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Identify and describe the three comprehension skill levels

Identify and describe the three comprehension skill levels




Domain 5 Comprehension: Competency 12-Factors affecting reading comprehension

Literal comprehension: The ability of the reader to understand the surface meaning of a text.


Inferential: The ability of a reader to interpret what she or he has read.


Evaluative: The ability of the reader to make judgements about what he or she has read.




Reference Zarillo, Chapter 12 Comprehension: Concepts and Factors Affecting Reading Comprehension, Sections 2, 3, and 4.



 List four literal comprehension skills.

 Domain 5 Comprehension: Competency 12-Factors affecting reading comprehension  

List four literal comprehension skills.




Domain 5 Comprehension: Competency 12-Factors affecting reading comprehension

1. Identifying explicitly stated main ideas


2. Identifying details and sequences of events


3. Identifying clearly stated cause-and-effect relationships


4. Identifying the components of story grammar: plot events, character, the setting, the story’s conflict, and how the story is resolved




Reference Zarillo, Chapter 12 Comprehension: Concepts and Factors Affecting Reading Comprehension, Section 2.

List seven inferential comprehension skills



Domain 5 Comprehension: Competency 12-Factors affecting reading comprehension    

List seven inferential comprehension skills




Domain 5 Comprehension: Competency 12-Factors affecting reading comprehension

1. Inferring main ideas


2. Making comparisons


3. Identifying cause-and-effect relationships not explicitly stated in the text


4. Drawing conclusions


5. Making generalizations


6. Making predictions using evidence from the text


7. Inferring themes, if the theme is not clearly stated




Reference Zarillo, Chapter 12 Comprehension: Concepts and Factors Affecting Reading Comprehension, Section 3.



List five evaluative comprehension skills



Domain 5 Comprehension: Competency 12-Factors affecting reading comprehension   

List five evaluative comprehension skills




Domain 5 Comprehension: Competency 12-Factors affecting reading comprehension

1. Recognizing instances of bias


2. Recognizing unsupported assumptions, propaganda, and faulty reasoning in texts


3. Distinguishing facts and opinions in texts


4. Judging a text’s content, characters, and use of language


5. Analyzing themes




Reference Zarillo, Chapter 12 Comprehension: Concepts and Factors Affecting Reading Comprehension, Section 4.B

List and describe two discussion strategies for Text-Based Discussions



Domain 5 Comprehension: Competency 12-Factors affecting reading comprehension    

List and describe two discussion strategies for Text-Based Discussions




Domain 5 Comprehension: Competency 12-Factors affecting reading comprehension

1. Instructional Conversations-Developed for English learners, the instructional conversation format takes place during and after students read a selection. The teacher leads the discussion with the goal of promoting more complex language. Ex. “Tell me more about_____” or “What do you mean by _____”.


2. Questioning the Author-Where student answer prompts to analyze the author’s intent, craft, and clarity. Ex. What is the author trying to tell you? or Why is the author telling you that?




Reference Zarillo, Chapter 12 Comprehension: Concepts and Factors Affecting Reading Comprehension, Section 6.C

Identify and describe two direct instruction methods to activate background knowledge before children read.



Domain 5 Comprehension:  Competency 13-

Instruction and Assessment-Before Children Read, While Children Read, After Children Read

Identify and describe two direct instruction methods to activate background knowledge before children read.




Domain 5 Comprehension: Competency 13-Instruction and Assessment-Before Children Read, While Children Read, After Children Read

1. A KWL Chart:


A. K-What students Know


B. W-What students Want to Know


C. L-What students Have Learned


2. Prereading Plan (PreP)


A. Associations - “Tell me what you think of when you hear…”


B. Reflections on the associations-”What made you think of X when I asked what you think of?”


C. Organizing associations-After association and reflection, the teacher asks, “Do any of you have new or different ideas/thoughts about penguins?”




Reference Zarillo, Chapter 13 Comprehension: Instruction and Assessment-Before Children Read, While Children Read, After Children Read, Section 1.B

What is a QAR and what are the four types?



Domain 5 Comprehension:  Competency 13- Instruction and Assessment-Before Children Read, While Children Read, After Children Read  

What is a QAR and what are the four types?




Domain 5 Comprehension: Competency 13- Instruction and Assessment-Before Children Read, While Children Read, After Children Read

QAR: The Question-Answer Relationship system that outlines question classification and answer verification




1. Right There: Where the answer to the question is in a single identifiable sentence (Literal questions)


2. Think and search: Where the answer is in the text but is in two different part, not a single sentence (Literal questions)


3. Author and you: Where the answer is not in the text but students need to think about what they know and find the relationship with what the author said (Inferential or evaluative questions).


4. On my own: Where the answer is not in the story but can be answered without reading the story (Inferential or evaluative questions).




Reference Zarillo, Chapter 13 Comprehension: Instruction and Assessment-Before Children Read, While Children Read, After Children Read, Section 1.E.2

There are seven metacognitive strategies teachers need to teach to help students become proficient while reading.  Name and define them.



Domain 5 Comprehension:  Competency 13- Instruction and Assessment-Before Children Read, While Children...

There are seven metacognitive strategies teachers need to teach to help students become proficient while reading. Name and define them.




Domain 5 Comprehension: Competency 13- Instruction and Assessment-Before Children Read, While Children Read, After Children Read

Visualizing - “Seeing” the action of the story in your head


Paraphrasing-Stating in your own words something that happened in the story.


Clarifying-Stopping when you are confused and doing something to bring clarity to the reading


Predicting-Making an educated guess as to what will happen next


Generating questions-Stating questions that will be answered in subsequent sections of the text


Summarizing-Reducing what has been read, either orally or in writing, to a few sentences containing the main events of the story and its theme


Adjusting reading rate-Changing the pace of reading according to the difficulty of the text




Reference Zarillo, Chapter 13 Comprehension: Instruction and Assessment-Before Children Read, While Children Read, After Children Read, Section 3

List three important components in assessing comprehension



Domain 5 Comprehension:  Competency 13- Instruction and Assessment-Before Children Read, While Children Read, After Children Read    

List three important components in assessing comprehension




Domain 5 Comprehension: Competency 13- Instruction and Assessment-Before Children Read, While Children Read, After Children Read

1. Determining each child’s independent, instructional, and frustration reading levels


2. Gather data on each child’s mastery of comprehension skills at each level (literal, inferential, and evaluative)


3. Gather data on each child’s master of reading comprehension strategies




Reference Zarillo, Chapter 13 Comprehension: Instruction and Assessment-Before Children Read, While Children Read, After Children Read, Section 6

Are the following Literal, Inferential, or Evaluative questions:  Right There Questions,Think and Search Questions,Author and You Question 

Competency 13- Instruction and Assessment-Before Children Read, While Children Read, After Children Rea...

Are the following Literal, Inferential, or Evaluative questions: Right There Questions,Think and Search Questions,Author and You Question




Competency 13- Instruction and Assessment-Before Children Read, While Children Read, After Children Read, and On My Own Questions

1. Right There <-> Literal Comprehension


2. Think and Search<->Literal Comprehension


3. Author and You<->Inferential and Evaluative


4. On My Own<->Inferential or Evaluative Reference




Zarillo, Chapter 13 Comprehension: Instruction and Assessment-Before Children Read, While Children Read, After Children Read, Section 6.A.B

Name a visual strategy that can help struggling readers and students with learning disabilities.



Domain 5 Comprehension: Competency 14-Narrative/Literary Texts  

Name a visual strategy that can help struggling readers and students with learning disabilities.




Domain 5 Comprehension: Competency 14-Narrative/Literary Texts

Story Maps-Struggling readers need graphic representations of things, including the plots of the stories they are reading or listening to. Story maps highlight the important events of a story and help struggling readers understand the relationship of events in a story.




Reference Zarillo, Chapter 14: Comprehension: Instruction and Assessment-Understanding and Analyzing Narrative/Literary Texts, Section 6.A.3

Identify and define literary elements of a story.

 Domain 5 Comprehension: Competency 14-Narrative/Literary Texts 

Identify and define literary elements of a story.




Domain 5 Comprehension: Competency 14-Narrative/Literary Texts

1. Character: Usually people but sometimes animals, plants or inanimate things (Ex. a stuffed animal)


2. Plot: The sequence of events in a story


3. Setting: Both the time and the place of a story


4. Mood: The feeling you have when you are reading the story


5. Theme: The important message of a story. Usually a comment about the human condition




Reference Zarillo, Chapter 14: Comprehension: Instruction and Assessment-Understanding and Analyzing Narrative/Literary Texts, Section 1.I

List eight major genres of children’s books



Domain 5 Comprehension: Competency 14-Narrative/Literary Texts  

List eight major genres of children’s books




Domain 5 Comprehension: Competency 14-Narrative/Literary Texts

1. Traditional literature or folktales


2. Modern fantasy


3. High Fantasy


4. Science Fiction


5. Contemporary Realistic Fiction


6. Historical Fiction


7. Biography


8. Poetry




Reference Zarillo, Chapter 14: Comprehension: Instruction and Assessment-Understanding and Analyzing Narrative/Literary Texts, Section 1

Which of the following is not  a poetry genre per the RICA Content Specifications:  Ballad, Lyric, Couplet, Prose, Epic, or Sonnet   
Domain 5 Comprehension: Competency 14-Narrative/Literary Texts    

Which of the following is not a poetry genre per the RICA Content Specifications: Ballad, Lyric, Couplet, Prose, Epic, or Sonnet


Domain 5 Comprehension: Competency 14-Narrative/Literary Texts

A. Ballad (Correct): A form of poetry that tells a story and is usually set to music.


B. Lyric (Correct): Words of a song or a poem that expresses personal feeling. A sonnet is a type of lyric poetry.


C. Prose (Incorrect): The ordinary language people use in speaking or writing


D. Couplet (Correct): A pair of lines in a peom that usually rhymes and has the same meter


E. Epic (Correct): A long poem telling a story, usually about heroic deeds


F. Sonnet (Correct): A form of lyric poetry with 14 lines. Sonnets have a strict rhyming scheme and a strict internal structure or meter.




Reference Zarillo, Chapter 14: Comprehension: Instruction and Assessment-Understanding and Analyzing Narrative/Literary Texts, Section 1.h

List and describe four writing activities with literature



Domain 5 Comprehension: Competency 14-Narrative/Literary Texts   

List and describe four writing activities with literature




Domain 5 Comprehension: Competency 14-Narrative/Literary Texts

Format-Literature Journals: Students should keep records of the books they have read. One way is to have students keep a journal dedicated to their reading experiences with literature (also called literature logs, literature journals or reading logs).


Format-Essays: Students can use a separate sheet of paper to answer literary analysis prompts. Older students can be challenged to include topic sentences and supporting details.


Topics-The Literary Elements: Answer questions on character, plot, setting, theme, mood, and style.


Topics-Features of the Genres: Students write on the features or characteristics of a book’s genre. Ex. Students look at the settings of their book and doing a comparison/contrast with other books of the same genre.




Reference Zarillo, Chapter 14: Comprehension: Instruction and Assessment-Understanding and Analyzing Narrative/Literary Texts, Section 5

What are three ways to help struggling readers or readers with learning disabilities read textbooks?

What are three ways to help struggling readers or readers with learning disabilities read textbooks?




Domain 5 Comprehension: Competency 15-Expository/Informational Text

Recording-Record a chapter and tape for struggling readers to listen to prior to being asked to read the chapter


Read Aloud-Where the teacher reads aloud portions of a chapter either before, during, or after students are asked to read the chapter


Additional Vocabulary Instruction-Struggling readers can be given additional instruction in key vocabulary before being asked to read a chapter




Reference Zarillo, Chapter 15: Comprehension: Instruction and Assessment-Expository/Informational Texts and Study Skills, Section 7.A.1

Most Expository texts have standard patterns or structures.  Name five.



Domain 5 Comprehension: Competency 15-Expository/Informational Text   

Most Expository texts have standard patterns or structures. Name five.




Domain 5 Comprehension: Competency 15-Expository/Informational Text

1. Cause and Effect: Where some phenomena results from some other phenomena.


2. Problem and Solution: Where the author presents a problem and then provides an explanation for the reader.


3. Compare/Contrast: Where the writer examines the similarities and differences among two or more items, possibly using Venn diagrams.


4. Sequence: Where the author lists items or events in numerical or chronological order


5. Description: Where the author describes a topic by listing characteristics or features.




Reference Zarillo, Chapter 15: Comprehension: Instruction and Assessment-Expository/Informational Texts and Study Skills, Section 5

Name some organizational/explanatory feature of text that can assist reading comprehension.

Domain 5 Comprehension: Competency 15-Expository/Informational Text     

Name some organizational/explanatory feature of text that can assist reading comprehension.




Domain 5 Comprehension: Competency 15-Expository/Informational Text

1. The table of contents


2. Index


3. Glossary


4. Guide Words-Words appearing at the top of a page, particularly for dictionaries or encyclopedias




Reference Zarillo, Chapter 15: Comprehension: Instruction and Assessment-Expository/Informational Texts and Study Skills, Section 3.A

Define the following study skills:  Skimming, Scanning, In-depth reading, and SQ3R



Domain 5 Comprehension: Competency 15-Expository/Informational Text   

Define the following study skills: Skimming, Scanning, In-depth reading, and SQ3R




Domain 5 Comprehension: Competency 15-Expository/Informational Text

Skimming-Fast reading of a text, usually for purposed of preview or review. In this activity the reader focuses on key words, subtitles, and important sentences.


Scanning-Rapid reading to find specific information.


In-Depth reading-This is very careful reading aiming for a full understanding of the information presented.


SQ3R-Survey, Question, Read, Recite, and Review.




Reference Zarillo, Chapter 15: Comprehension: Instruction and Assessment-Expository/Informational Texts and Study Skills, Section 3.A

List four ways a teacher can assess the comprehension of expository texts



Domain 5 Comprehension: Competency 15-Expository/Informational Text   

List four ways a teacher can assess the comprehension of expository texts




Domain 5 Comprehension: Competency 15-Expository/Informational Text

1. Using Text Structures-The teacher can provide a “skeleton” (ex. a Venn diagram or other graphic organizer) for the student to complete.


2. Multilevel Questions-The teacher uses the QAR system to create simple tests of a student’s comprehension especially with higher order inference and evaluation skills.


3. Teacher Observation/Anecdotal Records-Teachers can gather useful data by observing student behavior and taking notes. Ex. Noting how quickly and thoroughly students answer comprehension questions from their textbooks.


4. Readabilty of Texts-[Note Readability-A measure of the difficulty of a text]. Teachers can match the readability of a text agains the child’s independent, instructional, and frustration reading levels to determine how well or if a text “fits” a child’s reading ability.




Reference Zarillo, Chapter 15: Comprehension: Instruction and Assessment-Expository/Informational Texts and Study Skills, Section 8

 Name the five different types of vocabulary



Domain 4:  Vocabulary, Academic Language, and Background Knowledge  

Name the five different types of vocabulary




Domain 4: Vocabulary, Academic Language, and Background Knowledge

Listening vocabulary-The words you understand when listening to other people speak


Speaking vocabulary-The words you use when you talk (smaller than listening vocabulary).


Writing vocabulary-The words you use when you write


Sight (reading) vocabulary-The words you can recognize and correctly pronounce.


Meaning (reading) vocabulary-The words you understand when reading silently.




Reference Zarillo, Chapter 10 Vocabulary, Academic Language, and Background Knowledge: Role in Reading Development and Factors that Affect Development, Introduction.

What three factors determine how we prioritize vocabulary



Domain 4:  Vocabulary, Academic Language, and Background 

What three factors determine how we prioritize vocabulary




Domain 4: Vocabulary, Academic Language, and Background

Frequency-This is how often students will encounter a word when they read.


Utility-This is how often students want to write the word.


Level of Knowledge-The less students know about a word the more important it is to teach it.




Reference Zarillo, Chapter 10 Vocabulary, Academic Language, and Background Knowledge: Role in Reading Development and Factors that Affect Development, Section 3.A

What are the three different Tiers of General Academic Vocabulary



Domain 4:  Vocabulary, Academic Language, and Background   

What are the three different Tiers of General Academic Vocabulary




Domain 4: Vocabulary, Academic Language, and Background

First Tier-These are simple words most children know without instruction (Ex. flower, water, rain).


Second Tier-These are more difficult words that appear in several contexts across two or more areas of study. Ex. Words that may be seen in Science and Social Studies such as peninsula, territory, nautical, climate, and tropical.


Third TIer-The most difficult words since they are used only in one specific “domain” or specific area of study. Ex. Science vocabulary such as unicellular, protozoa, and amoeba.




Reference Zarillo, Chapter 10 Vocabulary, Academic Language, and Background Knowledge: Role in Reading Development and Factors that Affect Development, Section 3.B

Define Academic Language



Domain 4:  Vocabulary, Academic Language, and Background     

Define Academic Language




Domain 4: Vocabulary, Academic Language, and Background

Academic language is the language used in texbooks and tests-it is the language of the classroom.




Reference Zarillo, Chapter 10 Vocabulary, Academic Language, and Background Knowledge: Role in Reading Development and Factors that Affect Development, Introduction

Name six strategies for developing word consciousness in students.





Domain 4:  Vocabulary, Academic Language, and Background     

Name six strategies for developing word consciousness in students.




Domain 4: Vocabulary, Academic Language, and Background

1. Synonyms and Antonyms-Teach lessons and play games with synonyms and antonyms


2. Homophones and Homographs-Do activities with homophones (words with the same sounds) and homographs (words that are spelled the same and have different pronunciation or definitions).


3. Word of the Day-This is a daily word displayed in large letters with its definition, in isolation and in contextPlaying with Words:


4. Idioms and Puns-Have students build collections and illustrations of idioms (phrases that are commonly used but are not taken literally) and puns (humorous play with words that have more than one meaning and sound the same)


5. Playing with Words: Poetry-This includes writing different forms of poetry (ex. haiku, limerick).


6. Etymology-This is the history and development of a word.




Reference Zarillo, Chapter 11 Vocabulary, Academic Language, and Background Knowledge: Instruction and Assessment, Section 4

Name four types of contextual analysis



Domain 4:  Vocabulary, Academic Language, and Background   

Name four types of contextual analysis




Domain 4: Vocabulary, Academic Language, and Background

Definition contextual clues-This is when the author provides a definition for the target word in texts. This is very common in school textbooks.


Synonym contextual clues-This is when another word in the paragraph is a synonym for the target word.


Antonym contextual clues-This is when another word in the paragraph is an antonym for the target word.


Example contextual clues-This is when the author has provided a definition of the word by listing examples of the word in the text.




Reference Zarillo, Chapter 11 Vocabulary, Academic Language, and Background Knowledge: Instruction and Assessment, Section 3.B

What are four ways to assess vocabulary and academic language using tests



Domain 4:  Vocabulary, Academic Language, and Background     

What are four ways to assess vocabulary and academic language using tests




Domain 4: Vocabulary, Academic Language, and Background

1. State Standardized tests


2. Use of the word in a sentence/multiple answer options--The most valid form of assessment. The student identifies the target word, which is either underlined or italicised based on its use in context.


3. Choosing a synonym-Identify a synonym for the word


4. Analogies-Providing two words that have a relationship and then showing an additional word with a blank (where the student fills in the blank based on the defined relationship).




Reference Zarillo, Chapter 11 Vocabulary, Academic Language, and Background Knowledge: Instruction and Assessment, Section 8

One effective way to teach the meaning of English words to English Learners is cognates.  Explain this strategy.



Domain 4:  Vocabulary, Academic Language, and Background       

One effective way to teach the meaning of English words to English Learners is cognates. Explain this strategy.




Domain 4: Vocabulary, Academic Language, and Background

Cognates-Cognates are words that look alike and mean the same thing in two languages. Examples for English/Spanish are air/aire, active/activo or activa, artist/artista, and color/color.




Reference Zarillo, Chapter 11 Vocabulary, Academic Language, and Background Knowledge: Instruction and Assessment, Section 7.B.1

List and define three instructional activities to support what students have learned



Domain 4:  Vocabulary, Academic Language, and Background 

 

List and define three instructional activities to support what students have learned




Domain 4: Vocabulary, Academic Language, and Background

Listening/Speaking-Students can improve their vocabularies, knowledge of academic language, and background knowledge through Read Alouds (listening) and discussions (speaking)


Reading/Writing-After learning the meanings of words, students should have reading assignments that include the target words they have learned.


Structure of the English Language-


* Sentence Structure


* Syntax


* Punctuation and Capitalization




Reference Zarillo, Chapter 11 Vocabulary, Academic Language, and Background Knowledge: Instruction and Assessment, Section 6

Explain how building knowledge of English morphemes helps English Learners and Speakers of Nonstandard English with vocabulary



Domain 4:  Vocabulary, Academic Language, and Background   

Explain how building knowledge of English morphemes helps English Learners and Speakers of Nonstandard English with vocabulary




Domain 4: Vocabulary, Academic Language, and Background

Building Knowledge of English Morphemes-By teaching English learners the meaning of common English roots, prefixes, and suffixes allows them to independently figure out the meanings of words. Note: Many English and Spanish affixes have similar pronunciations and the same meaning.




Reference Zarillo, Chapter 11 Vocabulary, Academic Language, and Background Knowledge: Instruction and Assessment, Section 7.B.3

Name and describe the three indicators of reading fluency



Domain 3:  Fluency:  Role in Reading Development and Factors That Affect the Development of Fluency  

Name and describe the three indicators of reading fluency




Domain 3: Fluency: Role in Reading Development and Factors That Affect the Development of Fluency

1. Accuracy-How fluent readers demonstrate pronouncing words correctly through application of phonics skills, sight words knowledge, structural analysis skills, syllabic analysis skills and orthographic knowledge.


2. b-How fluent readers read at text at an appropriate rate using:


* The ability to quickly decode words


* The ability to speedily read phrases and sentences


3. Prosody-How fluent readers read with appropriate “expression” including emphasis of certain words, variation in pitch, and pausing.




Reference Zarillo, Chapter 9 Fluency: Role in Reading Development and Factors That Affect the Development of Fluency, Section 1.

List and describe the Factors that Can Disrupt Fluency



Domain 3:  Fluency:  Role in Reading Development and Factors That Affect the Development of Fluency    

List and describe the Factors that Can Disrupt Fluency




Domain 3: Fluency: Role in Reading Development and Factors That Affect the Development of Fluency

1. Weak word analysis skills which leads to stopping frequenctly to decode unrecognized or unfamiliar words


2. Lack of Familiarity with Content Vocabulary


3. Lack of Background Knowledge


4. Lack of Familiarity with More Complex Syntactic Structures




Reference Zarillo, Chapter 9 Fluency: Role in Reading Development and Factors That Affect the Development of Fluency, Section 4.

Discuss Two Strategies That Can Make Independent Silent Reading More Effective in Supporting Fluency Development



Domain 3:  Fluency:  Role in Reading Development and Factors That Affect the Development of Fluency      

Discuss Two Strategies That Can Make Independent Silent Reading More Effective in Supporting Fluency Development




Domain 3: Fluency: Role in Reading Development and Factors That Affect the Development of Fluency

1. Select books at an appropriate level


2. Hold Students Accountable for Comprehension-This includes student-maintained reading logs, book reports, oral presentations, partner reading/discussion, and individual conferences.




Reference Zarillo, Chapter 9 Fluency: Role in Reading Development and Factors That Affect the Development of Fluency, Section 7

Discuss Three Ways to Assess Prosody



Domain 3:  Fluency:  Role in Reading Development and Factors That Affect the Development of Fluency     

Discuss Three Ways to Assess Prosody




Domain 3: Fluency: Role in Reading Development and Factors That Affect the Development of Fluency

During an oral reading a teacher should listen for:


1. Appropriate Pitch-The student's voice rises and falls at appropriate times


2. Appropriate Response to Punctuation-The student pauses for commas, semicolons, stops at the ends of sentences, uses correct inflection for question and appropriate emotion for exclamation marks.


3. AppropriateCharacterization-Where the child becomes an actor and sounds like the character should sound




Reference Zarillo, Chapter 9 Fluency: Instruction and Assessment, Section 6

Discuss how echo (or imitative) reading can help an English Learner or Speaker of Nonstandard English improve fluency



Domain 3:  Fluency:  Role in Reading Development and Factors That Affect the Development of Fluency       

Discuss how echo (or imitative) reading can help an English Learner or Speaker of Nonstandard English improve fluency




Domain 3: Fluency: Role in Reading Development and Factors That Affect the Development of Fluency

Echo or imitative reading is an intervention that provides modeling and phrase-cued reading. The teacher reads a passage aloud and then the students read it aloud with the teacher. English learners also need to be taught the meaning of English pronunciation.




Reference Zarillo, Chapter 9 Fluency: Instruction and Assessment, Section 5

How can you best analyze, interpret, and use results?

Domain 3:  Fluency:  Role in Reading Development and Factors That Affect the Development of Fluency    

How can you best analyze, interpret, and use results?




Domain 3: Fluency: Role in Reading Development and Factors That Affect the Development of Fluency

Analysis and interpretation of assessments results should be standards-based


* Is the student below expectations


* At expectations or


* Above expectations


For those below expectations, why are the below expectations?




Note: Fluency standards are set at each grade level and are broadly stated.




Reference Zarillo, Chapter 11 Vocabulary, Academic Language, and Background Knowledge: Instruction and Assessment, Section 6.C.2

While observing a small group of students during guided practice the teacher may do the following:
(a) Question the students to see if they can explain what they are doing. 
(b) Provide feedback, noting when students are doing things correctly, ...

While observing a small group of students during guided practice the teacher may do the following:


(a) Question the students to see if they can explain what they are doing.


(b) Provide feedback, noting when students are doing things correctly, while pointing out mistakes and offering suggestions for those who are on the wrong track.


(c) Reinforce what has been learned by re-modeling a process.


(d) All of the above




Domain 1: Planning, Organizing, and Managing Reading Instruction Based on Ongoing Assessment

D All of the above




Reference Zarillo, Chapter 1: Competency 1 Planning, Organizing and Managing Reading Instruction (Section 4C)

What are the four phases of effective teaching that are included in the CA Reading and Language Arts Framework?


A. direct instruction, independent practice, group practice, test
B. overview of expectations, direct instruction, guided practice...

What are the four phases of effective teaching that are included in the CA Reading and Language Arts Framework?


A. direct instruction, independent practice, group practice, test


B. overview of expectations, direct instruction, guided practice, independent practice.


C. direct instruction, guided practice, independent practice, group practice


D. overview of expectations, direct instruction, test, independent practice.


Domain 1: Planning, Organizing, and Managing Reading Instruction Based on Ongoing Assessment



B. direct instruction, guided practice, independent practice, group practice




Reference Zarillo, Chapter 1: Competency 1 Planning, Organizing and Managing Reading Instruction



The California Reading/Language Arts Framework of 2007 provides the guidelines
(a) what should be taught at each grade level and how to assess student 
(b) what should be taught based on IQ and how to assess students
(c) what should be taugh...

The California Reading/Language Arts Framework of 2007 provides the guidelines


(a) what should be taught at each grade level and how to assess student


(b) what should be taught based on IQ and how to assess students


(c) what should be taught based on reading level and how to assess these levels


(d) what should be taught at each grade level and how to group students




Domain 1: Planning, Organizing, and Managing Reading Instruction Based on Ongoing Assessment

(a) what should be taught at each grade level and how to assess student




Reference Zarillo, Chapter 1: Competency 1 Planning, Organizing and Managing Reading Instruction (Section 1B)

In a balanced, comprehensive instructional reading program, each skill taught will be given equal time. (a) true(b) false





Domain 1:  Planning, Organizing, and Managing Reading Instruction Based on Ongoing Assessment

  

In a balanced, comprehensive instructional reading program, each skill taught will be given equal time. (a) true(b) false




Domain 1: Planning, Organizing, and Managing Reading Instruction Based on Ongoing Assessment

False




Reference Zarillo, Chapter 1: Competency 1 Planning, Organizing and Managing Reading Instruction (Section 1B1)

Students should receive direct, explicit instruction in reading skills and strategies but they will not begin to read a variety of text until 3rd grade.  (a) True  (b) False 





Domain 1:  Planning, Organizing, and Managing Reading Inst...

Students should receive direct, explicit instruction in reading skills and strategies but they will not begin to read a variety of text until 3rd grade. (a) True (b) False




Domain 1: Planning, Organizing, and Managing Reading Instruction Based on Ongoing Assessment

False




Reference Zarillo, Chapter 1: Competency 1 Planning, Organizing and Managing Reading Instruction (Section 1B2)



When planning for a reading lesson, instructional decisions should be based on:
(a) the student’s grade level
(b) the results of ongoing assessments
(c) the student’s interests
(d) formal outlined curriculum



Domain 1:  Planning, Or...

When planning for a reading lesson, instructional decisions should be based on:


(a) the student’s grade level


(b) the results of ongoing assessments


(c) the student’s interests


(d) formal outlined curriculum




Domain 1: Planning, Organizing, and Managing Reading Instruction Based on Ongoing Assessment

(b) the results of ongoing assessments




Reference Zarillo, Chapter 1: Competency 1 Planning, Organizing and Managing Reading Instruction (Section 1C)

 When teaching reading, an example of a direct and explicit skill and strategy lesson would be a:
(a) Teacher- directed lesson, taught to the whole class with the goal of introducing a skill.
(b) Teacher- directed lesson, taught to a small group ...

When teaching reading, an example of a direct and explicit skill and strategy lesson would be a:


(a) Teacher- directed lesson, taught to the whole class with the goal of introducing a skill.


(b) Teacher- directed lesson, taught to a small group of students who share a common need.


(c) Peer-led discussion following a whole class lesson.


(d) Teacher-directed lesson which provide guided practice for skills taught.




Domain 1: Planning, Organizing, and Managing Reading Instruction Based on Ongoing Assessment

(b) Teacher- directed lesson, taught to a small group of students who share a common need.




Reference Zarillo, Chapter 1: Competency 1 Planning, Organizing and Managing Reading Instruction (Section 1C)

The main goal of systematic and explicit reading instruction is: 
(a) determining if a child needs remediation.
(b) determine if a child is gate eligible
(c) prevent reading difficulties
(d) activate a desire to read





Domain 1:  Plannin...

The main goal of systematic and explicit reading instruction is:


(a) determining if a child needs remediation.


(b) determine if a child is gate eligible


(c) prevent reading difficulties


(d) activate a desire to read




Domain 1: Planning, Organizing, and Managing Reading Instruction Based on Ongoing Assessment

(c) prevent reading difficulties




Reference Zarillo, Chapter 1: Competency 1 Planning, Organizing and Managing Reading Instruction (Section 1D)

Standardized reading assessments are valuable to the teacher as they allow them to: 
A. compare the reading performance of individual students to the other students in the class.
B.  characterize the student’s reading proficiency in terms of ...

Standardized reading assessments are valuable to the teacher as they allow them to:


A. compare the reading performance of individual students to the other students in the class.


B. characterize the student’s reading proficiency in terms of typical grade level performance.


C. test many skills at once and provide results that can be used to obtain a general overview of student’s performance.


D. all of the above




Domain 1: Planning, Organizing, and Managing Reading Instruction Based on Ongoing Assessment

D. all of the above




Reference Zarillo, Chapter 1: Competency 1 Planning, Organizing and Managing Reading Instruction



Maria is a second grade, English Language learner who is struggling with reading. What is one effective strategy for implementing differentiated instruction?
A. Have Maria listen to books on tape and answer comprehension questions.
B. Group ...

Maria is a second grade, English Language learner who is struggling with reading. What is one effective strategy for implementing differentiated instruction?


A. Have Maria listen to books on tape and answer comprehension questions.


B. Group Maria with students who share the same needs and reteach concepts.


C. Have Maria read 20 minutes each night at home


D. Have Maria participate in whole group lessons with the anticipation that she will be remediated in the future.




Domain 1: Planning, Organizing, and Managing Reading Instruction Based on Ongoing Assessment

B. Group Maria with students who share the same needs and reteach concepts.




Reference Zarillo, Chapter 1: Competency 1 Planning, Organizing and Managing Reading Instruction

What are the 5 key factors in differentiating reading instruction?





Domain 1:  Planning, Organizing, and Managing Reading Instruction Based on Ongoing Assessment  

What are the 5 key factors in differentiating reading instruction?




Domain 1: Planning, Organizing, and Managing Reading Instruction Based on Ongoing Assessment

a. collect data on the students’ knowledge and skills


b. analyze data on the students’ prerequisite knowledge and skills


c. makes instructional pacing decisions


d. determines the complexity of the content/skill when planning for differentiation.


e. provides for scaffolds




Reference Zarillo, Chapter 1: Competency 1 Planning, Organizing and Managing Reading Instruction

Discussions about literature can motivate students to read and provide a lifelong appreciation for literature. Name three formats for small group discussions:





Domain 1:  Planning, Organizing, and Managing Reading Instruction Based on On...

Discussions about literature can motivate students to read and provide a lifelong appreciation for literature. Name three formats for small group discussions:




Domain 1: Planning, Organizing, and Managing Reading Instruction Based on Ongoing Assessment

1. Book clubs


2. Literature circles


3. Author studies




Reference Zarillo, Chapter 1: Competency 1 Planning, Organizing and Managing Reading Instruction (section 5D)

Under the teacher’s guidance, a small group of students meet to read and read Island of the Blue Dolphins. They discuss the following question, “What makes this author’s book so special? This is an example of the following:
A Literature cir...

Under the teacher’s guidance, a small group of students meet to read and read Island of the Blue Dolphins. They discuss the following question, “What makes this author’s book so special? This is an example of the following:


A Literature circle


B. Student read aloud


C. Book club


D. Author Study




Domain 1: Planning, Organizing, and Managing Reading Instruction Based on Ongoing Assessment

D. Author Study




Reference Zarillo, Chapter 1: Competency 1 Planning, Organizing and Managing Reading Instruction (section 5D)

Independent reading plays a critical role in a child’s overall development. What are five potential advantages of independent reading?





Domain 1:  Planning, Organizing, and Managing Reading Instruction Based on Ongoing Assessment  

Independent reading plays a critical role in a child’s overall development. What are five potential advantages of independent reading?




Domain 1: Planning, Organizing, and Managing Reading Instruction Based on Ongoing Assessment

1. Provides greater familiarity with language patterns


2. Increases reading fluency


3. Increases vocabulary


4. Broadens knowledge in content areas5.


5. Motivates further reading.




Reference Zarillo, Chapter 1: Competency 1 Planning, Organizing and Managing Reading Instruction (section 6)

A student is reading a text, he reads "The horse has a big yard." rather than what the text actually states, "The house has a big yard". What type of strategy would you use with this student?







A.  Ask the student to retell what he ha...

A student is reading a text, he reads "The horse has a big yard." rather than what the text actually states, "The house has a big yard". What type of strategy would you use with this student?




A. Ask the student to retell what he has just read. If he does a good job retelling, there is no need to go back over the error.


B. Have the student practice the misread word over and over.


C. Praise the student for reading so well.


D. Ask the student to look at the sentence again, and then asks the student: "Does that make sense? Let’s look at the word carefully, letter-by-letter"




Domain 1: Planning, Organizing, and Managing Reading Instruction Based on Ongoing Assessment

D. Ask the student to look at the sentence again, and then asks the student: "Does that make sense? Let’s look at the word carefully, letter-by-letter"





When choosing a “just right” book at the correct independent reading level students can use the following methods:
(a.)  The five finger test (read a page with at least 50 words, each time the student comes across a word they can not read th...

When choosing a “just right” book at the correct independent reading level students can use the following methods:


(a.) The five finger test (read a page with at least 50 words, each time the student comes across a word they can not read they hold up a finger. If they hold up 5 fingers they waive good-bye to the book.


(b.) Choose a book that is within 2 letters of their tested level.


(c.) Choose a book that is listed on the recommended reading list for their grade.


(d.) Any of the above




Domain 1: Planning, Organizing, and Managing Reading Instruction Based on Ongoing Assessment


(a.) The five finger test (read a page with at least 50 words, each time the student comes across a word they can not read they hold up a finger. If they hold up 5 fingers they waive good-bye to the book.




Reference Zarillo, Chapter 1: Competency 1 Planning, Organizing and Managing Reading Instruction (section 6A)



During sustained silent reading: 
(a.)  The teacher chooses the reading material, (book, magazine, newspaper) and the students read silently
(b.)  The students choose the reading material (book, magazine, newspaper) and they read silently...

During sustained silent reading:


(a.) The teacher chooses the reading material, (book, magazine, newspaper) and the students read silently


(b.) The students choose the reading material (book, magazine, newspaper) and they read silently


(c.) The student chooses the reading material and they read in pairs.


(d.) The students choose the reading material, but it must be a book.




Domain 1: Planning, Organizing, and Managing Reading Instruction Based on Ongoing Assessment

(b.) The students choose the reading material (book, magazine, newspaper) and they read silently




Reference Zarillo, Chapter 1: Competency 1 Planning, Organizing and Managing Reading Instruction (section 6C)

Name four methods for monitoring student independent reading.   



Domain 1:  Planning, Organizing, and Managing Reading Instruction Based on Ongoing Assessment    

Name four methods for monitoring student independent reading.




Domain 1: Planning, Organizing, and Managing Reading Instruction Based on Ongoing Assessment

1. Student –maintained reading logs


2. Book reports


3. Formal and informal oral presentations


4. Individual conferences




Reference Zarillo, Chapter 1: Competency 1 Planning, Organizing and Managing Reading Instruction (section 6E)

Name the three types of assessments as defined by the California Reading/Language Arts Framework. 





Domain 1:  Planning, Organizing, and Managing Reading Instruction Based on Ongoing Assessment     

Name the three types of assessments as defined by the California Reading/Language Arts Framework.




Domain 1: Planning, Organizing, and Managing Reading Instruction Based on Ongoing Assessment

1. entry-level assessments


2. monitoring of progress assessments


3. summative assessments




Reference Zarillo, Chapter 2 Competency 2 Reading Assessment (section 1)

Give an example of ways in which a teacher can differentiate an assessment for a student with special needs. 



Domain 1:  Planning, Organizing, and Managing Reading Instruction Based on Ongoing Assessment    

Give an example of ways in which a teacher can differentiate an assessment for a student with special needs.




Domain 1: Planning, Organizing, and Managing Reading Instruction Based on Ongoing Assessment

1. Give students more time


2. Divide the assessment into smaller units


3. Change the mode of delivery


4. Provide practice assessments


5. Provide a smaller version of the assessment




Reference Zarillo, Chapter 2 Competency 2 Reading Assessment (section 2)



A stanine Score is: 
(a.)  Norm-referenced score which is converted to a nine-point scale
(b.)  Norm-referenced score which is converted to a school grade equivalent
(c.)  Norm-referenced score which is converted to a percentile score
(d...

A stanine Score is:


(a.) Norm-referenced score which is converted to a nine-point scale


(b.) Norm-referenced score which is converted to a school grade equivalent


(c.) Norm-referenced score which is converted to a percentile score


(d.) Non norm-referenced score which is converted to a 10-point scale




Domain 1: Planning, Organizing, and Managing Reading Instruction Based on Ongoing Assessment

(a.) Norm-referenced score which is converted to a nine-point scale




Reference Zarillo, Chapter 2 Competency 2 Reading Assessment (section 3)

What are the three main purposes of word recognition lists?

Domain 1:  Planning, Organizing, and Managing Reading Instruction Based on Ongoing Assessment   

What are the three main purposes of word recognition lists?




Domain 1: Planning, Organizing, and Managing Reading Instruction Based on Ongoing Assessment

1 To provide a rough guess of the child’s reading level.


2. To provide information on the child’s “sight vocabulary”


3 To provide information about the child’s ability to use sound-symbol relationships. To decode words.




Reference Zarillo, Chapter 2 Competency 2 Reading Assessment (section 5)

 A student that makes several graphophonemic errors during a running records assessment:  
A. Is making syntactic errors  
B. Is relying on a semantic cueing system  
C. Is depending on phonics to decode words  
D. Is reading a book that ...

A student that makes several graphophonemic errors during a running records assessment:


A. Is making syntactic errors


B. Is relying on a semantic cueing system


C. Is depending on phonics to decode words


D. Is reading a book that is too easy for them




Domain 1: Planning, Organizing, and Managing Reading Instruction Based on Ongoing Assessment



C. Is depending on phonics to decode words




Reference Zarillo, Chapter 2 Competency 2 Reading Assessment (section 5-3)

What are the three reading levels? 



Domain 1:  Planning, Organizing, and Managing Reading Instruction Based on Ongoing Assessment   

What are the three reading levels?




Domain 1: Planning, Organizing, and Managing Reading Instruction Based on Ongoing Assessment

1 Independent Reading Level (can be read an understood without assistance)


2. Instructional Reading Level (can be read and understood with help)


3. Frustration Reading Level (Cannot be read and understood by the child, even with help)




Reference Zarillo, Chapter 2 Competency 2 Reading Assessment (section 5-B)

 What are five ways to teach phonological awareness (including phonemic awareness)?
During an oral reading a teacher should listen for:



Domain 3:  Word Analysis

What are five ways to teach phonological awareness (including phonemic awareness)?


During an oral reading a teacher should listen for:




Domain 3: Word Analysis

1. Word Awareness-The goal here is to help children become aware that sentences are made up of words.


2. Syllable Awareness-Syllable awareness will be more difficult for most children since syllables, by themselves are meaningless. However, activities such as clapping their hands to each syllable will help syllable awareness.


3. Word Blending-In this task, the child is challenged to take two single-syllable words and combine them to make a compound word.


4. Syllable Blending-Children are required to blend two syllables in a word. Ex. sis + ter = sister


5. Onset and Rime Blending-Where the teacher would say the onset and the rime and the children have to put them together. Ex. /b/ + /ank/ = bankReference




Zarillo, Chapter 3 Phonological and Phonemic Awareness, Section 2.A

Studies show phonemic awareness skills developed in Spanish transfer to english.  What strategies can a teacher take in teaching EL students about phonemes?



Domain 3:  Word Analysis  

Studies show phonemic awareness skills developed in Spanish transfer to english. What strategies can a teacher take in teaching EL students about phonemes?




Domain 3: Word Analysis

1. Explicit teaching of English phonemes that do not exist in an EL’s first language (nontransferable phonemes). For example, the letter “h” at the beginning of wrods in English does not exists in Spanish.


2. Explicit teaching of sequences of phonemes that do not exist in the student’s first language. For example, sc-, sk-, sm-, sn-, sp-, st-, and sw-.




Reference Zarillo, Chapter 3 Phonological and Phonemic Awareness, Section 4.B

What Four Topics Constitute Concepts About Print?

Domain 3:  Word Analysis

What Four Topics Constitute Concepts About Print?




Domain 3: Word Analysis

1. The Relationship Between Spoken and Written English and that Print Carries Meaning-Children should be aware that printed words are “talk written down”.


2. Recognizing Letter, Word, and Sentence Representation-It is the knowledge of the differences between letters, words, and sentences.


3. Directionality of Print/Tracking of Print-English is read left to right and top to bottom.


4. Book-handling skills-How to hold a book when reading, where the front cover of the book is, where the title page is, where the story starts, when and how to turn the pages, and the location of the back cover of a book.




Reference Zarillo, Chapter 4 Concepts About Print, Letter Recognition, and the Alphabetic Principle, Section 4.1

Describe the Language Experience Approach (LEA).



Domain 3:  Word Analysis

Describe the Language Experience Approach (LEA).




Domain 3: Word Analysis

The LEA approach has a child share an experience and then dictate an account of that experience to an adult who records it verbatim. Together, the adult and the child read the dictated text which is saved and bound in a child’s personal reading book.




Reference Zarillo, Chapter 4 Concepts About Print, Letter Recognition, and the Alphabetic Principle, Section 4.B.3

 
Discuss some challenges that some EL students may have with Directionality and Tracking of Print.



Domain 3:  Word Analysis


Discuss some challenges that some EL students may have with Directionality and Tracking of Print.




Domain 3: Word Analysis

If a child has learned to read in any of the Latin or German-based languages they will already understand directionality and tracking of print. Other languages such as Arabic, Hebrew, Chinese, and Japanese have a different direction.




Reference Zarillo, Chapter 5 Phonics and Sight Words: Terminology and Concepts, Section 5.B.4

Discuss Common Word Patterns of Increasing Difficulty



Domain 3:  Word Analysis

Discuss Common Word Patterns of Increasing Difficulty




Domain 3: Word Analysis

VC (am, it, up, etc.)


CVC (man, pet, lip, etc.)


CVCC (balk, cost, film, etc.)


CCVC (brat, clap, skip, etc.)


CVVC (bait, tea, goat, etc.)


CVCE (made, like, cone, etc.).




Note: Exceptions exist such as “love” and “live”




Reference Zarillo, Chapter 5 Phonics and Sight Words: Terminology and Concepts, Section 5.2.D

Discuss two fundamental phonics strategies



Domain 3:  Word Analysis

Discuss two fundamental phonics strategies




Domain 3: Word Analysis

1. Systematic, Direct, and Explicit


2. Direct, Explicit Teaching of Phonics


a. Whole-to-Part Lessons


b. Part-to-Whole Lessons




Reference Zarillo, Chapter 6 Phonics and Sight Words: Instruction and Assessment, Section 1

Discuss Specific Strategies to Teach Phonics/Sight Words to EL and SEL students.


Domain 3:  Word Analysis

Discuss Specific Strategies to Teach Phonics/Sight Words to EL and SEL students.




Domain 3: Word Analysis

1. Capitalize on transfer of relevant knowledge and skills form the primary language


2. Explicitly teaching sounds that do not transfer


3. Explicitly teaching the meanings of sight words, if needed


4. Analyze Patterns of Error




Reference Zarillo, Chapter 6 Phonics and Sight Words: Instruction and Assessment, Section 6.5.B

For Struggling Students and Students with Reading Disabilities what Key Skills Can the Teacher Highlight to Support These Students?



Domain 3:  Word Analysis

For Struggling Students and Students with Reading Disabilities what Key Skills Can the Teacher Highlight to Support These Students?




Domain 3: Word Analysis

1. Common Prefixes (pre-, fore-, sub-, sup-, etc.)


2. Common Suffixes (-ful, -ion, -ness, etc.)


3. Orthographic patterns (Dropping the final “e” when adding -ing, doubling a final consonant when adding -ing, etc.)




Reference Zarillo, Chapter 7 Syllabic Analysis, Structural Analysis, and Orthographic Knowledge, Section 7.5.A.1

Describe Assessment of Structural Analysis Skills, Syllabic Analysis Skills, and Orthographic Knowledge



Domain 3:  Word Analysis

Describe Assessment of Structural Analysis Skills, Syllabic Analysis Skills, and Orthographic Knowledge




Domain 3: Word Analysis



1. Structural Analysis


a. Prefixes, Suffixes, and Roots


b. In isolation


c. In context


2. Syllabic Analysis


a. In isolation


b. In Context


3. Spelling


a. In isolation-Spelling test


b. In context-If students spell words correctly when they write




Reference Zarillo, Chapter 7 Syllabic Analysis, Structural Analysis, and Orthographic Knowledge, Section 7.6.A