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38 Cards in this Set

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'Life, as it appears to Webster, is a moral chaos'

Travis Bogard


(The White Devil)

Ruined cathedral, burnished wrecking-ball, stage littered with shattered religious tablets

1991 National Theatre Production of The White Devil

Webster is 'not afraid to portray women of power' who 'choose to take risks, and in doing so broaden the female horizons of the Jacobean era, while at the same time undermining norms of established behaviour'

Margaret Loftus Ranald


(The White Devil)

Flamineo played by a female actress

2014 RSC Production of The White Devil



Vittoria wearing white during the trial scene

2014 RSC Production of The White Devil

Isabella has all of the 'characteristics of an obedient female'

Somer Marie Stahl


(The White Devil)

'Eagles eat not men till they are dead, but women devour them alive'

Joseph Swetnam


(The White Devil)


AO4

Monticelso is 'the most significant and cunning politician in the play. He devotes his life to power and authority... Religion is, for him, another form of control and abuse'

Jose Manuel Gonzalez Fernandez


(The White Devil)

In 'Lydicas', Milton likens Catholics to hungry wolves leaping into a sheep's pen - an image similar to Satan leaping over the wall into Paradise in Book IV

(Paradise Lost)


AO4

'Milton was a true poet and of the devil's party without knowing it'

William Blake


(Paradise Lost)

Vittoria as 'demonstrating a failure of male authority'

Dr June Waudby


(The White Devil)

Paradise Lost is a 'deeply misogynistic text that clearly echoes the patriarchal society of the seventeenth century'

Kaitlyn MacPhee


(Paradise Lost)

'Milton shifts his interpretation of Genesis away from conventional misogyny to give Eve more sympathy and more equality'

Caroline Moore


(Paradise Lost)

'Vittoria is arraigned by powerful male interrogators and her right of response is negated by her gender'

Dr June Waudby


(The White Devil)

'The interpretation of Vittoria's enigmatic dream is construed in keeping with each character's own personal philosophy'

Dr June Waudby (The White Devil)

'By giving Satan such interiority, Milton further complicates and revises theheroic materials he inherits’

David Lowenstein


(Paradise Lost)

The White Devil ‘criticisesthe Jacobean era, yet cannot be considered to be separate from it’

Liam McNamara


(The White Devil)

Characters only have soliloquies when they are 'fallen or about to fall'

Penguin edition Introduction to Paradise Lost

‘Vittoria’scharacter has been constructed by the assumptions and interpretations of thecharacters who surround her’

Dr June Waudby


(The White Devil)



Milton is 'blind yet bold'

Andrew Marvell


(Paradise Lost)

'The 'inward' soliloquy is self-evidently a highly effective way of showing the human heart of any act of choice'

Caroline Moore


(Paradise Lost)

The serpent is a 'vessel of wrath fitted for destruction'

Romans 9.22


(The Bible)


AO4



Satan has 5 soliloquies which 'associate him with the flawed protagonists of the Elizabethan stage'

Barbara Lewalksi


(Paradise Lost)

'He is a leering, plotting voyeur, closer to Iago than Macbeth'

Caroline Moore (Paradise Lost)

When he chooses to 'imbrute' himself, 'he has moved outside and below both the classical and the Elizabethan paradigms for tragedy'

Barbara Lewalksi


(Paradise Lost)

Milton 'never takes the easy misogynist shortcuts of the period, never representing her [Eve], for example as the 'weaker vessel''

Caroline Moore (Paradise Lost)

'If he had delayed, or allowed himself to think things through, he would not have fallen at all.'

Caroline Moore (Paradise Lost)

Where there are gaps to be filled, Milton shifts his interpretation of Genesis away from conventional misogyny to give Eve more sympathy and more equality

Phillip Gallagher


(Paradise Lost)

'Milton is no more a feminist than he is a misogynist'

Caroline Moore (Paradise Lost)

'In Webster there is no deeper purpose than to make our flesh creep.'

Ian Jack


(The White Devil)

'The play is a dramatic symbol of moral confusion, the impossibility of distinguishing appearance and reality in a in which evil wears always the mask of virtue, and virtue, the mask of evil.'

Irving Ribner


(The White Devil)

'the revenges are more repulsive than the wrongdoers they punish.'

J.W. Lever


(The White Devil)

'In violently protecting his sister's social standing, Flamineo simultaneously protects his own.

Strycharsen


(The White Devil)

'Patriarchal poetry'

Gertrude Stein


(Paradise Lost)

'Woman was created for man, and not man for woman'

Milton


(Paradise Lost)

'Her sin is not in wanting to be free, but in presuming that she is, in not knowing her place in the natural hierarchy'

Oriel and Goldberg,


Oxford Introduction


(Paradise Lost)

Milton's 'Turkish concept of females, as subordinate and inferior beings'

Samuel Johnson


(Paradise Lost)

'Adam is more guilty than Eve'

Fredson Bowers


(Paradise Lost)