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230 Cards in this Set

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Enteral routes of administration

-Per rectum (PR)


-Ingestion (oral)




Ch. 7, pg. 223

Parenteral routes of administration

-Intravenous (IV)


-Intraosseous (IO)


-Subcutaneous (SC)


-Inhalation


-Sublingual (SL)


-Transcutaneous




Ch. 7, pg. 223

Per Rectum (PR) rate of absorption

Rapid




Ch. 7, pg. 223

Ingestion (oral) rate of absorption

Slow




Ch. 7, pg. 223

Intravenous (IV) rate of absorption

Immediate




Ch. 7, pg. 223

Intraosseous (IO) rate of absorption

Immediate




Ch. 7, pg. 223

Subcutaneous (SC) rate of absorption

Slow




Ch. 7, pg. 223

Intramuscular (IM) rate of absorption

Moderate




Ch. 7, pg. 223

Inhalation rate of absorption

Rapid




Ch. 7, pg. 223

Sublingual (SL) rate of absorption

Rapid




Ch. 7, pg. 223

Transcutaneous rate of absorption

Slow




Ch. 7, pg. 223

The "Six Rights" of Medication Administration

-Right Patient


-Right Medication


-Right Dose


-Right Route


-Right Time


-Right Documentation




Ch. 7, pg. 227

"When administering or assisting with the administration of patient medications, the EMT must have ___________________ to do so."

an order from medical control




Ch. 7, pg. 227

"The circumstances [for when an EMT is allowed to administer a medication] are:

-peer-assisted medication


-patient-assisted medication


-EMT-administered medication




Ch. 7, pg. 229

"In peer-assisted medication administration, you are administering medication to _____________________."

Yourself or your partner




Ch. 7, pg. 229

"In patient-assisted medication administration, you are _________________________."

Assisting the patient with the administration of his or her own medication."




Ch. 7, pg. 229

"[In EMT-administered medication], ____________________________."

The EMT is directly administering the medication to the patient.




Ch.7, pg. 229

Common trade name(s) for acetaminophen

Tylenol




Ch. 7, pg. 230

Common trade name(s) for activated charcoal

Actidose with Sorbitol




Ch. 7, pg. 230

Common trade name(s) for Aspirin

Bayer




Ch. 7, pg. 230

Common trade name(s) for Albuterol

-Proventil


-Ventolin




Ch. 7, pg. 230

Common trade name(s) for Diphenhydramine

Benadryl




Ch. 7, pg. 230

Common trade name(s) for Epinephrine

EpiPen




Ch. 7, pg. 231

Common trade name(s) for Ibuprofen

-Advil


-Motrin


-Nuprin




Ch. 7, pg. 231

Common trade name(s) for Nitroglycerin

Nitrostat




Ch. 7, pg. 231

Common trade name(s) for Oral Glucose

Glutose




Ch. 7, pg. 231

Common trade name(s) for Oxygen

None




Ch. 7, pg. 231

Action of Acetaminophen

Analgesic and antifever




Ch. 7, pg. 230

Action of Activated Charcoal

Adsorbs toxic substances in the digestive tract




Ch. 7, pg. 230

Action of Aspirin

Anti-inflammatory agent and anti-fever agent; prevent platelets from clumping, thereby decreasing formation of new clots




Ch. 7, pg. 230

Action of Albuterol

Stimulates nervous system, causing bronchodilation




Ch. 7, pg. 230

Action of Diphenhydramine

Antihistamine (blocks histamine)




Ch. 7, pg. 230

Action of Epinephrine

Stimulates nervous system, causing bronchodilation




Ch. 7, pg. 231

Action of Ibuprofen

Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug that reduces inflammation and fever, analgesic




Ch. 7, pg. 231

Action of Nitroglycerin

Dilates blood vessels




Ch. 7, pg. 231

Action of oral glucose

When absorbed, provides glucose for cell use




Ch. 7, pg. 231

Action of oxygen

Reverses hypoxia, provides oxygen to be absorbed by lungs




Ch. 7, pg. 231

Indications for Acetaminophen

Relief of mild pain or fever, headache, muscle aches




Ch. 7, pg. 230

Indications for Activated Charcoal

Most oral poisonings; overdose




Ch. 7, pg. 230

Indications for Aspirin

Relief of mild pain, headaches; chest pain when considering myocardial infarction




Ch. 7, pg. 230

Indications for albuterol

Asthma/difficulty breathing with wheezing




Ch. 7, pg. 230

Indications for diphenhydramine

Mild allergic reactions




Ch. 7, pg. 230

Indications for epinephrine

Severe allergic reaction




Ch. 7, pg. 231

Indications for Ibuprofen

Mild pain or fever, headache, muscle aches




Ch. 7, pg. 231

Indications for Nitroglycerin

Chest pain due to myocardial infarction or angina.




Ch. 7, pg. 231

Indications for Oral Glucose

Low blood glucose (hypoglycemia)




Ch. 7, pg. 231

Indications for oxygen

Hypoxia or suspected hypoxia




Ch. 7, pg. 231

Contraindications for acetaminophen

Hypersensitivity




Ch. 7, pg. 230

Contraindications for Activated Charcoal

Decreased level of consciousness; overdose of corrosives, caustics, or petroleum substances.




Ch. 7, pg. 230

Contraindications for Aspirin

Hypersensitivity; recent bleeding




Ch. 7, pg. 230

Contraindications for Albuterol

Hypersensitivity, tachycardia, myocardial infarction




Ch. 7, pg. 230

Contraindications for Diphenhydramine

Asthma, glaucoma, pregnancy, hypertension, infants




Ch. 7, pg. 230

Contraindications for Epinephrine

Myocardial infarction, hypothermia, hypertension




Ch. 7, pg. 231

Contraindications for Ibuprofen

Hypersensitivity




Ch. 7, pg. 231

Contraindications for Nitroglycerin

Hypotension, having taken sildenafil (Viagra) or another treatment for erectile dysfunction within the past 24 hour; head injury




Ch. 7, pg. 231

Contraindications for Oral Glucose

Decreased level of consciousness, nausea, vomiting




Ch. 7, pg. 231

Contraindications for Oxygen

Very rarely in patients with COPD. Do not use near open flames as oxygen will support combustion.




Ch. 7, pg. 231

Routes(s) for Acetaminophen

PO




Ch. 7, pg. 230

Routes(s) for Activated Charcoal

PO




Ch. 7, pg. 230

Routes(s) for Aspirin

PO




Ch. 7, pg. 230

Routes(s) for Albuterol

MDI/inhalation




Ch. 7, pg. 230

Routes(s) for Diphenhydramine

PO




Ch. 7, pg. 230

Routes(s) for Epinephrine

IM (auto-injector)




Ch. 7, pg. 231

Routes(s) for ibuprofen

PO




Ch. 7, pg. 231

Routes(s) for Nitroglycerin

SL/spray




Ch. 7, pg. 231

Routes(s) for Oral Glucose

PO




Ch. 7, pg. 231

Routes(s) for Oxygen

Gas/inhalation




Ch. 7, pg. 231

Side Effects of Acetaminophen

Allergic reaction




Ch. 7, pg. 230

Side Effects of Activated Charcoal

Nausea, vomiting, constipation, black stools




Ch. 7, pg. 230

Side Effects of Aspirin

Nausea, vomiting, stomach pain, bleeding, allergic reactions




Ch. 7, pg. 230

Side Effects of Albuterol

Hypertension, tachycardia, anxiety, restlessness




Ch. 7, pg. 230

Side Effects of Diphenhydramine

Sleepiness (although can stimulate children), dry mouth and throat




Ch. 7, pg. 230

Side Effects of Epinephrine

Hypertension, tachycardia, anxiety, restlessness




Ch. 7, pg. 231

Side Effects of Ibuprofen

Nausea, vomiting, stomach pain, bleeding, allergic reactions




Ch. 7, pg. 231

Side effects of Nitroglycerin

Headache, burning under tongue, hypotension, nausea




Ch. 7, pg. 231

Side effects of oral glucose

Nausea, vomiting




Ch. 7, pg. 231

Side effects of oxygen

Decreased respiratory effort in rare cases in patients with COPD




Ch. 7, pg. 231

Interactions of acetaminophen

Caution must be taken when EMT's are administering acetaminophen to avoid potential overdosing. Many OTC medications contain acetaminophen




Ch. 7, pg. 230

Interactions of activated charcoal

Bonds with and inactivates most medications/substances in the digestive tract




Ch. 7, pg. 230

Interactions of aspirin

Caution should be used in patient who are taking anticoagulants




Ch. 7, pg. 230

Interactions of albuterol

Increases effects of other nervous system stimulants




Ch. 7, pg. 230

Interactions of diphenhydramine

Do not take with alcohol or MAO inhibitors (a type of psychiatric medication)




Ch. 7, pg. 230

Interactions of epinephrine

Increases effects of other nervous system stimulants




Ch. 7, pg. 231

Interactions of ibuprofen

Do not take with aspirin




Ch. 7, pg. 231

Interactions of nitroglycerin

Increases dilating effects of other blood-vessel dilating medications




Ch. 7, pg. 231

Interactions of oral glucose

None




Ch. 7, pg. 231

Interactions of oxygen

Can support combustion




Ch. 7, pg. 231

Adult dose of acetaminophen

500 to 1,000 mg every 4 hours as needed; dose is weight-based for children




Ch. 7, pg. 230

Adult dose of activated charcoal

1 to 2 g/kg


Ch. 7, pg. 230

Adult dose of aspirin

160 to 325 mg; 160 to 325 mg chewable tablets for chest pain




Ch. 7, pg. 230

Adult dose of albuterol

1 to 2 inhalations; wait 5 minutes before repeating dose




Ch. 7, pg. 230

Adult dose of diphenhydramine

25 to 50 mg




Ch. 7, pg. 230

Adult dose of epinephrine

1 auto-injector




Ch. 7, pg. 231

Adult dose of ibuprofen

200 to 400 mg every 4 to 6 hours; dose is weight-based in children




Ch. 7, pg. 231

Adult dose of nitroglycerin

0.3 to 0.4 mg; 0.4 mg spray




Ch. 7, pg. 231

Adult dose of oral glucose

1/2 to 1 tube




Ch. 7, pg. 231

Adult dose of oxygen

Use oxygen delivery devices to administer 28% to 100% oxygen




Ch. 7, pg. 231

Administration Concerns for Acetaminophen

Weight of child is more important than age




Ch. 7, pg. 230

Administration Concerns for Activated Charcoal

Stains; protect patient and provider clothing; do not give when giving other PO medications




Ch. 7, pg. 230

Administration Concerns for Aspirin

Do not administer for pain caused by trauma for for fevers in children; patients with chest pain must be able to chew tablets




Ch. 7, pg. 230

Administration Concerns for Albuterol

Patient must inhale all medication in 1 breath; coach patient to hold breath for 5 seconds after inhalation




Ch. 7, pg. 230

Administration Concerns for Diphenhydramine

Can use in severe allergic reaction; however, epinephrine is administered first.




Ch. 7, pg. 230

Administration Concerns for Epinephrine

Medication will last approximately 5 minutes; do not repeat dose; ensure ALS is en route for continuing treatment.




Ch. 7, pg. 231

Administration Concerns for Ibuprofen

Do not take for pain caused by trauma; weight of child is more important than age




Ch. 7, pg. 231

Administration Concerns for Nitroglycerin

Ensure ALS is en route




Ch. 7, pg. 231

Administration Concerns for Oral Glucose

Patient must have control of airway and be awake and able to follow commands




Ch. 7, pg. 231

Administration Concerns for Oxygen

No open flames nearby; do not withhold oxygen from patients in respiratory distress




Ch. 7, pg. 231

T/F: "The bond between medication and charcoal is permanent."

False




Ch. 7, pg. 232

"If the systolic BP is less than ____ mmHg, the nitroglycerin may have the harmful effect of lowering the blood flow to the heart's own blood vessels."

100 mmHg




Ch. 7, pg. 234

"Whether using the tablets or the metered-dose spray [for nitroglycerin], you should wait _____ minutes for a response before repeating the dose."

5




Ch. 7, pg. 235

General Steps in Administering Medication

1. Obtain an order from medical control


2. Verify the proper medication and prescription


3. Verify the form, dose, and route of the medication


4. Check the expiration date and condition of the medication


5. Reassess the vital signs, especially heart rate and blood pressure, at least every 5 minutes or as the patient's condition changes.


6. Document




Ch. 7, pg 235

"When documenting a medication, include ______________, __________, and ____________."

-Name of the medication


-Dose and route


-Vital signs before and after administration




Ch. 7, pg. 236

Generic name of Lipitor

Atorvastatin




Ch. 7, pg . 240

Trade name of Atorvastatin

Lipitor




Ch. 7, pg . 240

Generic name of Singulair

Montelukast




Ch. 7, pg . 240

Trade name of Montelukast

Singulair




Ch. 7, pg . 240

Generic name of Lexapro

Escitalopram




Ch. 7, pg . 240

Trade name of Escitalopram

Lexapro




Ch. 7, pg . 240

Generic name of Nexium

Esomeprazole



Ch. 7, pg . 240


Trade name of Esomeprazole

Nexium




Ch. 7, pg . 240

Generic name of Synthroid

Levothyroxine




Ch. 7, pg . 240

Trade name of Levothyroxine

Synthroid




Ch. 7, pg . 240

Generic name of Plavix

Clopidogrel




Ch. 7, pg . 240

Trade name of Clopidogrel

Plavix




Ch. 7, pg . 240

Generic name of Toprol

Metoprolol




Ch. 7, pg . 240

Trade name of Metoprolol

Toprol



Ch. 7, pg . 240

Generic name of Prevacid

Lansoprazole




Ch. 7, pg . 240

Trade name of Lansoprazole

Prevacid




Ch. 7, pg . 240

Generic name of Vytorin

Ezetimibe and Simvastatin




Ch. 7, pg . 240

Trade name of Ezetimibe and Simvastatin

Vytorin




Ch. 7, pg . 240

Generic name of Advair Diskus

Fluticasone and salmeterol




Ch. 7, pg . 240

Trade name of Fluticasone and Salmeterol

Advair Diskus




Ch. 7, pg . 240

Generic name of Zyrtec

Cetirizine




Ch. 7, pg . 240

Trade name of Cetirizine

Zyrtec




Ch. 7, pg . 240

Generic name of Effexor

Venlafaxine




Ch. 7, pg . 240

Trade name of Venlafaxine

Effexor




Ch. 7, pg . 240

Generic name of Protonix

Pantoprazole




Ch. 7, pg . 240

Trade name of Pantoprazole

Protonix




Ch. 7, pg . 240

Generic name of Diovan

Valsartan




Ch. 7, pg . 240

Trade name of Valsartan

Diovan




Ch. 7, pg . 240

Generic name of Fosamax

Alendronate




Ch. 7, pg . 240

Trade name of Alendronate

Fosamax




Ch. 7, pg . 240

Generic name of Zetia

Ezetimibe




Ch. 7, pg . 240

Trade name of Ezetimibe

Zetia




Ch. 7, pg . 240

Generic name of Crestor

Rosuvastatin




Ch. 7, pg . 240

Trade name of Rosuvastatin

Crestor




Ch. 7, pg . 240

Generic name of Levaquin

Levofloxacin




Ch. 7, pg . 240

Trade name of Levofloxacin

Levaquin




Ch. 7, pg . 240

Generic name of Diovan HCT

Valsartan and hydrochlorothiazide




Ch. 7, pg . 240

Trade name of Valsartan and Hydrochlorothiazide

Diovan HCT




Ch. 7, pg . 240

Generic name of Klor-Con

Potassium chloride




Ch. 7, pg . 240

Trade name of Potassium Chloride

Klor-Con




Ch. 7, pg . 240

Use of Lipitor/atorvastatin

Lowers cholesterol




Ch. 7, pg. 240

Use of singulair/montelukast

Helps prevent asthma attacks




Ch. 7, pg. 240

Use of Lexapro/escitalopram

Depression




Ch. 7, pg. 240

Use of Nexium/esomeprazole

Gastric reflux




Ch. 7, pg. 240

Use of synthroid/levothyroxine

Decreased thyroid functioning




Ch. 7, pg. 240

Use of Plavix/clopidogrel

Prevents stroke and heart attacks




Ch. 7, pg. 240

Use of toprol/metoprolol

Lowers blood pressure




Ch. 7, pg. 240

Use of prevacid/lansoprazole

Stomach ulcers




Ch. 7, pg. 240

Use of Vytorin/ezetimibe and simvastatin

Lowers cholesterol




Ch. 7, pg. 240

Use of Advair Diskus/fluticasone and salmeterol

Asthma




Ch. 7, pg. 240

Use of Zyrtec/cetirizine

Allergies




Ch. 7, pg. 240

Use of Effexor/Venlafaxine

Depression




Ch. 7, pg. 240

Use of protonix/pantoprazole

Gastric Reflux




Ch. 7, pg. 240

Use of diovan/valsartan

High blood pressure




Ch. 7, pg. 240

Use of fosamax/alendronate

Osteoporosis




Ch. 7, pg. 240

Use of zetia/ezetimibe

Lowers cholesterol




Ch. 7, pg. 240

Use of crestor/rosuvastatin

Lowers cholesterol



Ch. 7, pg. 240



Use of levaquin/lexofloxacin

Antibiotic




Ch. 7, pg. 240

Use of Diovan HCT/valsartan and hydrochlorothiazide

Hypertension




Ch. 7, pg. 240

Use of Klor-Con/potassium chloride

Low potassium levels




Ch. 7, pg. 240

Definition: absorption

The process by which medications travel through body tissues until they reach the bloodstream.




Ch. 7, pg. 245

Definition: action

The therapeutic effect of a medication on the body




Ch. 7, pg. 245

Definition: activated charcoal

An oral medication that binds and adsorbs ingested toxins in the gastrointestinal tract for treatment of some poisonings and medication overdoses. Charcoal is ground into a very fine powder that provides the greatest possible surface area for binding medications that have been taken by mouth; it is carried on the EMS unit.




Ch. 7, pg. 245

Definition: adsorption

The process of binding or sticking to a surface.




Ch. 7, pg. 245

Definition: antagonist

A medication that binds to a receptor and blocks other medications




Ch. 7, pg. 245

Definition: aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid or ASA)

A medication that is an antipyretic (reduces fever), analgesic (reduces pain), anti-inflammatory (reduces inflammation), and potent inhibitor of platelet aggregation (clumping)




Ch. 7, pg. 245

Definition: contraindications

Conditions that make a particular medication or treatment inappropriate, for example, a condition in which a medication should not be given because it would not help or may actually harm a patient.




Ch. 7, pg. 245

Definition: dose

The amount of medication given on the basis of the patient's size and age




Ch. 7, pg. 245

Definition: EMT-administered medication

When the EMT directly administers the medication to the patient




Ch. 7, pg. 245

Definition: enteral medications

Medications that enter the body through the digestive system




Ch. 7, pg. 245

Definition: epinephrine

A medication that increases heart rate and blood pressure but also eases breathing problems by decreasing muscle tone of the bronchiole tree; you may be allowed to help the patient self-administer the medication.




Ch. 7, pg. 245

Definition: gel

A semiliquid substance that is administered orally in capsule form or through plastic tubes




Ch. 7, pg. 245

Definition: generic name

The original chemical name of a medication (in contrast with one of its "trade names"); the name is not capitalized.




Ch. 7, pg. 245

Definition: hypoglycemia

An abnormally low blood glucose level.




Ch. 7, pg. 245

Definition: indications

The therapeutic uses for a specific medication




Ch. 7, pg. 245

Definition: inhalation

Breathing into the lungs; a medication delivery route




Ch. 7, pg. 245

Definition: intended effect

The effect that a medication is expected to have on the body




Ch. 7, pg. 245

Definition: intramuscular (IM) injection

An injection into a muscle; a medication delivery route




Ch. 7, pg. 245

Definition: intranasal (IN)

A delivery route in which a medication is pushed through a specialized atomizer device called a mucosal atomizer device (MAD) into the nare.




Ch. 7, pg. 245

Definition: intraosseous (IO)

Into the bone; a medication delivery route




Ch. 7, pg. 245

Definition: intravenous (IV) injection

An injection directly into a vein; a medication delivery route




Ch. 7, pg. 245

Definition: medication

A chemical substance that is used to treat or prevent disease or relieve pain




Ch. 7, pg. 245

Definition: metered-dose inhaler (MDI)

A miniature spray canister through which droplets or particles of medication may be inhaled.




Ch. 7, pg. 245

Definition: mucosal atomizer device (MAD)

A device that is used to change a liquid medication into a spray and pushes it into a nostril.




Ch. 7, pg. 245

Definition: nitroglycerin

A medication that increases cardiac perfusion by causing arteries to dilate; you may be allowed to help the patient self-administer the medication



Ch. 7, pg. 245


Definition: oral

By mouth; a medication delivery route




Ch. 7, pg. 246

Definition: oral glucose

A simple sugar that is readily absorbed by the bloodstream; it is carried on the EMS unit




Ch. 7, pg. 246

Definition: over-the-counter (OTC) medications

Medication that may be purchased directly by a patient without a prescription




Ch. 7, pg. 246

Definition: oxygen

A gas that all cells need for metabolism; the heart and brain, especially, cannot function without oxygen




Ch. 7, pg. 246

Definition: parenteral medications

Medications that enter the body by a route other than the digestive tract, skin, or mucous membranes.




Ch. 7, pg. 246

Definition: patient-assisted medication

When the EMT assists the patient with the administration of his or her own medication




Ch. 7, pg. 246

Definition: peer-assisted medication

When the EMT administers medication to him or herself or to a partner.




Ch. 7, pg. 246

Definition: per os (PO)

Through the mouth; a medication delivery route; same as oral




Ch. 7, pg. 246

Definition: per rectum (PR)

Through the rectum; a medication delivery route




Ch. 7, pg. 246

Definition: pharmacodynamics

The process by which a medication works on the body




Ch. 7, pg. 246

Definition: pharmacology

The study of the properties and effects of medications




Ch. 7, pg. 246

Definition: polypharmacy

The use of multiple medication on a regular basis




Ch. 7, pg. 246

Definition: prescription medications

Medications that are distributed to patients only by pharmacists according to a physician's order.




Ch. 7, pg. 246

Definition: side effects

Any effects of a medication other than the desired ones




Ch. 7, pg. 246

Definition: solution

A liquid mixture than cannot be separated by filtering or allowing the mixture to stand




Ch. 7, pg. 246

Definition: subcutaneous (SC) injection

Injection into the tissue between the skin and muscle; a medication delivery route




Ch. 7, pg. 246

Definition: sublingual (SL)

Under the tongue; a medication delivery route




Ch. 7, pg. 246

Definition: suspension

A mixture of ground particles that are distributed evenly throughout a liquid but do not dissolve




Ch. 7, pg. 246

Definition: topical medications

Lotions, creams, and ointments that are applied to the surface of the skin and affect only that area; a medication delivery route




Ch. 7, pg. 246

Definition: trade name

The brand name that a manufacturer gives a medication; the name is capitalized




Ch. 7, pg. 246

Definition: transcutaneous (transdermal)

Through the skin; a medication delivery route




Ch. 7, pg. 246

Definition: unintended effect

Actions that are undesirable but pose little risk to the patient




Ch. 7, pg. 246

Definition: untoward effects

Actions that can be harmful to the patient




Ch. 7, pg. 246

AIA-1: The patient tells you that the name of her new medication is Tenormin. This name is an example of a:


A: trade name


B: generic name


C: chemical name


D: official name

A: trade name




Ch. 7, pg. 247

AIA-2: The patient was prescribed Tenormin to lower her blood pressure. This is referred to as the medication's:


A: indication


B: contraindication


C: side effect


D: intended effect

A: indications




Ch. 7, pg. 247

AIA-3: The symptoms that occurred following the patient's dose of Tenormin are considered:


A: indications


B: contraindications


C: side effects


D: intended effects

C: side effects



Ch. 7, pg. 247


AIA-4: While you are obtaining the SAMPLE history from the patient, she tells you that she has a history of diabetes mellitus and she takes insulin. Through what medication route is insulin administered?


A: Intravenous


B: Rectal


C: Subcutaneous


D: Intramuscular

C: subcutaneous




Ch. 7, pg. 247

AIA-5: Your partner is preparing to administer oxygen to the patient. What is the preferred method for delivering oxygen to a breathing patient?


A: nasal cannula


B: nonrebreathing mask


C: bag-mask device


D: venturi mask

B: nonrebreathing mask




Ch. 7, pg. 247

AIA-6: Placing the patient on oxygen is considered what type of medication delivery?


A: peer-assisted


B: EMT-administered


C: patient-assisted


D: supervisor-assisted

B: EMT-administered




Ch. 7, pg. 247

AIA-7: As you are preparing to place the patient on the stretcher she suddenly remembers that she uses an inhaler for "breathing problems." Which of the following is a common medication that is delivered via an inhaler?


A: Nitroglycerin


B: Clopidogrel


C: Atorvastatin


D: Albuterol

D: Albuterol




Ch. 7, pg. 247

AIA-8: Which of the following is considered a major disadvantage of the use of a metered-dose inhaler?


A: The inhaler needs to be kept at a cold temp.


B: Medications are not absorbed as well from the lung tissue


C: The patient must be cooperative to assist in its use.


D: Use of a metered-dose inhaler is associated with many side effects

C: the patient must be cooperative to assist in its use.




Ch. 7, pg. 247

AIA-9: What route of medication administration has the fastest onset of action? Why?

Medications delivered intravenously have the fastest onset because they are delivered directly into the bloodstream where they can be sent to any part of the body.



Ch. 7, pg. 247


AIA-10: Why is it important to ask patients if they take any over-the-counter medications, vitamins, or herbal remedies in addition to prescription medications?

Many patients will not feel that it is necessary to mention they take those types of substances, but they may interact with other medications.




Ch. 7, pg. 247