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6 Cards in this Set

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We are considered uptight, shy, nerdy, weird, secondary, and one to two out three people, are it. We are introverts. Good afternoon, my name is Teo Gugushe and today I will be talking about introverts, in an extroverted world


Before we get started, what is the difference between introverts and extroverts? Although introverts enjoy social activities, they need time to recharge in a quiet place. Extroverts like all of us need down time, but recharge through social interaction. Common traits identified with introversion are self-awareness, thoughtfulness, private, good listeners, quiet and reserved with large groups or unfamiliar people, more sociable around people they know well, and learning well through observation.

Although most people often write off introversion and shyness as the same, it's important to know that they are not. Although it is not uncommon for the two characteristics to exist in the same person, shyness is about fear of social judgment, while introversion is about how you react to stimulus.

Common traits associated with extroversion are acting before thinking, being outgoing and enthusiastic, easy to approach, enjoys to be the centre of attention, expressive, and assertive. As you can see, introverts and extroverts are on the opposite sides of the spectrum, yet there is no such thing as a pure intro or extrovert. We all posses a bit of both and some of land somewhere in the middle. This is what we call an ambivert.

I predominantly consider myself an introvert, and although I know that introverts are great in their own way, I often feel guilty when I don't make choices that would reflect those of an extrovert. During class I feel like I should be socializing with friends, even though sometimes I just feel like finishing my work.

Although some of us may feel this way, many cultures don't feel the same social burden that you and I may. In other more academic oriented cultures, being quiet and focused is ordinary. People don't feel the same pressure to be charismatic and outgoing. Many cultures choose school over sport, or study over friends and are still respected by their piers.

How did extroversion come to be the ideal personality in North America? Let us go back to the twentieth century. Corporate America was booming, and great progress was being made in agricultural advancements. With the new technology, less farmers were now needed to supply the same or even more yield, but farmers who could not afford the upgrades were greatly out done by others, and small community shops could not keep up with large factories, and were forced to move into urban centres to find work. This replaced what was a culture of character into a culture of personality.

The word personality did not even exist in the English vocabulary until the eighteenth century, and the idea of possessing a good personality wasn't common until the twentieth century. People now we're forced to think about job interviews and what companies are looking for in an employee. The honourable tradesmen and farmer were now dead, and in its place was the magnetic salesman.

People tend to relate to the expressive man of action, over the thoughtful man of contemplation. This situation is very common even though there is zero correlation between being charismatic and having the best ideas. At this point I think I have to say that I do not hate extroverts, but I do think that they are an undervalued group, and here

#1 Introverts are ignored for leadership type rolls despite introverts tending to be very careful and less likely to take outsized risks


#2 Introverted leaders often deliver better outcomes than extroverts because they're less likely to force their ideals onto their employees and are more likely to encourage them to roam with their own ideas


#3 Introverts and extroverts bring unique ideas to the table, there needs to be a better mix of the two in leadership circles to promote a balanced outcome.

In conclusion, I'm not suggesting that introverts are superior to extroverts, but rather that both personality types compliment each other to create a well balanced flow. This effects not only business but how teachers teach, employers employ, how family treat other family members and friends make friends. The more educated and mindful we are of these basic personality differences, the more it will allow us to have better relationships and outcomes in every facet of our lives.

END