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271 Cards in this Set

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Pusillanimous
Lacking in courage

courage (pusill(us) very small, petty + -anim(is) -spirited, -minded (anim(us) spirit + -is adj. suffix)
Cloying
Sickeningly sweet

(in- + Latin clāvāre, to nail)
Doctrinaire
Rigidly devoted to theories without regard for practicality, dogmatic

(doctrīna teaching, equiv. to doct(o)r DOCTOR + -īna -INE2 ] )
Meretricious
Falsely attractive, OR related to a prostitute

(meretrix prostitute, from merēre to earn)
Invective
Abusive language
Sardonic
Cynical, mocking scornfully. Disdainfully humourous
Peregrinate
To travel, esp. on foot
Decorous
Socially correct

(think decorum)
Lugubrious
Mournful, dismal

(lygros mournful)
Diffident
Lacking self-confidence

(dis- + fidere to trust)
Inchoate
Being only partially formed or in existence OR incoherent

(in- + cohum part of a yoke to which the beam of a plow is fitted)
Exigent
Urgent

[exigere to demand]
Die
A tool used for shaping
Mercenary
A greedy person, or one who is only motivated by money in doing a job
Strut
A structural piece that resists pressure in the direction of its length. OR a pompous step or walk
Literati
A member of an educated class
Signatory
One who signes, or people who are bound by an agreement
Beam
The part of a plow to which handles, standard, and coulter are attached
Covetous
Very greedy
Rapacious
Excessively covetous, extremely greedy
Pundit
An authority. A learned person
Divestiture
To get rid of property, to take away
Burnish
To make shiny or brown by rubbing, to polish or rub
Dampen
To become depressed
Ardor
Zeal, or warmth of feeling
Lustrous
Radiant, but in an even, efficient way (no glitter)
Sinuous
Having a serpentine form
Centrifuge
A machine that uses centrifugal forces to separate densities
Intransigent
Uncompromising
Refractory
Resisting control OR unresponsive to stimulus
Laconinc
Sparse with words, to the point of being rude
Sordid
Muddy or nasty, vile, muddy, greedy
Odious
Deserving hatred
Volubility
Rapid speech, OR quickly turning


[volvere to roll]
Abrogate
To abolish

[ab- + rogare to ask, propose a law]
Sedulous
Diligent and hard working
Incursion
A hostile entrance to a territory
Propitate
To appease

[propicius < L propitius favorably inclined, propitious, prob. equiv. to pro- pro-1 + -pit-, comb. form of petere to head for, resort to, solicit + -ius]
Edify
To instruct in moral/ religious knowledge, or to uplift

(think 'educate')
Cavalier
Debonair, nonchalant.Or disdainfully dismissive
Indelicate
Improper
Amortize
To gradually write off a debt or to write off an expenditure
Minatory
Threatening
Emaciate
To make feeble

[e- + macies leanness, from macer lean]
Innundate
To cover with a flood of

[in- + unda wave]
Bombast
Pretentious, inflated speech

[bombac-, bombax cotton, alteration of Latin bombyc-, bombyx silkworm, silk, from Greek bombyk-, bombyx]
Excoriation
To wear off skin

[ex- + corium skin, hide]
Haughty
Blatantly and disdainfully proud

[high, from Latin altus]
Chary
Discreetly cautious, slow to accept. Or hesitant

[caru sorrow — more at care]
Usury
Interest, like charging a high interest
Circumspect
Investigating all possibilities, prudent, cautious
Cavern
To hollow out. Or, one of indefinie extent
Epithet
A disparaging comment (think "racial epithet"}
Turpitude
Inherent baseness

think: Moral turpitude

[turpis- Vile or base]
Viscid
Covered with a sticky layer, or having an adhesive quality
Philistine
An artless, materialistic person. Or a person uninformed about a certain subject.
Miser
1. A person who lives in wretched circumstances in order to save and hoard money

2. A mean grasping person; especially (esp. one who is extremely stingy with money)
Functionary
1. A person who functions in a specific capacity (esp. in government).
2. An office-holder
Raconteur
A person who is skilled in relating stories and anecdotes interestingly.

[re- + aconter, acompter to tell, count]
Calipers
1. Any of various calibrated instruments for measuring thicknesses or distance

2.Thickness or depth, as of paper or a tree
Sextant
An astronomical instrument used to determine latitude and longitude at sea by measuring angular distances, esp. the altitudes of sun, moon, and stars.
Feint
1.Mock blow or attack on or toward one part in order to distract attention from the point one really intends to attack

2.A feigned or assumed appearance

[feint pretended, ptp. of feindre to feign]
Dodge
1. To elude or evade by a sudden shift of position or by strategy

2. To evade a responsibility or duty especially by trickery or deceit (like, to dodge the draft)

3. To move aside or change position suddenly, as to avoid a blow or get behind something.
Cordon
1. A line of police, sentinels, military posts, warships, etc., enclosing or guarding an area.

2. A cord or braid worn for ornament or as a fastening.

[MF, dim. of corde]
Moat
A deep, wide trench, usually filled with water, surrounding the rampart of a fortified place, as a town or a castle.
Conviviality
1. Friendly; agreeable (like, a convivial atmosphere)

2. Fond of feasting, drinking, and merry company; jovial

[feast (convīv(ere) to live together, dine together (con- con- + vīvere to live]
Martial
1. Inclined or disposed to war; warlike

[Mārtiālis of, belonging to Mars]
Limn
1. To represent in drawing or painting.

2. To portray in words; describe in sharp detail

[luminen to illuminate]
Parse
1. To describe (a word in a sentence) grammatically, identifying the part of speech, inflectional form, syntactic function, etc.

[pars ōrātiōnis part of speech]
Stint
1. To be frugal; get along on a scanty allowance (like, to stint on food)

2. a period of time spent doing something

3. Imitation or restriction, esp. as to amount: to give without stint.

[styntan to make blunt, dull]
Curator
one who has the care and superintendence of something

[cūrā(re) to care for, attend to ]
Prevaricate
To speak falsely or misleadingly; deliberately misstate or create an incorrect impression; lie.

[praevaricari to act in collusion, literally, to straddle]
Perjury
Intentionally giving a false testimony. False swearing.

[per- through, i.e., beyond the limits (see per-) + jūrāre to swear, lit., to be at law]
Dormancy
State of being dormant: Temporarily in abeyance yet capable of being activated

[dormir to sleep]
Burgeon
1. To grow or develop quickly; flourish
2. To send forth new growth (as buds or branches)

[burion; shoot, bud]
Occult
1. Beyond the range of ordinary knowledge or understanding; mysterious

2. Secret or hidden from view

3. Verb: To hide


[occultus (ptp. of occulere to hide from view, cover up), equiv. to oc- oc- + -cul-, akin to célāre]
Nascent
Beginning to exist or develop
Disburse
1. To pay out (money), esp. for expenses; expend

2. To distribute, scatter

[borser, deriv. of borse purse ]
Abridge
1. To shorten by omissions while retaining the basic contents

2. To reduce or lessen in duration

[ad- + brevis shor]
Extenuating
1. To represent as less serious, severe (extenuating circumstances)

2. To underestimate, underrate, or make light of

[ex- ex-1 + tenuāre to make thin or small]
Intractable
Not easily controlled or directed; not docile or manageable; stubborn; obstinate

[in + tractā(re) to handle, deal with]
Pastoral
Having the simplicity, charm, serenity, or other characteristics generally attributed to rural areas

[pāstor shepherd]
Padding
1. Something added unnecessarily or dishonestly, as verbiage to a speech or a false charge on an expense account.
2. To go on foot

[pad path]
Cloudburst
1. A sudden and very heavy rainfall

2. A sudden outpouring : deluge
Fracas
A noisy brawl

[fracassare to shatter]
Harrow
1. To disturb keenly or painfully; distress the mind, feelings, etc., of.

2. A cultivating implement set with spikes, spring teeth, or disks and used primarily for pulverizing and smoothing the soil
Boor
1. A churlish, rude, or unmannerly person

[bū- to dwell, build, cultivate]

Synonyms (good for the GRE's): lout, oaf, boob, churl, philistine, vulgarian.
Sodden
1. Dull or expressionless especially from continued indulgence in alcoholic beverages

2. Soaked with liquid or moisture; saturated

Synonym: Torpid

[oden, sothen, ptp. of sethen to seethe]
Gainsay
1. To deny, contradict, speak against

[again, say]
Nice
1. Having fastidious, finicky, or fussy tastes

2. Characterized by, showing, or requiring great accuracy, precision, skill, tact, care, or delicacy

3. Minute, fine, or subtle

[foolish, stupid < OF: silly, simple < L nescius ignorant, incapable, equiv. to ne- negative prefix + sci- (s. of scīre to know; see science)]
Punctilious
Marked by or concerned about precise accordance with the details of codes or conventions
Obviate
1. to anticipate and prevent or eliminate (difficulties, disadvantages, etc.) by effective measures

2. Render unnecessary.

(like, to obviate the risk of drowning)

[obviare to meet, withstand]
Sanction
1. To authorize, approve, or allow

2. To impose a sanction on; penalize, esp. by way of discipline.

3. Something that gives binding force, as to an oath, rule of conduct, etc.

[sancire to make holy]
Approbation
An act of approving formally or officially
Unencumbered
1. Not burdened with care or responsibility.

2. Property that is not subject to any creditor claims or lien
Territoriality
1. Attachment to or protection of a territory or domain

2. Behavior associated with defense of a territory
Ledger
1. A book containing accounts to which debits and credits are posted from books of original entry

2. Horizontal board used for vertical support

[leger large breviary, beam, probably from leyen, leggen to lay]
Rumination
1. To meditate or muse; ponder.

2. To chew over and over again
Castigate
To subject to severe punishment, reproof, or criticism

[driven to be faultless (ptp. of castigāre to chasten), equiv. to cast(us) pure, chaste + -īg-, comb. form of agere to drive, incite + -ātus -ate]
Reagent
A substance used (as in detecting or measuring a component, in preparing a product, or in developing photographs) because of its chemical or biological activity

[re(act) + agent; cf. act]]
Summarily
1. Comprehensive

2. Done without delay or formality

[summa sum]
Stolid
Not easily stirred or moved mentally; unemotional; impassive

[stolidus dull, stupid]
Asperity
1. Rigor, severity

2. Roughness of surface : unevenness

3. Harshness or sharpness of tone, temper, or manner; severity; acrimony

[asperitās, equiv. to asper rough]
Desultory
1. Marked by lack of definite plan, regularity, or purpose. Jumping around and unconnected.

2. Disappointing in progress, performance, or quality

[de- + salire to leap]
Adroit
1. Expert or nimble in the use of the hands or body

2. Having or showing skill, cleverness, or resourcefulness in handling situations

[droit, dreit straight, just, correct]
Procure
1. Get possession of

2. Bring about, achieve

[pro- for + cura care]
Innundate
1. Cover with a flood
2. Overwhelm

[in- + unda]
Flourish
1. To grow luxuriantly, or thrive in growth, as a plant
2. To achieve success
3. To make bold and sweeping gestures
4. An act or instance of brandishing (to shake or wave)
5. An ostentatious display.
6. A florid bit of speech or writing
7. A sudden burst

[flōrére to bloom]
Idyll
1. A simple poem or prose about rustic life or pastoral scenes suggesting a mood of peace and contentment
2. A romantic interlude
3. A composition, usually instrumental, of a pastoral or sentimental character.

[Greek idein to see]
Inimical
Being adverse often by reason of hostility or malevolence

[inimicus enemy ]
Hack
1. To cut or sever with repeated irregular or unskillful blow
2. Loaf
3. Annoy or vex
4. To damage or injure by crude, harsh, or insensitive treatment; mutilate; mangle
5. Working for hire especially with mediocre professional standard
Mar
1. To detract from the perfection or wholeness of
Mettle
Strength of spirit
Erudition
Extensive knowledge acquired chiefly from books : profound, recondite, or bookish learning
Esoterica
1. Designed for or understood by the specially initiated alone (private, confidential)

2. Of special, rare, or unusual interest

[esō within]
Hew
1. To strike forcibly with an ax, sword, or other cutting instrument; chop; hack
2. To fell by blows of an ax
3. Conform, adhere

[Latin cudere to beat]


To fell with an ax
Mince
1. To cut into small pieces
2. To soften, moderate, or weaken (one's words), esp. for the sake of decorum or courtesy.
3. To walk with short steps in a prim affected manner
Whet
1. To sharpen by grinding or friction
2. To make something more acute
Superimpose
1. To place or lay over or above something
2. To put or join as an addition
Fell
1. Skin, hide, pelt
2. To cut (saw) down
3. To knock, strike, shoot, or cut down; cause to fall

[fel skin, Latin pellis]
Gouge
Improper extraction
Splice
1. To unite by overlapping and securing together two ends
2. Marriage, wedding
Denunciation
1. An act or instance of denouncing (esp. publicly)
2. An accusation of crime before a public prosecutor or tribunal.
Heavy- handed
1. Clumsy
2. Oppressive, harsh
Sap
1. A foolish gullible person
2. To drain or deprive
3. Undermine
4. A vital body fluid
Convoluted
1. Involved, intricate
2. Twist, coil
Mitigate
1. To make less severe or intense

[mītigātus (ptp. of mītigāre to calm, soften, soothe), equiv. to mīt(is) mild, soft, gentle + -ig- (comb. form of agere to do, cause to do, make)]
Preponderate
1. To exceed something else in weight; be the heavier
2. To be superior in power, force, influence, number, amount

[prae- + ponder-, pondus weight]
Extrapolate
1. To infer from values already obtained, conjecture.
Torpor
Sluggish, dormant

[torp(ére) to be stiff or numb]
Zenith
The highest point, culmination
Nadir
The lowest point. Point of greatest adversity
Venal
1. Able to be purchased, as by a bribe
2. Having to do with corrupt bribery

(vasna price, I think vendor)
Unstinting
Bestowed liberally
Peripatetic
1. Walking or traveling about, itinerant

[peri- + patein to tread; akin to Sanskrit patha path]
Dwindle
1. To become smaller and smaller.
2. To degenerate
3. To cause to shrink
Elegy
A mournful, melancholy, or plaintive poem, esp. a funeral song or a lament for the dead.

[éleg(os) a lament]
Paean
Any song of praise, joy, or triumph.

[Paean appellation of Apollo < Gk Pain physician of the gods]]
Encomium
1. Glowing and warmly enthusiastic praise;
2. An expression of this

Synonyms: encomium, eulogy, panegyric, tribute, citation

[en in + kōmos revel, celebration]
Tangential
1. Divergent, digressive
2. Slightly connected
3. Incidental, peripheral
Spurious
1. Counterfeit, not genuine
2. Bastard (illegitimate)

[spurius, noun, bastard]
Abated
1. To moderate
2. To deprive
3. To deduct or omit

[abatre to strike down]
Engendered
To bring into existence

[in- + generare to generate]
Recondite
1. Dealing with very profound, difficult, or abstruse subject matter
2. Little known; obscure

[econditus recondite, hidden (orig. ptp. of recondere to hide), equiv. to re- re- + cond(ere) to bring together]
Subsume
1. To include or place within something larger or more comprehensive.
2. To encompass as a subordinate or component element

<red, green, and yellow are subsumed under the term “color”>

[sub- + sumere to take up]
Sume (this is a Latin root word)
To take
(ex. Subsume, assume, resume)
Elegy
A mournful, melancholy, or plaintive poem, esp. a funeral song or a lament for the dead.
Despotic
Of, pertaining to, or of the nature of a despot or despotism; autocratic; tyrannical
Interpolate
1. To estimate values of (data or a function) between two known values
2. To alter or corrupt (as a text) by inserting new or foreign matter

[interpolare to refurbish, alter, interpolate, from inter- + -polare]
Dwindle
To become smaller and smaller
Paean
Any song of praise, joy, or triumph
Encomium
A formal expression of high praise; eulogy

[en in + kōmos revel, celebration]
Slack
1. Negligent; careless; remiss
2. Not tight, taut, firm, or tense
Jocular
Joking or jesting; waggish; facetious
Inimitable
Incapable of being imitated or copied; surpassing imitation; matchless
Disinter
1. To take out of the place of interment; exhume; unearth
2. To bring back into awareness or prominence
Diatribe
A bitter, sharply abusive denunciation, attack, or criticism

[dia- + tribein to rub]
Hoodwink
To dupe
Magnanimous
1. Showing or suggesting a lofty and courageous spirit
2. High-minded, noble

[magn(us) magn- + anim(us) spirit, soul, mind]
Plaintive
Expressing sorrow or melancholy; mournful

[plaintif grieving, from Anglo-French pleintif, plaintif, from plaint]
Decimation
1. To reduce drastically especially in number
2. To select by lot and kill every tenth person of
Platitudinous
Full of platitudes (platitudes are: flat, dull, or trite remarks, esp. uttered as if they were fresh or profound.)

[plat flat (see plate1) + -itude, as in F latitude, altitude, magnitude, etc.]]
Spendthrift
Wastefully extravagant; prodigal
Foil
1. Metal in the form of very thin sheets
2. To thwart or defeat
Abscond
To depart in a sudden and secret manner

[abs- + condere to store up, conceal]
Quaff
To drink a beverage, esp. an intoxicating one, copiously and with hearty enjoyment
Trudge
To walk, esp. laboriously or wearily
Dolt
A dull, stupid person; blockhead

[dullen to dull]
Slab
1. A broad, flat, somewhat thick piece of stone, wood, or other solid material
2. To put on thickly
Nave
1. The principal longitudinal area of a church
2. The hub of a wheel
Frieze
1. Sculptured or richly ornamented band

2. The part of a classical entablature between the architrave and the cornice, usually decorated with sculpture in low relief.
Rarefy
1. To make rare, thin, porous, or less dense
2. To make more spiritual, refined, or abstruse
Impetuous
1. Of sudden or rash action, emotion, etc.; impulsive
Foment
To promote the growth or development of : rouse, incite

Synonyms: Incite, provoke, arouse, inflame, excite, stir up; encourage, stimulate
Squelch
1. To fall or stamp on so as to crush
2. To put down, suppress, or silence, as with a crushing retort or argument.
3. To make a splashing sound
Inchoate
1. Rudimentary. Just begun.
2. Lacking order.
Tyro
A novice
Nib
1. A point of anything (like of a pen)
2. Bill or beak
Husk
1. The enveloping or outer part of anything, esp. when dry or worthless
2. The outer layer (like, of a fruit or seed)
Miser
1. A stingy, greedy person
2. A person who lives in bad conditions to hoard money
Lien
The legal claim of one party upon the property of another party (to secure the payment of a debt obligation). Repo!

[ligare to bind ]
Corpuscle
1. An unattached cell, esp. of a kind that floats freely, as a blood or lymph cell.
2. A minute particle
Floridness
1. Flowery; excessively ornate; showy
2. Reddish; ruddy; rosy

[flōr(ére) to bloom]
Superintend
To oversee and direct (work, processes, etc.).
Churlish
Mean, rude, boorish
Flatter
1. To praise or compliment insincerely, effusively, or excessively
2. To try to please by complimentary remarks or attention
Sidereal
Relating to the stars
Subpoena
A writ commanding a person designated in it to appear in court under a penalty for failure

[sub poena under penalty]
Preside
To occupy the place of authority or control, as in an assembly or meeting; act as president or chairperson.
Toy
1. to act or deal with something lightly or without vigor or purpose
2. Something of little importance; a trifle
Rent
1. A split in a party or organized group
2. to take and hold (property, machinery, etc.) in return for the payment of rent to the landlord or owner.
Tenuous
1. Thin or slender in form, as a thread
2. Having little substance or strength : flimsy, weak
3. Long (I think GRE uses it this way).


[tenuis thin]
Opprobrium
A cause of shame

[ob in the way of + probrum reproach]
Derision
To laugh at in scorn or contempt; scoff or jeer at; mock

[dé- de- + rīdére to laugh]
Ostracism
Exclusion from social acceptance, privileges, friendship, etc.
Demagogue
1. A person who gains power by arousing the emotions, passions, and prejudices of the people
2. To obscure or distort with emotionalism, prejudice, etc.
Prone
1. Lying flat; prostrate.
2. Having a downward direction or slope.

[prōnus turned or leaning forward, inclined downward,]
Waft
1. To float or be carried, esp. through the air
2. A sound, odor, etc., faintly perceived
Skim
1. To move or glide lightly over or along (a surface, as of water)
Fatuous
1. Foolish or inane
2. Unreal, illusory
Idolatry
Excessive or blind adoration
Idiosyncrasy
Eccentricity. Something peculiar to a person.

[idio- + synkerannynai to blend, from syn- + kerannynai to mingle, mix]
Commensurate
1. Corresponding in amount, magnitude, or degree.
2. Proportionate; adequate.

[com- com- + ménsūrātus]
Garrulous
Excessively talkative
Schematic
Pertaining to or of the nature of a schema, diagram, or scheme; diagrammatic
Finicky
Excessively particular or fastidious; difficult to please; fussy
Obstinate
Firmly or stubbornly adhering to one's purpose, opinion, etc.; not yielding.

[ob- in the way + -stinare (akin to stare to stand)]
Positivistic
Theory that theology and metaphysics are earlier imperfect modes of knowledge and that positive knowledge is based on natural phenomena and their properties and relations as verified by the empirical sciences.
Regale
1. To entertain lavishly or agreeably; delight
2. To entertain with a feast

[gale festivity, like gala]
Rogue
1. A dishonest, knavish person; scoundrel.
2. To cheat.
3. No longer obedient, belonging, or accepted and hence not controllable or answerable
Veracious
Truthful
Precipitate
To hasten the occurrence of; bring about prematurely, hastily, or suddenly



[steep, headlong (prae- pre- + -cipit-, comb.form of caput head]
Prolixity
Extended to great, unnecessary, or tedious length; long and wordy.

[prō- pro-1 + -lixus, akin to līquī to flow]
Mettlesome
Spirited; courageous

[mettle: Courage and fortitude]
Feckless
1. Ineffective; incompetent; futile
2. worthless, irresponsible

[effeck (Scots form of effect) + -less] ]
Touting
1. Promote, talk up
2. To watch or spy on
3. To solicit patronage

[tuten to protrude, peer; probably akin to Old English tōtian to stick out,]
Foolhardy
Foolishly adventurous and bold : rash
Cumbersome
1. Burdensome; troublesome.
2. Slow-moving, ponderous
Culpability
Guilty, blameworthy

[culpā(re) to hold liable (deriv. of culpa blame]
Probity
Adherence to the highest principles and ideals. Uprightness.

[probus honest]
Guile
Insidious cunning in attaining a goal; crafty or artful deception; duplicity

[akin to wile]
Reproof
1. the act of reproving, censuring, or rebuking.
2. An expression of censure or rebuke.
(rebuke means to reprimand)
Gristle
Cartilage, esp. in meats
Colander
A metal or plastic container with a perforated bottom, for draining and straining foods.

[cōlā(re) to strain]
Intemperate
1. Characterized by excessive or indulgence in alcoholic beverages.
2. not temperate <intemperate criticism>
Precept
1. A command intended as a general rule of action
2. Maxim.

[praecipere to direct, foresee, lit., to take beforehand, equiv. to prae- pre- + -cep-, comb. form of capere to take]
Peremptory
1.Leaving no opportunity for denial or refusal; imperative
2. Positive or assertive in speech, tone, manner

[per- thoroughly + emere to take]
Accretion
1. The process of growth or enlargement by a gradual buildup
2. An added part; addition

[ac- ac- + cré- grow]
Gilb
1. Marked by ease and informality. Nonchalant.
2. Superficial
3. Readily fluent, often thoughtlessly, superficially, or insincerely so

[glibbery slippery]
Cadge
To beg

[cadger carrier, huckster]
Abjure
1. To avoid or shun
2. To renounce, repudiate, or retract

[ab, away,- + jurare to swear]
Specious
1. Having deceptive attraction or allure
2. Having a false look of truth or genuineness

[peciōsus fair, good-looking]
Quotidian
Occurring every day


[quotidie every day, from quot (as) many as + dies day]
Commingle
To blend thoroughly into a harmonious whole.To mix or mingle together; combine
Dilate
1. to enlarge or expand in bulk or extent. To distend

[dis- + latus wide]
Coalescing
1. To unite
2. To grow together

[co- + alescere to grow]
Dissipating
1. To break up and drive off (as a crowd)
2. To be extravagant or dissolute in the pursuit of pleasure
3. To waste foolishly

[dis- + supare to throw]
Momentous
Important
Univocal
Unambiguous. Having only one meaning.

[uni- + voc-, vox voice]
Intractable
Not easily governed, managed, or directed. Stubborn, obstinate.

[in- + tractabilis tractable]
Extol
To praise highly, glorify

[ex- + tollere to lift up]
Transmute
To change or alter in form, appearance, or nature and especially to a higher form

[trans- + mutare to change]
Impassivity
Apathetic or expressionless

Synonyms: impassive, stoic, phlegmatic, apathetic, stolid
Throwback
1. Reversion to an earlier type or phase. Atavism (means the same thing as throwback). [atta familiar name for a grandfather + avus grandfather, forefather]

2. A setback or check
Magistrate
An official entrusted with administration of the laws.

[magister master, political superior]
Shuck
1. Shell or husk (of an oyster or veggie, nut)
2. Something of little value
Damp
1. Discouragement or check
2. To check or retard the energy, action, etc. of something
3. Music. to check or retard the action of (a vibrating string); dull; deaden.
Abraded
1.To rub or wear away especially by friction
2. To wear down in spirit

[ab- + radere to scrape]
Quarry
1. An open excavation usually for obtaining building stone, slate, or limestone
2. One that is pursued, prey
Fell
1. Skin, hide, pelt
2. To cut, knock, or bring down
3. Fierce, cruel, terrible. sinister, malevolent. Sharp, pungent
Dredge
1. To dig, gather, or pull out with or as if with a dredge
2. A machine for removing earth usually by buckets on an endless chain or a suction tube
Assay
1. Analysis
2. Try, attempt, test
Credulous
Ready to believe especially on slight or uncertain evidence
Industrialist
One owning or engaged in the management of an industry
Elegy
1. A poem in elegiac couplets
2. A song or poem expressing sorrow or lamentation especially for one who is dead
Distillate
The process of purifying a liquid by successive evaporation and condensation
Anodized
To subject (a metal) to electrolytic action as the anode of a cell in order to coat with a protective or decorative film
Stanch
To check or stop the flowing of

[stāns, prp. of stāre to stand]
Effrontery
Insolence, shameless boldness

[ex- + front-, frons forehead]
Scurvy
1. Arousing disgust or scorn. Contemptible, despicable
2. A disease caused by a lack of vitamin C
Complaisant
Marked by an inclination to please or oblige

[complaire to gratify, acquiesce]
Aver
1. To verify or prove to be true in pleading a cause
2. To allege or assert in pleading

[ad- + verus true]
Pith
1. The essential part. Core
2. Importance

[pit pith, pit]
Supine
1. Exhibiting indolent or apathetic inertia or passivity. Especially, mentally or morally slack

2. Lying on the back or with the face upward

[sub under, up to]
Transitory
Temporary.

[transitorius, from Latin, of or allowing passage, from transire]

The pain of the GRE's is only transitory. At least I hope so.
Gossamer
1. Something light, delicate, or insubstantial

2. A fine, filmy cobweb seen on grass or bushes or floating in the air in calm weather, esp. in autumn.

[goose + somer summer. Go to dictionary.com for more info!]

(antonym= Ponderous)
Tortuous
1. Marked by repeated twists, bends, or turns : winding

2. Not direct or straight-
forward,as in procedure or speech; intricate; circuitous

[Latin tortuosus, from tortus twist, from torquēre to twist]

(antonym= Straightforward)
Dispatch
1. Archaic. to hasten; be quick (this is the def. that ETS uses)
2. To send off or away with promptness or speed
3. To defeat

[des- dis- + -pechier (as in enpechier to ensnare)]

(antonym= Liesurliness)
Ferment
1. A state of unrest or agitation
2. Foment (to work up)

[ermentāre to cause to rise]

antonym: Uphold
Plethora
1. Excess, superfluity
2. Profusion, abundance

antonym: dearth

[plēthōra, literally, fullness, from plēthein to be full]
Abrogate
1. To abolish by authoritative action (to annul)

[ab- + rogare to ask, propose a law]

antonym: uphold