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64 Cards in this Set

  • Front
  • Back
M proteins are specific to what strain of bacteria?
S. pyogenes
S. pyogenes is sensitive to which antibiotic
Bacitracin
Group A specific carbohydrates
rhamnose
N-acetylglosamine
What are five suppurative diseases of S. pyogenes
pharyngitis(strep throat/scarlet fever)
impetigo
erysipelas
cellulitis
necrotizing fascitis
S. pyogenes is belongs to which Lancefield group
A
S. pyogenes is ____-hemolytic
Beta
M protein is an adhesin as well as an ____.
Antiphagocytic factor
pyogenic exotoxins mode of action
act like superantigens, toxic shock
action of steptolysins S and O
lyses red blood cells
action of streptokinases A and B
lyses blood clots
streptodornases (DNase B)
degrade DNA in pus to reduce viscosity
hyaluronidase
lyses hyaluronic acid in connective tissue
S. agalactiae belongs to which Lancefield group
B
S. agalactiae is ___-hemolytic
beta
S. agalactiae kills what.
babies
S. agalactiae produces which 3 important factors
CAMP
hippurate
C protein
what does CAMP do?
enhances hemolytic activity of Staphyl. aureus
group B carbohydrates
polymer of rhamnose
N-acetylglucosamine
galactose
S. penumoniae is ___-hemolytic
alpha
What is a major virulence factor in S. pneumoniae?
capsule (only in virulent strains produce capsules)
most S. pneumoniae infections are endogenous or person-to-person
endogenous (normal flora of throat)
S. pneumoniae causes which diseases
otis media (inflam. of middle ear)
pneumonia (of course)
meningitis
What are the 3 tests for S. pneumoniae?
optochin sensitivity
bile solubility
quellung reaction
S. bovis is an indication for what disease
colon cancer
Viridans streptococcis leads to what complication?
endocarditis especially after dental manipulation
Enterococci is ___-hemolytic
gamma
Enterococci causes what diseases
urinary tract infection
bacteremia and endocarditis
what is enterococci notorious for?
intrinsic antibiotic resistance
spore formers are always gram +/-
gram +
What are 3 exotoxins of B. anthracis
protective antgien (PA)-required for virulence
lethal factor (LF)
edema factor (EF)
the capsule of B. anthracis contains what?
poly-D-glutamate polypeptide (not a carb)
(antiphagocytic)
Can B. anthracis form spores?
You betcha!
Which bacteria is a true zoonotic pathogen
B. anthracis
Cutaneous infeciton of B. anthracis forms what?
malignant pustules
how is B. anthracis most lethal?
inhalation
gastrointestinal anthrax causes what
ulcers at site of invasion
What are some characteristics of B. anthracis colonies
non-hemolytic
medusa-head
sticky
Bacillus cereus is often found where and causes what?
rice, food poisoning
can B. cereus form spores
You betcha!
does B. cereus have a capsule?
nope
what are 2 types of food poisoning by B. cereus?
emetic form (vomiting, heat-stable)
diarrheal form (heat-labile)
Clostridium:
spores or no spores?
motile or non-motile?
spores and motile
clostridium:
aerobic or anaerobic?
anaerobic
Clostridium perfringens Type A produces which lethal toxin? (most common type)
alpha
C. perfringens causes which soft-tissue infections? (think perfume)
cellulitis (w/ gas formation)
suppurative myositis
myonecrosis (gas gangrene)
injested C. perfringens can cause which complications?
food poisoning
gastroenteritis
necrotizing enteritis (pig-bel, type C strain)
What are the two lab diagnostics used for C. perfringens?
lecthinanase activity (alpha toxin+egg yolk=precipitate)
double zone hemolysis (beta hemolysis surrounded by alpha hemolysis)
C. tetani looks like a ___ and causes which disease?
tennis racket, tetanus
virulence factor of C. tetani
tetanospasmin (tetanus toxin)
tetanospasmin is what type of toxin?
neurotoxin and A/B toxin
mode of action of tetanospasmin?
A domain blocks release of inhib GABA
B domain binds nerve membrane
3 types of tetanus
generalized (most common)
localized
neonatal
lab diagnosis of C. tetani
clinical presentation, usually lockjaw
appears as film on agar plate, not colonies
does C. botulinum form spores?
yes
Botulinum toxin characteristics and mode of action
neurotoxin
A/B toxin
A domain inhibits Ach realease, leading to no contraction
how is typically C. botulinum acquired?
canned foods, honey
(cannot be transmitted from person to person)
C. botulinum diseases
infant botulism
foodborne botulism (neither emetic nor diarrheal)
wound botulism (rare)
inhalation botulism (bioterrorism)
infant botulism leads to what type of baby
floppy
is C. difficile a food poisoning pathogen
NO!
virulence factors of C. difficile
exotoxin A: increase permeability of intestines (diarrhea)
exotoxin B: cytotoxin that damages mucosa and causes pseudomembrane formation
exposure to antibiotics is associated with overgrowth of C. difficile, leading to which GI diseases
antibiotic associated diarhea (AAD)
antibiotic induced pseudomembranous colitis
can C. difficile be transmitted from person to person?
yes
what is the lab diagnosis for C. difficile?
ELISA detection of exotoxin B in stool
Clostridium septicum is an indication of what?
colon cancer