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42 Cards in this Set

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Affect

Feelings,emotions, and moods that a learner bringsto bear ona task.

Motivation

Innerstate that energizes, directs, and sustains behavior.

Academicengagement

Extentof behavioral, cognitive, and emotional involvement in an academic activity.


√ Behavioralengagement


√ Cognitiveengagement


√ Emotionalengagement

Situatedmotivation

Motivationthat emerges at least partly from conditions in a Learner’s immediateenvironment.

Needfor arousal

Ongoingneed for either physical or cognitive stimulation.

Needfor competence

Beliefabout the extent to which one is generally a good, capable individual.

Self-worth


Beliefabout the extent to which one is generally a good, capable individual.

Needfor autonomy

Basicneed to believe chat one has some control regarding the course of one's life.

Needfor relatedness


Basic need to feel socially connected toothers and to secure others' love and respect.

Extrinsicmotivation

Motivationresulting from factors external to the individual and unrelated to the taskbeing performed.

Intrinsicmotivation

Motivationresulting from personal characteristics or inherent in the task beingperformed.

Flow


Intense form of intrinsic motivation,involving complete absorption in and concentration on a challenging activity.

Interest

Perception that anactivity is intriguing and enjoyable; typically accompanied by both cognitiveengagement and positive affect.

Situatedinterest

Interestevoked temporarily by something in the environment.

Personalinterest

Long-term,relatively stable interest in a particular topic or activity.

Self-efficacy

Beliefthat one is capable of executing specific behaviors or reaching specific goals.

Collectiveself-efficacy

Sharedbelief of members of a group that they can be successful when they worktogether on a task.

Resilientself-efficacy

Beliefthat one can perform a task successfully even after experiencing set backs.

Self-handicapping

Behaviorthat undermines one's own success as a way of protecting self-worth duringpotentially difficult tasks.

Value

Beliefthat an activity has direct or indirect benefits.

Internalizedmotivation

Motivationresulting from personal characteristics or inherent in the task beingperformed.

Mastergoal

Desireto develop compc1cncc by acquiring new knowledge or mastering new skills.

Performancegoal

Desireto demonstrate competence and make a good impression.

Performance-approachgoal

Desireto look good and receive favorable judgments from others.

Performance-avoidancegoal

Desirenot to look bad or receive unfavorable judgments from others.

Socialgoals

Desirerelated 10 establishing or maintaining relationships with other people.

Coregoals

Long-termgoal that drives much of what a learner does.

Attributions

Self-constructedcausal explanation for a personally experienced or observed event, such asone's own or another person's success or failure.




√ Locus("place"): Internal versus external.


√ Stability:Stable versus unstable.


√ Controllability:Controllable versus uncontrollable.

Incrementalview of intelligence

Beliefthat intelligence can improve with effort and practice.

Entityview of intelligence

Beliefthat intelligence is a distinct ability that is relatively permanent andunchangeable.


√ Emotionalreactions to success and failure.√ Expectationsfor future success or failure.


√ Effortand persistence.


√ Learningstrategies.

Self-fulfillingprophecies

Expectationfor an outcome that either directly or indirectly leads to the expected result.

Masteryorientation

General,fairly pervasive belief that one is capable of accomplishing challenging tasks.

Learnedhelplessness

General,fairly pervasive belief that one is incapable of accomplishing tasks and haslittle or no control over the environment.

Self-consciousemotion

Affectivestate based on self-evaluations regarding the extent to which one's actionsmeet society's standards for appropriate and desirable behavior; examples arepride, guilt, and shame.

Hotcognition

Learningor cognitive processing that is emotionally charged.

Cognitivedissonance

Feeling of mental discomfort caused by newinformation that conflicts with current knowledge or beliefs.

Anxiety

Feelingof uneasiness and apprehension concerning a situation with an uncertainoutcome.

Facilitatinganxiety

Levelof anxiety (usually relatively low) that enhances performance.

Debilitatinganxiety

Anxietyof sufficient intensity that it interferes with performance.

Stereotypethreat

Awarenessof a negative stereotype about one's own group and accompanying uneasiness tha1low performance will confirm the stereotype; leads (often unintentionally) to areduction in performance.

Proximalgoals

Concretegoal that can be accomplished within a short lime period; may be astepping-stone toward a longer-term goal.

Emotionalregulations

Processof keeping one's affective states and affect-related behaviors withinproductive, culturally desirable limits