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50 Cards in this Set

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Animism

The belief that the forces of nature are inhabited by spirits.

Clan

A group that traces its descent from a common ancestor.

Culture

The sum total of those things (including traditions, techniques, material goods and symbol systems) that people have invented, developed and transmitted.

Cuneiform

"wedgw-shaped" One of human kind's earliest writing systems, consisting of wedge-shaped marks impressed into clay by means of a reed stylus.

Dolmen

A stone tomb formed by two posts capped by a lintel.

Hieroglyph

"sacred sign" in Greek. the pictograph script of Ancient Egypt.

Hominid

Any of a family of bipedal primate mammals, including modern humans and their ancestors, the earliest which was Austalopithecus

Ideogram

A sign that represents an idea or thing.

Lost Wax

(Cire-Perdu in French) A method of metal casting in which a figure is modeled in wax, then enclosed in a clay mold that is fired; the wax melts , the molten metal is poured in to replace it; finally, the clay mold is removed and the solid metal form is polished.

Megalith

a large, roughly shaped stone, often used in ancient architectual construction.

Phonogram

a sign that represents a sound.

Pictograph

A pictoral system used in humankind's earliest systems of writing.

Polychrome

Having many or various colors.

Post and Lintel

The simplest form of architectural construction, consisting of vertical members (posts) and supporting horizontals (lintels).

Prehistory

The study of history before written records.

Shaman

A priestly leader or healer who meditates between the natural and the spiritual world.

Stele

An upright stone slab or pillar.

Antiphonal

A type of music which two or more groups of voices or instruments alternate with one another.

Cantor

The chief singer of the liturgy.

Covenant

Contract; the bond between the Hebrew people and their god.

Empire

The state achieved militarily by the unification or territories under a single sovereign power.

Epic

A long narrative poem that recounts the deeds of a legendary or historical hero in his quest for meaning or identity.

Lapis Lazuli

A semiprecious blue stone.

Liturgy

The rituals for a public worship.

Menorah

a seven-branched candelabrum.

Monarch

A single or sole ruler.

Monotheism

the belief in one and only one god.

Mosaic

A medium by which small pieces of glass or stone are used to ornamate a flat surface.

Polytheism

The belief in many gods.

Prophet

Greek: "One who speaks for another. a divinely inspired teacher.

Responsory

A type of music in which a single voice answers another voice or chorus.

Shofar

A trumpet made of a ram's horn, used to summon Jews to prayer.

Synagogue

The Jewish house for worship and religious study.

Theocracy

Rule, by god or god's representative.

Torah

"instruction" "law" or "teaching" The first five books of the Hebrew bible: Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers and Deuteronomy.

Ziggurat

A terraced tower of rubble and brick that served ancient Mesopotamians as a temple-shrine.

Cosmology

The theory of the origins, evolution, and structure of the universe.

Dynasty

a sequence of rulers from the same family.

Canon

A set of rules or standards used to establish proportions.

Fresco Secco

"fresh" or "dry" in Italian. A method of painting on walls or ceilings surfaced with moist lime plaster.

Hypostyle

A hall whose roof is supported by columns.

Lyre

Any one of a group of plucked stringed instruments; usually made of tortoise shell or horn and therefore light in weight.

Lyric

Literally "accompanied by the lyre," hence, verse that is meant to be sung rather than spoken; usually characterized by individual or personal emotion.

Mastaba

Early rectangular Egyptian tomb with sloping sides and a flat roof.

Module

A unit of measurement used to determine proportion.

Obelisk

A tall, four sided pillar that tapers to a pyramidal apex.

Papyrus

A reedlike plant from which the ancient Egyptians made paper.

Pylon

A massive gateway in the form of a pair of trundicated pyramids.

Pyramid

A four sided structure rising to a peak.

Relief

A sculptural technique in which figures or forms are carved either to project from the background suface (raised relief) or cut away from below the background level (sunk relief); the degree of relief is designated as high, low, or sunken.