Afrika Bambaataa

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    Hip-Hop Music Origin

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    the part they like to dance on. Then he began to MC which is something like rapping. People believed this was the birth of Hip-hop music. This kind of music led to an entire cultural movement that’s altered generational thinking- from politics to race, art, and languages. (http://www.pbs.org/opb/historydetectives/investigation/birthplace-of-hip-hop/) The “True Meaning” of Hip-hop music by Afrika Bambaataa.…

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    For the term paper I decided to take this opportunity to speak about my favorite music genre, Hip Hop. Ever since I was a little boy I always heard Hip Hop playing on the radio and I automatically fell in love with the music genre and culture of Hip Hop. The song I am going to go in depth about and analyze is Afrika Bambaataa’s & the Soulsonic Force’s hit song "Planet Rock". The main reason why I chose this piece of music is because the impact it had in the Hip Hop community was like non other…

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    have a significant effect on how individuals dress and even act. It is in the issue of VIBE magazine from December 1994 to January 1995 that we see this work in an interesting way for those immersed in the culture of Hip-Hop: African-Americans. The images here appeal to both African-American men and women in a way that idealized the adult life of celebrities and even pushed for the unity of all African-Americans, just as Afrika Bambaataa spoke of with his famous Zulu Nation. The first thing…

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    apathy that came to represent how poorly The Bronx was viewed by the public. Out of this strife, African-Americans in The Bronx found solace in block parties, from which came the foundations of Hip Hop as created by a Bronx native, Afrika Bambaataa. Afrika Bambaataa first became prominent in 1977, when he started to host these block parties. Block parties first started in 1971, when local Bronx DJs would get together to form free music parties for neighbors, and many sought to bring an end to…

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    Hip Hop Dance Research

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    a.r. "93.04.04: The Evolution of Rap Music in the United States." 93.04.04: The Evolution of Rap Music in the United States. Yale New-haven Teacher Institute, 4 Mar. 93. Web. 09 Feb.2016). "The technique called 'scratching' was invented by a DJ called Theodor. 'Scratching' involves the DJ spinning a record backwards and forward very fast while the needle is in the groove. A record when it is handled in this way can become a percussive instrument. With the advent of the CD, this technique may…

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    had several dancers in the film "Flashdance" that was nominated inthe 1983 Oscars. These dancers used their talent to express everything they could not in words on the dance floor. Breakdancing became a way to communicate with others. The next talent that comes from Hip Hop is DJ 'ing. DJ 'ing is the art form that consists of making music into other music. It combines the sounds and squences of other songs, using turn tables and records. Many early DJ 's used records from home collections to…

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    Social Issues In Hip Hop

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    ongoing inhuman experiences and oppression in urban society. Author of “Black Noise” Tricia Ross states, “Hip Hop is a cultural form that attempts to negotiate the experiences of marginalization, brutally truncated opportunity, and oppression within the cultural imperatives of African-American and Caribbean history, identity and community.” Postindistrialized global forces, that impacted urban job opportunity alongside racial discrimination have aided in the deconstruction of those who existed…

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    rap music, to the rolling credits that depicted moves of breakdancing, Rize incorporated these vital elements throughout. Another theme, seen in other hip-hop movies as well as this one, is the aspect of riots in inner cities. These riots, born out of violence against the authority of police officers, has happened in other movies such as La Haine that have been implemented in our class’ syllabus. Within Rize, the narrator described the reoccurring riots, beginning in the 1960s, which lasted…

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    Hip Hop Culture In America

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    control of the tone at his parties. A complete shift from the violence and hatred propagated by gang culture, Herc vowed that “If there’s any violence or trouble, I’m pulling the plug” (Chang 78). Another DJ, Afrika Bambaataa, forged alliances and broke hatred of the past with his beats and message, which later became the Zulu Nation. An important element of the Zulu message, the Zulu King dancers, also contributed to the evolution of b-boying. B-boying was an opportunity to display unique style…

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    Five Elements Of Hip Hop

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    Bronx was literally burning down, with thousands of buildings being burnt each year in the Bronx. This caused the area to become poverty stricken, gang ridden, and overall to just have a horrible economy. When the mayor of New York was asked about the problem of the Bronx burning, he had replied simply with (not exact wording) “well if they really wanted homes, they wouldn’t be burning all them down.” This is important because it feeds into that racist mentality, as when he refers to they, he…

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