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8 Cards in this Set

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To make sure we’re all on the same line, we’re gonna start with a small exercise. What’s taste actually? (Taste is on the middle of the white board, classmates tell what they think of and we will write it on the board)

The sugar in your food activates sweet taste-receptors in your mouth, located on taste buds on your tongue. Taste buds can detect all flavours no matter what their position is. These receptors send signals to the gustatory cortex in your brain. Different parts of the gustatory cortex process different flavours. The same goes for food that is salty, bitter, sour or umami (meat)

However, sour and bitter is experienced as unpleasant in large quantities, because it can be the taste of over-ripe fruit and rotten meat. Umami is meat flavour and is present when the amino acid L-glutamate is present. It can be found in meat and mushrooms. The body is supposed to like it, since the amino acid stimulates the body to take in other necessary amino acids. Salty foods are also tasty since it is necessary for the body to regulate blood pressure and volume.

What we found is that sugar keeps coming back in all events where taste plays a role. Birthdays, Christmas pudding. But why is this the case?This has to do with evolution. In nature, food that contains a lot of sugar are rare. (Glucose, fructose, sucrose) Those are all carbohydrates and contain a lot of energy. Therefore, whenever you would find a food that contained a lot of sugar, you would each as much as you could, because you had no idea when you’re next meal would be.

Nowadays, we know we will have enough food. Why do we still like sugar that much?Dopamine is an important chemical and neurotransmitter. Dopamine receptors in the brain are stimulated to release dopamine due to heroin, alcohol, nicotine and.. sugar. The reward system is a network in your brain involved in feeling pleasure. When there is enough dopamine released in this system, euphoria is the result.

Since we of course want all your dopamine levels to rise, we brought you cupcakes!

We are going to test your taste buds. We have 4 different flavoured cupcakes. Each group will get 1 cupcake of each colour, and it is up to you to share it, talk about it together and guess which flavour is in it. If you think, well I’m not sure, but It could be… just write that down, we only added a few drops of each flavour so they might not be clear at first.When you wrote the flavour down, hold your paper in the air. The team who wins will win a really tasty price.

Well then we executed a tricky experiment in which welet you taste 4 differently coloured cupcakes and asked you how they tasted.This showed that the colour of the cupcakes influenced the way you tasted them,which is also the case with context. This could be seen back in the story of the Vinegar tasters, where the threefounders of Asia’s major religons,Confucius, Buddha, and Lao-tse had a sip of vinegar and all three tastedsomething different due to their different look on life, which can be seen backin the religions themselves.