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30 Cards in this Set

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1. The Great Ice Age accounted for the origins of North America’s human history because...
a. it exposed the land bridge connecting Eurasia with North America.
b. the glacial withdrawal allowed migration from South America.
c. the glacial withdrawal formed freshwater lakes that supported life.
d. when it ended European migration to the west became possible.
e. it prevented the migration of dangerous animals from the Bering isthmus.
a. it exposed the land bridge connecting Eurasia with North America.
2. Most likely the first Americans were...
a. Viking from Scandinavia.
b. Spanish explorers of the 15th century.
c. people who crossed the land bridge from Eurasia to North America.
d. Portuguese sailors of Prince Henry the Navigator.
e. refugees from Africa.
c. people who crossed the land bridge from Eurasia to North America.
3. Some of the more advanced Native American cultures did all of the following except...
a. engage in significant ocean voyages of discovery.
b. establish large bustling cities.
c. make strikingly accurate astronomical observations.
d. study mathematics.
e. carry on commerce.
a. engage in significant ocean voyages of discovery.
4. The size and sophistication of Native American civilization in Mexico and South America can be attributed to...
a. Spanish influences.
b. their way of life based on hunting and gathering.
c. the development of agriculture.
d. influences brought by early settlers from Siberia.
e. their use of draft animals and the wheel.
c. the development of agriculture.
5. One of the main factors that enable Europeans to conquer native North Americans with relative ease was...
a. the pacifists nature of North Americans.
b. the settled agriculture societies of North America.
c. the absence of dense concentrations of population or complex nation-states in North America.
d. the use of native guides.
e. all of the above.
a. the pacifists nature of North Americans.
6. The Iroquois Confederacy was able to menace its Native American and European neighbors because of...
a. its military alliance, sustained by political and organizational skills.
b. the Iroquois skill with Europeans’ muskets.
c. the scattered nature of the Iroquois settlements, making it difficult for their enemies to defeat them.
d. the alliance with the Aztec and the Incas.
e. its use of new weapons.
e. its use of new weapons.
7. After his 1st voyage, Christopher Columbus believed that he had
a. discovered a New World.
b. failed at what he had set out to do.
c. sailed the outskirts of the East Indies.
d. sailed around the world.
e. reached the shores of Japan.
d. sailed around the world.
8. In the new interdependent global economic system that emerged after Columbus’s discovery, the new world provided
a. markets
b. technology
c. raw materials.
d. capital.
e. labor.
c. raw materials.
9. The introduction of American plants around the world resulted in
a. rapid population growth in Europe.
b. many illnesses, caused by the new germs contained in these food-stuffs.
c. an African population decline.
d. very little change.
e. an increase in obese people.
d. very little change.
10. European contact with Native Americans led to
a. the Europeans’ acceptance of the horse into their culture.
b. the deaths of millions of Native Americans, who had little resistance to European diseases.
c. the introduction into the new World of such plants as potatoes, tomatoes, and beans.
d. an increase in the Native American population.
e. the use of tobacco by Native Americans.
b. the deaths of millions of Native Americans, who had little resistance to European diseases.
11. European explorers introduced _________________ into the New World.
a. syphilis
b. maize
c. tobacco
d. smallpox
e. pumpkin
d. smallpox
12. Men became conquistadores because they wanted to
a. gain God’s favor by spreading Christianity.
b. escape dubious pasts.
c. seek adventure, as the heroes of classical antiquity had done.
d. satisfy their desire for gold
e. all of the above.
e. all of the above.
13. The Aztec chief Montezuma allowed Cortes to enter the capital of Tenochtitlan because
a. Cortés’s army was so powerful.
b. Montezuma believed that Cortes was the god Quetzalcoatl.
c. there was little in the city of interest to the Spanish.
d. he was told to by the gods.
e. all of the above.
b. Montezuma believed that Cortes was the god Quetzalcoatl.
Cortes came from the east
14. Spain began to fortify and settle its North American border lands in order to
a. protect its Central and South American domains from encroachments by England and France.
b. gain control of Canada.
c. gain more slaves.
d. find a passage to the Pacific Ocean.
e. look for gold in Florida.
e. look for gold in Florida.
15. England’s defeat of the Spanish Armada
a. led to a Franco-Spanish alliance that prevented England from establishing its own American colonies.
b. allowed England to take control of Spain’s American colonies.
c. demonstrated that Spanish Catholicism was inferior to English Protestantism.
d. helped to ensure England’s naval dominance in the North Atlantic.
e. occurred despite weather conditions which favored Spain.
d. helped to ensure England’s naval dominance in the North Atlantic.
16. On the eve of its colonizing adventure, England possessed
a. a unified national state.
b. a measure of religious unity.
c. a sense of nationalism.
d. a popular monarch.
e. all of the above.
e. all of the above.
17. All of the following provided motives for England colonizing except
a. unemployment.
b. thirst for adventure.
c. desire for markets.
d. desire for religious freedom.
e. need for a place to exploit slave labor.
e. need for a place to exploit slave labor.
18. The early years at Jamestown were mainly characterized by
a. starvation, disease, and frequent Indian raids.
b. economic prosperity.
c. constant fear of Spanish invasion.
d. major technological advancement.
e. peace with the Native Americans.
a. starvation, disease, and frequent Indian raids.
19. Despite an abundance of fish and game, early Jamestown settlers continued to starve because
a. they had neither weapons nor fishing gear.
b. their fear of Indians prevented them from venturing too far from the town.
c. they wasted time looking for gold.
d. they lacked leaders to organize efficient hunting and fishing parties.
e. there were not enough gentlemen to organize the work force.
a. they had neither weapons nor fishing gear.
20. Captain John Smith’s role at Jamestown can best be described as
a. very limited.
b. saving the colony from collapse.
c. persuading the colonists to continue their hunt for gold.
d. worsening the colonists’ relationship with the Indians.
e. reducing the terrible death toll.
b. saving the colony from collapse.
21. The biggest disruptor of Native American life was
a. horses.
b. loss of culture.
c. disease.
d. fire arms.
e. the formation of new tribes.
c. disease.
22. After the purchases of slaves in 1619 by Jamestown settlers, additional purchases of Africans were few because
a. they were poor workers.
b. many colonists were morally opposed to slavery.
c. their labor was not needed.
d. indentured servants refused to work with them.
e. they were too costly.
e. they were too costly.
23. The cultivation of tobacco in Jamestown resulted in all of the following except
a. the destruction of the soil.
b. a great demand for controlled labor.
c. soaring prosperity in the colony.
d. diversification of the colony’s economy.
e. the broad-arced plantation system.
d. diversification of the colony’s economy.
24. A major reason for the founding of the Maryland colony was to
a. establish a defensive buffer against Spanish colonies in the South.
b. create a refuge for the Catholics.
c. help the Protestants.
d. allow Lord Baltimore to keep all the land for himself.
e. repudiate the feudal way of life.
b. create a refuge for the Catholics.
25. Maryland’s Act of Toleration
a. was issued by Lord Baltimore.
b. abolished the death penalty.
c. gave freedom only to Catholics.
d. protected Jews and atheists.
e. actually sanctioned less religious toleration than what previously existed.
e. actually sanctioned less religious toleration than what previously existed.
26. Some Africans became especially valuable as slaves in the Carolinas because they
a. had experience working in dry, desert like areas.
b. were experienced in rice cultivation.
c. were knowledgeable regarding cotton production.
d. exhibited skill as soldiers.
e. were skilled fishermen.
a. had experience working in dry, desert like areas.
27. The attitude of Carolinians toward Indians can best be described as
a. friendly.
b. neutral.
c. hostile.
d. promoting interracial marriage.
e. none of the above.
c. hostile.
28. By 1750, all the southern plantation colonies
a. based their economies on the production of staple crops for export.
b. practiced slavery.
c. provided tax support for the Church of England.
d. had few large cities.
e. all of the above.
e. all of the above.
29. Virginia, Maryland, the Carolinas and Georgia were similar in that they were all
a. economically dependent on the export of a staple crop.
b. proprietary colonies.
c. founded after the restoration of Charles II to the throne.
d. founded as refuges for persecuted religious sects in England.
e. able to live in peace with Native Americas.
a. economically dependent on the export of a staple crop.
30. All of the following European imports threatened the Iroquois’ existence except
a. religion.
b. whiskey.
c. diseases.
d. muskets.
e. all threatened their existence.
e. all threatened their existence.