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25 Cards in this Set

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Name the different type of nouns
Common
Proper
Collective
Abstract
Concrete
Pronouns
What is a common noun?
Refers to general categories of entities

E.g.
Fish, state, university
What is a proper noun?
Refers to specific names of entities.

E.g.
Lisa, Melbourne, English
What is a collective noun?
Refers to a group of something, often animals.

E.g.
A *herd* of cattle, a *gaggle* of geese
What is an abstract noun?
Nouns that have theoretical concepts, ideas or philosophies that cannot be concrete.

E.g.
Emotion such as love or hate, ideologies such as liberty or freedom.
What is a concrete noun?
Nouns that can be seen, felt, touched, tasted or heard.

E.g.
Bird, door, sky.
What is a pronoun?
Used in place of a proper noun when referring to people, places or things.

E.g.
I, you, he, she, they, it.

They can also take on possessive forms such as hers, his, mine, theirs.
Name the different types of pronouns
Personal
Possessive
Reflective
Relative
What is a personal pronoun?
Me, you, him, her, if, you, us and them.

Used to stand for nouns which are the object of a verb - that is, they are 'receiving' the action. Also used after a preposition.

E.g.
To, between, from, under
What is a possessive pronoun?
Mine, yours, his, hers, ours, yours, theirs.

Used to stand for a noun which owns something.
What is a reflective pronoun?
Refers back to the noun.

E.g.
Myself, yourself, himself, herself, itself, ourself, yourselves and themselves.
What are the different types of adjectives?
Base
Comparative
Superlative
What is a base adjective?
The base word.

E.g.
Tall, fat, blue
What is a comparative adjective?
Usually proceeded by the suffix - er.

E.g.
Taller, fatter, bluer
What is a superlative adjective?
Usually proceeded by the suffix - est.

E.g.
Tallest, fattest, bluest
Name the different types of verbs
Simple
Compound
What is simple verb?
Acting, saying, thinking, feeling and relating words. Simple words consist of one word.

E.g.
I hit the ball.
What is a compound verb?
Have two or more words to show an action.

E.g.
Steven had smashed the ball.
What are the verb tenses?
Present tense
Past tense
Future tense
What is present tense?
If something is happening now.

E.g.
I am the shortest person in, my family. Aaron is sitting near the door.
What is past tense?
Something has already occurred. This verb tense is made by changing the form of the verb, adding an ending or using a helping verb.

E.g.
I ate breakfast quickly (changing form of verb).
We watched the race on the television (adding an ending).
Steph was sitting near the door (helping verb added - 'was').
They had taken the wrong turn (helping verb added - 'had').
What is future tense?
Something happened in the future. Formed by adding helping verbs such as will or shall.

E.g.
I will be competing in the athletics carnival.
The library will close soon.
What is an adverb?
Adverbs give more information about a verb. They add meaning by telling us how, when and where, as well as comparing and telling us how much.

Often we can become confused by identifying adjectives and adverbs. Adverbs give us more information about a verb whereas adjectives describes nouns.

E.g.
The crowd cheered enthusiastically (how).
I always attend my dance lessons (when).
We looked everywhere for the keys (where).
It was a very close match (how much) ('close' is the adjective describing the game).
What is a preposition?
Connects nouns with other words. A preposition plus a noun or pronoun makes a 'prepositional phrase' .

E.g.
'The cow jumped *over* the moon'.
What is a conjunction?
Are joining words, which link words or groups of words.

E.g.
Fish *and* chips.
Wait here *while* I shop.
Pick your nose *but* don't eat it.

They can be at the start of a sentence.
E.g.
Although

Some are paired together.
E.g.
Either/or