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43 Cards in this Set

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The process used for identifying the different carbohydrates of streptococci is called
A. Lancefield grouping.
b. CHO typing.
c. streptococci.
d. fermentation testing.
A Lancefield grouping.
Rebecca Lancefield showed that almost all the strains of b-hemolytic streptococci
from human infections
a. could cause rheumatic fever.
B. had the same cell wall carbohydrate "A".
c. had variable cell wall carbohydrates.
d. responded to penicillin.
B had the same cell wall carbohydrate "A".
The scientist who developed a system of identifying the variety of strains of
streptococci was
a. Hans Zimmer.
b. Donald Sutherland.
c. O. T. Avery.
D. Rebecca Lancefield.
D Rebecca Lancefield.
Enlargement of which of the following structures may contribute to ear infections by
interfering with normal drainage from eustachian tubes?
a. nasal chamber
b. nasal conchae
c. epiglottis
D. adenoids
D adenoids
The conjuctivae
A. have no resident bacteria.
b. are often covered with bacteria.
c. are populated with S. aureus.
d. are populated with S. pyogenes.
A. have no resident bacteria.
The eyes are protected from infection by
a. the washing action of the tears and eyelids.
b. the chemical action of lysozyme.
c. the use of contact lenses.
d. the dryness of the eye surface.
E. the washing action of the tears and eyelids AND the chemical action of lysozyme.
E. the washing action of the tears and eyelids AND the chemical action of lysozyme.
The cause of strep throat is
a. Staphylococcus aureus
B. Streptococcus pyogenes- beta-hemolytic, group A
c. Staphylococcus pyogenes- alpha-hemolytic, group B
d. Streptococcus pneumoniae
B. Streptococcus pyogenes- beta-hemolytic, group A
Which of the following is associated with the upper respiratory system?
a. humidifying inhaled air
b. warming inhaled air
c. cooling inhaled air
d. drying inhaled air
E. humidifying inhaled air AND warming inhaled air
E humidifying inhaled air AND warming inhaled air
Rapid diagnostic tests for streptococcal infections may utilize
a. blood agar.
b. antibodies.
c. DNA probes.
d. the Kirby-Bauer test.
E. antibodies AND DNA probes.
E. antibodies AND DNA probes.
Virulence factors used by S. pyogenes may be
a. Protein F.
b. M Protein.
c. a capsule.
d. Protein G.
E. All of the choices are correct.
E. All of the choices are correct.
The disease characterized by the appearance of a toxin-mediated rash and a whitish
coating on the tongue is
a. measles.
b. chickenpox.
c. strep throat.
D. scarlet fever.
D. scarlet fever.
A bacteriophage is necessary for toxin production in
a. E. coli.
b. Staphylococcusaureus.
c. Streptococcus pyogenes.
D. C. diphtheriae.
D. C. diphtheriae.
Diphtheria toxin works on
a. lysosomes.
b. mitochondria.
c. chloroplasts.
D. elongation factor 2.
D. elongation factor 2.
Which is used in the vaccination for C. diphtheriae?
a. protein A
b. M protein
C. toxoid
d. red blood cells
C. toxoid
The most common bacterial pathogen(s) involved with sinusitis, otitis media and
conjunctivitis is/are
a. S. aureus
b. H. influenzae
c. S. pneumoniae
d. S. epidermidis
E. H. influenzae AND S. pneumoniae
E. H. influenzae AND S. pneumoniae
Otitis media and sinusitis are usually preceded by a(n)
a. middle ear infection.
b. pseudomonal infection.
c. oropharyngeal infection.
D. nasopharyngeal infection.
D. nasopharyngeal infection.
Otitis media probably develops from an infection that spread
a. from the outer ear to the middle ear.
b. from the sensory neurons of the middle ear.
c. through the tympanic membrane.
D. upward through the eustachian tube.
D. upward through the eustachian tube.
Most colds are probably caused by
A. rhinovirus.
b. S. aureus.
c. Pseudomonas sp.
d. E. coli.
A. rhinovirus.
Rhinoviruses need to be grown
a. in living cells.
b. in synthetic media.
c. on blood agar.
d. at 33°C.
E. in living cells AND at 33°C.
E. in living cells AND at 33°C.
The rhinovirus contains
a. single-stranded RNA.
B. double-stranded RNA.
c. double-stranded DNA.
d. multiple pieces of single-stranded DNA.
B. double-stranded RNA.
The reservoir of the common cold is the
a. family pet.
B. human.
c. infected fomite.
d. fruit.
B. human.
The passage from the mouth to the anus is termed the
a. gut canal.
b. oral cavity.
c. grand canal.
D. alimentary canal.
D. alimentary canal.
Collections of bacteria that adhere to the surfaces of the teeth are called
a. dental caries.
B. dental plaque.
c. halitosis.
d. periodontal disease.
B. dental plaque.
The most common infectious disease of humans is
a. the common cold.
B. dental caries.
c. hepatitis A.
d. halitosis
B. dental caries.
The principal cause of dental caries is
A. S. mutans.
b. S. salivarius.
c. S. mitis.
d. S. sanguis.
A. S. mutans.
Part of the ability of S. mutans to produce dental caries depends on its ability to
a. invade plaque and dissolve the gums.
B. convert sucrose to lactic acid.
c. convert proteins to sugars.
d. attach to the gums.
B. convert sucrose to lactic acid.
This mineral, typically added to drinking water, makes enamel more resistant to
dissolving in acid.
a. calcium
b. chlorine
c. chloramine
D. fluoride
D. fluoride
The chronic inflammatory process involving the gums and tissues around the teeth is
called
a. dental caries.
B. periodontal disease.
c. dental plaque.
d. root caries.
B. periodontal disease.
H. pylori is, in part, able to survive in the stomach by its ability to produce
a. lactic acid from sugar.
b. fatty acids from sebum.
c. neutralizing proteins from glucans.
D. ammonia from urea.
D. ammonia from urea.
H. pylori appears to have some connection with
a. acid reflux disease.
b. ulcers.
c. dental caries.
d. stomach cancer.
E. ulcers AND stomach cancer.
E. ulcers AND stomach cancer.
Where in the body does the latent, non-infectious, non-replicating form of the herpes
simplex virus persist?
a. motor neurons
b. red blood cells
c. cranial nerves
D. sensory nerves
D. sensory nerves
A painful finger infection attributable to herpes virus is known as a(n)
a. finger sore.
b. abrasion lesion.
c. furuncle.
D. herpetic whitlow.
D. herpetic whitlow.
Which of the following has shown some effectiveness in treating a herpes infection?
a. AZT
b. protease inhibitors
C. acyclovir
d. cephalosporin
C. acyclovir
The viral disease that characteristically infects the parotid glands is
a. measles.
b. herpes.
c. chickenpox.
D. mumps.
D. mumps.
Mumps is a good candidate for elimination from the population due to
a. the existence of an effective vaccine.
b. a human only reservoir.
c. the absence of a latent state.
d. a single serotype.
E. All of the choices are correct.
E. All of the choices are correct.
Almost all bacterial intestinal infections may be attributed to
a. Vibrio spp.
b. C. jejuni.
c. Salmonella spp.
d. enterobacteria.
E. All of the choices are correct.
E. All of the choices are correct.
The initial attachment required for establishment of an intestinal infection is by
a. flagella.
b. cilia.
c. pseudopodia.
D. pili
D. pili
The toxins involved in intestinal infections typically
a. kill cells by inhibiting protein synthesis.
b. modify cell physiology resulting in increased secretion of water and electrolytes.
c. modify cell physiology resulting in decreased secretion of water and electrolytes.
d. kill cells by inhibiting DNA synthesis.
E. kill cells by inhibiting protein synthesis AND modify cell physiology resulting in
increased secretion of water and electrolytes.
E. kill cells by inhibiting protein synthesis AND modify cell physiology resulting in
increased secretion of water and electrolytes
Cholera is the classic example of a(n)
a. food-borne illness.
b. zoonosis.
c. opportunist.
D. very severe form of diarrhea.
D. very severe form of diarrhea.
The diarrhea of cholera has been described as
a. a viscous fluid.
b. small in volume.
c. somewhat watery.
D. a rice water stool.
D. a rice water stool.
The symptoms of cholera are due to the action of
a. an endotoxin.
b. modified mucus.
c. flagella.
D. an exotoxin.
D. an exotoxin.
A common source of cholera infection is
a. acid rain.
b. unpasteurized milk.
C. fecal contaminated material, especially water.
d. boiled water.
e. acid rain AND boiled water.
C. fecal contaminated material, especially water.
The primary treatment for cholera is
a. the administration of antibiotics.
b. vaccination.
c. by blood transfusion.
D. simply rehydration.
e. vaccination AND by blood transfucion.
D. simply rehydration.