Mfecane Essay

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    have been in the southern part of Africa since the 1400s. The contemporary nation of Lesotho, also called the Kingdom of Lesotho, came about in the 19th century under the initiative of King Moshoeshoe I. Moshoeshoe I is considered by any to be the father of the Lesotho history. In the 1820s, Moshoeshoe I led his people to a mountain stronghold, Butha Buthe, where they sustained the first battles of the Mfecane (also called by the Sesotho name, Difaqane, which means scattering, forced dispersal or migration). The Mfecane represents a period of time between 1815 and 1840 dominated by widespread chaos in southern Africa, due to, in large part, the machinations of Shaka, a Zulu chieftain who formed an expansive and militaristic Zulu Kingdom. Around 1824, King Moshoeshoe I moved his people to another mountain stronghold, Thaba-Bosiu, which was easier to defend. He rose in power and diplomatic status largely because of his compassion toward his defeated enemies, the land and protection he provided to differing Sotho peoples which helped strengthen the Basotho nation. The continuing Mfecane contributed to the growth in the number of followers and influence of Moshoeshoe I by creating and sustaining an inflow of refugees and victims. The traditional religious practices of the Sotho people involve the worship of a Supreme Being through the honoring of ancestors. Most commonly called Modimo, the Supreme Being in which most Sotho people believe is approached and worshiped through…

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    • By sharing the intravenous needles, because HIV can be transmitted by reusing contaminated needles and syringes. • Having anal intercourse with an infected person without using a condom. • Having sex with prostitutes without a condom as prostitute are at high risk because they have multiple sex partners and more likely to be intravenous drug users. • By having more than one sex partner without using a condom. The Effect of HIV/AIDS on a person living with it and the closest people to him…

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    Congo Empire

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    used weapons such as the axe, spear and bow and arrow. Located in the Congo around the Wamba River were also the Yaka warriors, who had a reputation of ferocity. Note: The AFRICAN BUSHIDO of the Eliminya Society, Kukuruku Tribe of Central Africa performs in their initiation attire resembling Japanese Bushido  The Zulu’s; meaning the people of heaven, formally begins around the mid-1600’s, with the Nguni tribes (Central Africa) that migrated south. Accordingly, the settlers…

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    also developed and implemented many basic tactics that the Zulus would use in battle. The different regiments in the army were known as the ‘impi’ and would travel at least 80 kilometres a day. Boys would accompany the warriors on their journey, carrying the cooking pots and sleeping mats. Some of Shaka’s first acts with his new army were against those who had made his childhood a miserable time. He also attacked the eLangeni tribe because they had pushed him and his mother out. Within a year of…

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    “Tactics favor the regular army while strategy favors the enemy … therefore the object is to fight, not to maneuver.” – Colonel C.E. Callwell, in Small Wars; Their Principles and Practice. Asymmetric warfare is typically a war between a standing, professional army and an insurgency or resistance movement. It is warfare between opposing forces that differ greatly in military power resulting in the use of unconventional weapons and tactics (tactics usually associated with guerilla warfare.) The…

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    improvement of Nigeria's broad communications. After the Nigerian Civil War, in which Achebe and numerous other Igbo journalists took a dynamic part, the writer's works got to be all the more straightforwardly utilitarian and political. In the wake of educating in the United States and understanding that the most broadly taught book concerning Africa was Conrad's Heart of Darkness, Achebe got to be more thoughtful to African writers who revoked the utilization of provincial dialects, and he got…

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