions in Hong Kong. His aesthetics are quite similar with Jean-Luc Godard and the French Wave, in general, particularly because he also took apart…

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    Throughout the film industry, Alfred Hitchcock’s film Psycho has revolutionized the horror genre with his ways of merging the obvious with the mysterious. Alfred Hitchcock, ‘Master of Suspense,’ is known for his filming techniques which made his film stand out compared to other horror films during his period. Hitchcock used these techniques throughout the film Psycho to allow the viewers to get an insight of what is happening in the film. One of the most important scenes, where Hitchcock used…

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    English Assignment 1 Romeo and Juliet Olwethu Masiza 16013255 Question 2 : Filmic devices This essay will discuss the different filmic devices in Romeo and Juliet, namely extreme close-up; low angle shot; tilt; zoom and flashback, and why Baz Luhrmann has chosen to use each one of these filmic devices. Luhrmann has chosen to use all these different camera shots so that he creates a meaningful scene full of mixed emotions. Extreme close up is when the camera zooms in very closely…

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    Orson Welles’ first film, “Citizen Kane,” richly realizes the full potential of excellent craftsmanship. Every perceivable element of cinema is expertly utilized to drive the story, themes and tones that “Citizen Kane” present. This is especially apparent in the scene that follows Susan leaving Kane. This scene’s manipulation of mise-en-scène, editing and sound bring together all of Welles’ ideas and drive them beyond the finish line. Mise en scène is what appears in the frame, what the viewer…

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    Week 11 French New Wave Breathless 90 mins, 1960, French Directed By: Jean-Luc Godard Written By: Jean-Luc Godard Synopsis: Paying homage to the numerous crime thrillers of Hollywood’s Golden era, this film charts the relationship between Michel, a stylish but unpredictable criminal, and his estranged American girlfriend. Again, the notion of escapism through the cinema is key to this most famous of the new wave pictures. Essential Readings: Hart Cohen, Juan Francisco Salazar and Iqbal Barkat.…

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    Tim Burton, a person who started out as a kid fascinated by other famous directors and then became one himself. What did he do to become such a famous director? He is known for his disturbing and yet child-like movies, such as Charlie and the Chocolate Factory and Edward Scissorhands. Everyone of all ages can be able to enjoy his movie. Tim Burton’s style is kid-friendly at first, but then it takes a disturbing and twisted turn. One of Burton's cinematic technique he uses is…

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