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99 Cards in this Set

  • Front
  • Back
abase
behave in a way that belittles or degrades (someone).
addle
make (someone) unable to think clearly; confuse.
affable
friendly, good-natured, or easy to talk to.
alimentary
relating to nourishment or sustenance.
Andy and Bill's law
a statement that new software will always consume any increase in computing power that new hardware can provide.
apartheid
(in South Africa) a policy or system of segregation or discrimination on grounds of race.
asperger's syndrome
a developmental disorder related to autism and characterized by higher than average intellectual ability coupled with impaired social skills and restrictive, repetitive patterns of interest and activities.
aspersion
an attack on the reputation or integrity of someone or something.
autarky
economic independence or self-sufficiency.
baleful
threatening harm; menacing.
beguile
charm or enchant (someone), sometimes in a deceptive way.
benighted
in a state of pitiful or contemptible intellectual or moral ignorance, typically owing to a lack of opportunity.
bulwark
a defensive wall.
cacophony
a harsh discordant mixture of sounds.
categorical imperative
(in Kantian ethics) an unconditional moral obligation which is binding in all circumstances and is not dependent on a person's inclination or purpose.
chagrin
distress or embarrassment at having failed or been humiliated.
cherubic
having the childlike innocence or plump prettiness of a cherub.
churlish
rude in a mean-spirited and surly way.
comportment
behavior; bearing.
consign
deliver (something) to a person's custody, typically in order for it to be sold.
conspicuous
standing out so as to be clearly visible.
consternation
feelings of anxiety or dismay, typically at something unexpected.
contrail
a trail of condensed water from an aircraft or rocket at high altitude, seen as a white streak against the sky.
coterie
a small group of people with shared interests or tastes, especially one that is exclusive of other people.
countenance
a person's face or facial expression.
cudgel
a short, thick stick used as a weapon.
curmudgeon
a bad-tempered person, especially an old one.
derrière
euphemistic term for a person's buttocks.
despotism
the exercise of absolute power, especially in a cruel and oppressive way.
didactic
intended to teach, particularly in having moral instruction as an ulterior motive.
diffident
modest or shy because of a lack of self-confidence.
discomfit
make (someone) feel uneasy or embarrassed.
dissonance
lack of harmony among musical notes.
echolalia
meaningless repetition of another person's spoken words as a symptom of psychiatric disorder.
ecumenical
representing a number of different Christian Churches.
effusive
expressing feelings of gratitude, pleasure, or approval in an unrestrained or heartfelt manner.
equanimity
mental calmness, composure, and evenness of temper, especially in a difficult situation.
erudition
the quality of having or showing great knowledge or learning; scholarship.
extirpate
root out and destroy completely.
extricate
free (someone or something) from a constraint or difficulty.
facile
(especially of a theory or argument) appearing neat and comprehensive only by ignoring the true complexities of an issue; superficial.
flagrant
(of something considered wrong or immoral) conspicuously or obviously offensive.
foible
a minor weakness or eccentricity in someone's character.
ford
a shallow place in a river or stream allowing one to walk or drive across.
fulcrum
the point on which a lever rests or is supported and on which it pivots.
furor
an outbreak of public anger or excitement.
gird
encircle (a person or part of the body) with a belt or band.
gregarious
(of a person) fond of company; sociable.
grist
grain that is ground to make flour.
guarantor
a person, organization, or thing that guarantees something.
hemlock
a highly poisonous European plant of the parsley family, with a purple-spotted stem, fernlike leaves, small white flowers, and an unpleasant smell.
highfalutin
(especially of speech, writing, or ideas) pompous or pretentious.
iconoclastic

characterized by attack on cherished beliefs or institutions.

idiosyncratic
relating to idiosyncrasy; peculiar or individual.
idyllic
(especially of a time or place) like an idyll; extremely happy, peaceful, or picturesque.
inchoate
just begun and so not fully formed or developed; rudimentary.
inerrant
incapable of being wrong.
iniquity
immoral or grossly unfair behavior.
intransigent
unwilling or refusing to change one's views or to agree about something.
irascible
having or showing a tendency to be easily angered.
jurisprudence
the theory or philosophy of law.
lampoon
publicly criticize (someone or something) by using ridicule, irony, or sarcasm.
lurid
very vivid in color, especially so as to create an unpleasantly harsh or unnatural effect.
maladroit
ineffective or bungling; clumsy.
milieu
a person's social environment.
misanthrope
a person who dislikes humankind and avoids human society.
mollify
appease the anger or anxiety of (someone).
nexus
a connection or series of connections linking two or more things.
nocebo
a detrimental effect on health produced by psychological or psychosomatic factors such as negative expectations of treatment or prognosis.
nostrum
a medicine, especially one that is not considered effective, prepared by an unqualified person.
ostentation
pretentious and vulgar display, especially of wealth and luxury, intended to impress or attract notice.
paragon
a person or thing regarded as a perfect example of a particular quality.
parochial
relating to a church parish.
paucity
the presence of something only in small or insufficient quantities or amounts; scarcity.
pejorative
expressing contempt or disapproval.
penchant
a strong or habitual liking for something or tendency to do something.
perdition
(in Christian theology) a state of eternal punishment and damnation into which a sinful and unpenitent person passes after death.
poseur
another term for poser; a person who acts in an affected manner in order to impress others.
precarious
not securely held or in position; dangerously likely to fall or collapse.
presentiment
an intuitive feeling about the future, especially one of foreboding.
profane
treat (something sacred) with irreverence or disrespect.
prosaic
having the style or diction of prose; lacking poetic beauty.
prostatitis
inflammation of the prostate gland.
recrimination
an accusation in response to one from someone else.
reproach
address (someone) in such a way as to express disapproval or disappointment.
rueful
expressing sorrow or regret, especially when in a slightly humorous way.
salacious
having or conveying undue or inappropriate interest in sexual matters.
salient
most noticeable or important.
scourge
cause great suffering to.
squalid
(of a place) extremely dirty and unpleasant, especially as a result of poverty or neglect.
trenchant
vigorous or incisive in expression or style.
trifling
unimportant or trivial.
troika
a group of three people working together, especially in an administrative or managerial capacity.
vacillate
alternate or waver between different opinions or actions; be indecisive.
variegated
exhibiting different colors, especially as irregular patches or streaks.
verisimilitude
the appearance of being true or real.
vertiginous
causing vertigo, especially by being extremely high or steep.
vicissitude
a change of circumstances or fortune, typically one that is unwelcome or unpleasant.
winnowing
blow a current of air through (grain) in order to remove the chaff.