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75 Cards in this Set

  • Front
  • Back
moira
individual fate
hamartia
tragic flaw
hubris
self pride which creates suffering
catharsis
emotional purgation felt by the audience of a tragedy
lex talionis
law of the talon; eye for an eye
logos
the word; power of argument and logic
anagnoresis
moment of recognition in a tragedy- ignorance to knowledge
oikos
household; center of family
ob skena
off stage; too violent to show on stage
peripeteia
moment of reversal in a tragedy
allegory
using character/story elements to symbolically represent and abstraction in adition to literal meaning
alliteration
repetition of initial cononant sounds in 2 or more neighboring words
allusion
direct or indirect reference to something supposedly commonly known
ambiguity
multiple meanings, either intentional or unintentional, of a word, phrase, sentence, or passage
analogy
similarity or comparison between 2 different things witha relationship between them.
aphorism
terse statement of known authorship which expresses a general truth or moral principle
apostrophe
directly addressing an absent or imaginary person or a personified abstraction
atmosphere
emotional mood created by the entirety of a literary work, est. by setting and choice of objects described
coloquial
use of slang or informalities in speech or writing, conversational tone, local or regional dialects
conceit
fanciful expression, extended metaphor or surprising analogy between seemingly dissimilar objects
connotation
nonliteral, associative meaning of a word
denotation
strict, literal, dictionary definition of a word, devoid of any emotion, attitude or color
diction
related to style, writer's word choices
didactic
teaching, works that aim to teach or instruct, moral or ethical principles
euphemism
good speech, less offensive substitutes
extended metaphor
metaphor developed at great lenth, occuring frequently in or throughout a work
figurative language
writing or speech not intended to carry literal meaning and is usually meant to be imaginative and vivid
figure of speech
device used to produce figurative language
genre
major category in which a literary work fits: prose, poetry and drama; fiction or nonfiction
homily
sermon, any serious talk, speech or lecture involving moral or spiritual advice
hyperbole
deliberate exaggeration or overstatement, comic effect
imagery
sensory details or fig. language used to descibe, arouse emotion, or represent abstraction
inference
to draw a reasonable concludion from information presented
invective
emotionally violent, verbal denunciation or attack using strong, abusive language
irony
contrast between what is stated explicitly and what is really meant: verbal, situational, and dramatic
metaphor
using implied comparison of seemingly unlike things without using like or as
metonomy
"changed label" or "substitute name" one object substituted for something closely related
mood
prevailing atmosphere or emotional aura of a work
narrative
telling of a story or an account of an event or series of events
onomatorpoeia
natural sounds are imitated in the sounds of words
oxymoron
"pointedly foolish", apparently contradictory terms grouped to suggest a paradox
paradox
statement that appears to be self-contradictory, but upon closer inspection contains some degree of truth
parallelism
framing of words, phrases, sentences or paragraphs to give structural similarity
parody
work that closely imitates the style or content of another with the specific aim of comic effect and ridicule
personification
author presents or describes concepts, animals, or inanimate objects by endowing them with human characteristics
point of view
persprective from which story is told
prose
one major divisions of genre- fiction or nonfiction, written in ordinary language and most closely resemble everyday speech- not poetry or drama
repetition
duplication, either exact or approcimate of any element of language
sarcasm
bitter, caustic language that is meant to hurt or ridicule someone or something
satire
work that targets human vices and follies or social insititution or conventions for reform or ridicule
style
sum of choices an author make in blending diction, syntax, fig language, and other
syllogism
deductive system of formal logic that presents two premise: major and minor
symbol
anything that represents or stands forsomething else
syntax
the way an author chooses to join words into phrases, clauses, and sentences
theme
central idea or message of a work, the insight it offers into life
tone
similar to mood, describes author's attitude toward his or her material
transition
word or phrase that links different ideas.
understatement
ironic minimalizing of fact, presents something as less significant than it is. humorous and emphatic
attitude
writer's intellectual position or emotion regarding the subject of writing
soliloquoy
speech in which the character speaks his thoughts alone
rhetorical question
question asked for effect, not asking for reply
stereotype
conventional pattern, expression, character or idea
blank verse
unrhymed iambic pentameter
end-stopped
line with a pause at the end, lines that end with a period, comma, colon, semicolon, exclamation point or question mark
free verse
poetry not written in traditional meter but is still rhythmical
heroic couplet
2 end-stopped iambic pentameter lines, rhymed with the thought usually completed in the 2 line unit
hexameter
line containing six feet
iamb
2 syllable foot, unaccented syllable followed by an accented syllable, most common foot
internal rhyme
rhyme occurs within a line rather than the end
pentameter
line containing five feet
rhyme royal
seven-line stanza of iambic pentameter rhymed ababbcc
sonnet
14 line iambic pentameter poem
stanza
usually a repeated grouping of three or more lines with the same meter and rhyme scheme
terza rima
three line stanza rhymed aba, bcb, cdc
tetrameter
line of four feet