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59 Cards in this Set

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Confederation

A group of individuals who band together for a common purpose

Limited Government

The principle that the powers and functions of the government are restricted by the US Constitution and other laws

Reserved Powers

Powers that the Constitution neither gives to congress not denies to the states

Supremacy Clause

States that the Constitution, federal laws made to pursuant its authority, constitutes the supreme law of the land

Popular Sovereignty

The idea that the majority vote of the people get the say on what the government does


LIKE A DEMOCRACY

3/5 Compromise

Stated that 3 our if 5 slaves would count towards the population total (to determine how many representatives the house would have)

Checks and Balances

A system where each branch of government is able to limit the power of other branches


IS NOT THE SAME THING AS SEPARATION OF POWERS

Bicameral

Two house legislature

Federalism

The principle of having shared powers between the national and state governments


National has supremacy over state

Bicameral

Two house legislature

Federalism

The principle of having shared powers between the national and state governments


National has supremacy over state

Judicial Review

The power of the Supreme Court of the US to review actions taken by other branches and to decide if the actions are legal under the constitution

Bicameral

Two house legislature

Federalism

The principle of having shared powers between the national and state governments


National has supremacy over state

Judicial Review

The power of the Supreme Court of the US to review actions taken by other branches and to decide if the actions are legal under the constitution

Preamble

The introduction to the Constitution

Bicameral

Two house legislature

Federalism

The principle of having shared powers between the national and state governments


National has supremacy over state

Judicial Review

The power of the Supreme Court of the US to review actions taken by other branches and to decide if the actions are legal under the constitution

Preamble

The introduction to the Constitution

Concurrent Powers

Powers shared by state and the federal government

Bicameral

Two house legislature

Federalism

The principle of having shared powers between the national and state governments


National has supremacy over state

Judicial Review

The power of the Supreme Court of the US to review actions taken by other branches and to decide if the actions are legal under the constitution

Preamble

The introduction to the Constitution

Concurrent Powers

Powers shared by state and the federal government

Separation of Powers

Division of the governments powers among the executive, legislative and judicial branches.


NOT THE SAME THING AS CHECKS AND BALANCES

Bicameral

Two house legislature

Federalism

The principle of having shared powers between the national and state governments


National has supremacy over state

Judicial Review

The power of the Supreme Court of the US to review actions taken by other branches and to decide if the actions are legal under the constitution

Preamble

The introduction to the Constitution

Concurrent Powers

Powers shared by state and the federal government

Separation of Powers

Division of the governments powers among the executive, legislative and judicial branches.


NOT THE SAME THING AS CHECKS AND BALANCES

Federalist Papers

Collection of essays written by Alexander Hamilton (and others) about the topic of federalism in the United States


Argued that the nation would not survive without a strong central government

What happened at the Second Continental Congress

They decided to make themselves 13 separate countries (states) instead of one large country

Who wrote the Declaration of Independence?

Thomas Jefferson

What were the ideas behind the Declaration of Independence?

•all people are equal


•people have certain natural rights

How many countries were created due to the Declaration of Independence?

13 countries

How did the states immediately confirmed their independence?

By writing their own (state) constitution

Why did the states create the Articles of Confederation

They needed a form of government to govern them, but they couldn’t have too much power

What were the characteristics of the Articles of Confederation?

•one house legislature (each state has a vote)


•congress had few limited powers (powers to control the army & deal with foreign invaders)

Why were the Articles of Confederation so weak?

Due to bad experiences with the British Government


(No power to tax & no power to force laws)

What was the significance of Shays Rebellion?

Made it clear that we needed a stronger government

Where was the Constitutional Convention held?

Philadelphia, PA

Why did the delegates gather at the Constitutional Convention?

To revise the Articles of Confederation, ended up writing a whole new document

What were the characteristics of the Virginia Plan?

Designed by James Maddison


Included President, courts, congress, representation based on population


NOT GOOD FOR SMALL STATES

What were the characteristics of the New Jersey Plan?

Equal representation


NOT GOOD FOR BIG STATES

What was the Great Compromise?

AKA as the Constitutional Compromise


Connecticut delegates suggest a way to satisfy both sides by proposing that the new congress would have two houses (a mix of both plans)

What was the Great Compromise?

AKA as the Constitutional Compromise


Connecticut delegates suggest a way to satisfy both sides by proposing that the new congress would have two houses (a mix of both plans)

Why was the Great Compromise so important?

It created the congress we use today

What was the Electoral College

Each legislature chooses an elector

What was the ratification process for the Constitution?

9 out of 13 states had to approve for it to be ratified

Who was the last state to ratify the constitution?

Rhode Island

What were the views of the Anti-Federalists?

They opposed the Constitution. Thought too much power was being taken away from the states and being given to the national government

What were the views of the Federalists?

Supported the ratification of the Constitution. Believed that the nation wouldn’t survive without a (semi) strong national government. Pointed out that the Articles proved their point

What were the purposes of the Constitution?

Provided a framework for the US government and had legal & political force

What were the goals of the Constitution?

•to form a more perfect union


•to establish justice


•to ensure domestic tranquility


•to provide for the common defense


•to promote the general welfare


•to secure the the blessing of liberty to ourselves and our prosperity

What are the 6 principle that the founding fathers strongly believed in?

1. Popular Sovereignty


2. Limited Government


3. Federalism


4. Separation of Powers


5. Checks and Balances


6. Judicial Review

What were the differences between the Federal System and the Confederal System?

Federal System divides Powers over people and territory between a national government and regional levels of government


Confederal System each state joins together to form a central government. The states each have limited powers